Muta: Viperidae : implications for neotropical biogeography, systematics, and conservation



Yüklə 378,15 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/2
tarix10.07.2017
ölçüsü378,15 Kb.
  1   2

Biological Journal of the Linnean Society (1997), 62: 421–442. With 5 figures

Phylogeography of the bushmaster (Lachesis

muta: Viperidae): implications for neotropical

biogeography, systematics, and conservation

KELLY R. ZAMUDIO



Department of Zoology, University of Washington, Box 351800, Seattle, WA 98195-1800,

U.S.A.

HARRY W. GREENE



Museum of Vertebrate Zoology and Department of Integrative Biology, 3101 Valley Life Sciences

Building, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3160, U.S.A.

Received 28 November 1996; accepted for publication 9 May 1997

We used mitochondrial gene sequences to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships among

subspecies of the bushmaster, Lachesis muta. These large vipers are widely distributed in

lowland tropical forests in Central and South America, where three of four allopatric

subspecies are separated by montane barriers. Our phylogeny indicates that the four

subspecies belong to two clades, the Central American and South American lineages. We

use published molecular studies of other taxa to estimate a ‘reptilian mtDNA rate’ and thus

temporal boundaries for major lineage divergences in Lachesis. We estimate that the Central

and South American forms diverged 18–6 Mya, perhaps due to the uplifting of the Andes,

whereas the two Central American subspecies may have diverged 11–4 Mya with the uprising

of the Cordillera de Talamanca that separates them today. South American bushmasters

from the Amazon Basin and the Atlantic Forest are not strongly di

fferentiated, perhaps due

to episodic gene flow during the Pleistocene, when suitable habitat for this species was at

times more continuous. Our results agree with previous evidence that genetic divergence

among some neotropical vertebrates pre-dated Pleistocene forest fragmentation cycles and

the appearance of the Panamanian Isthmus. Based on morphological, behavioral, and

molecular evidence, we recognize three species of Lachesis. In addition to L. muta, the

widespread South American form, the Central American forms are treated as distinct species

(L. melanocephala and L. stenophrys), each deserving of special conservation status due to

restricted distribution and habitat destruction.

© 1997 The Linnean Society of London

ADDITIONAL KEY WORDS:—molecular clock – species concepts – vicariance – genetic

di

fferentiation – conservation – Serpentes.



Correspondence to: Dr K.R. Zamudio, current address: Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, 3101

Valley Life Sciences Building, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3160, U.S.A. e-mail:

zamudio@socrates.berkeley.edu

421


0024–4066/97/110421

+22 $25.00/0/bj970162

© 1997 The Linnean Society of London


K. R. ZAMUDIO AND H. W. GREENE

422


CONTENTS

Introduction .

.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

422


Material and methods

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

423



Population sampling and laboratory protocols

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

423



Data analyses .

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



425

Estimating evolutionary divergence times in Lachesis

.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

425



Results

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

426


Genetic di

fferentiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

426

Phylogenetic relationships .



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

429


Rates of reptile mtDNA evolution and divergences in Lachesis

.

.



.

.

.



431

Discussion

.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

432



Biogeographical implications .

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

432


Species concepts and bushmaster taxonomy .

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

435



Conservation .

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



436

Acknowledgements

.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

438



References

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



.

.

.



438

INTRODUCTION

Systematists have demonstrated patterns of strong di

fferentiation between Central

and South American biotas, involving species as well as higher taxa (e.g. Savage,

1966, 1982; Rosen, 1975; Wake & Lynch, 1976; Duellman, 1979; Gentry, 1982a;

Cadle, 1985; Crother, Campbell & Hillis, 1992). Such analyses of individual

lineages might corroborate previous biogeographic models as well as generate novel

hypotheses, the predictions of which are testable with phylogeographic studies of

additional groups with similar distributional patterns. Congruent phylogenetic pat-

terns among diverse groups, interpreted in a geological context, can then be used

to infer a generalized history of the area under study (e.g. Kluge, 1989; Cracraft,

1994). Such general historical explanations for patterns of di

fferentiation within and

among taxa require estimates of the temporal framework for the separation of

lineages within each group, because a common temporal framework may not apply

to all groups with similar geographic distributions (Cadle, 1985). Thus, detailed

studies of specific taxa should include, whenever possible, a temporal estimate

independent of that assumed for the underlying biogeographic model.

Although a number of workers have focused on major lineage divergences within

large radiations of neotropical organisms (e.g. Cadle, 1984a,b,c; Prance, 1987;

Cracraft & Prum, 1988; Ayres & Clutton-Brock, 1992), few investigators have

addressed more recent di

fferentiation among widespread species or populations (but

see Patton, da Silva & Malcolm, 1996; Patton, in press). Here we use mtDNA

sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships among populations of four allopatric

subspecies of a widespread neotropical pitviper, the bushmaster (Lachesis muta), then

use a molecular clock calibrated for ‘reptilian rates’ of mtDNA evolution to estimate

temporal boundaries for major divergence events within this lineage. Our objectives

here are first to elucidate the evolutionary history of a prominent component of the

Central and South American herpetofauna, assess its relevance to neotropical

biogeography and climatic history, and thereby contribute to the emerging rap-

prochement of paleontological and neontological perspectives on neotropical biotas

(e.g. Cadle & Greene, 1993; Webb & Rancy, 1996; Lundberg, 1997; Patton, in

press). Then, based on our phylogenetic hypothesis, published morphological and

behavioral di

fferences, and the allopatric distributions of distinctive population


BUSHMASTER PHYLOGENY

423


40

10

20



80

50

0



10

60

70



rhombeata

muta

78

15



9

87

12



81

84

stenophrys



melanocephala

Figure 1. Geographic distributions of the four subspecies of Lachesis muta in Central and South America

(modified from Campbell and Lamar, 1989). Collection localities for specimens included in our study

are denoted by solid dots.

groups, we revise species boundaries for these snakes. Finally, we assess the con-

servation status of bushmasters in light of our findings.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Population sampling and laboratory protocols

We obtained ventral scale clips of Lachesis muta from animals in private and public

animal collections. Our tissue samples include all four subspecies of L. muta (Fig. 1)

and two New World pitviper outgroups, Atropoides nummifer and Agkistrodon contortrix.

We sequenced genes of 16 individuals of L. muta from 10 localities throughout Central


K. R. ZAMUDIO AND H. W. GREENE

424


T

 1. Unique mtDNA lineages of Lachesis used for phylogenetic reconstruction. The subspecies,

number of individuals with each haplotype, localities of origin, and the sources of tissue samples are

listed for reference

mtDNA haplotype

Subspecies

Number

Localities



Source

Muta 1


L. m. muta

3

Tepoe, Surinam (2);



D. Ripa

Surinam, exact locality

Dallas Zoo, U.S.A.

unknown (1)

Muta 2

L. m. muta

1

Surinam, exact locality



Dallas Zoo, U.S.A.

unknown


Muta 3

L. m. muta

1

Napo Waimo River area,



Dallas Zoo, U.S.A.

Ecuador


Muta 4

L. m. muta

3

Ribeira˜o Cascalheira (3),



Instituto Butantan, Brazil

Mato Grosso, Brazil

Muta 5

L. m. muta

1

Pontes e Lacerda, Mato



Instituto Butantan, Brazil

Grosso, Brazil

Rhombeata 1

L. m. rhombeata

2

Sao Jose´ do Lage, Alagoas,



Instituto Butantan, Brazil

Brazil (1); Sa˜o Paulino,

D. Ripa

Bahia, Brazil (1)



Rhombeata 2

L. m. rhombeata

1

Recife, Pemambuco, Brazil



Instituto Butantan, Brazil

Melanocephala 1



L. m. melanocephala

2

Rincon, Peninsula de Osa,



D. Ripa

Costa Rica (2)

Stenophrys 1

L. m. stenophrys

2

Bri-Bri (1) and Chiroles (1),



D. Ripa

Costa Rica

and South America (Table 1), including all subspecies as well as geographically distant

localities from throughout the range of the widespread Amazon Basin subspecies

(L. m. muta). Although the small number of samples limits interpretation of geographic

genetic structuring within subspecies, they proved su

fficient to elucidate phylogenetic

relationships among bushmaster subspecies and their biogeographical history.

Total cellular DNA was isolated from frozen tissue samples by standard proteinase

K extraction, followed by phenol/chloroform purifications (Maniatis, Frisch &

Sambrook, 1982). Two segments of the mitochondrial genome were amplified with

the polymerase chain reaction (PCR; Saiki et al., 1988) and two pairs of primers.

The regions sequenced correspond to 252 bases of the ND4 gene and 276 bases of

the cytochrome gene (cytb). The ND4 gene segment was amplified using primers

ND4 (5

′-CAC CTA TGA CTA CCA AAA GCT CAT GTA GAA GC-3′) and



LEU (5

′-CAT TAC TTT TAC TTG GAT TTG CAC CA-3′) (Are´valo, Davis &

Sites, 1994). Amplification conditions for the ND4 fragment consisted of 30 thermal

cycles: 1 min denaturation at 93

°C, 30 sec annealing at 56°C, and 2 min extension

at 72


°C, followed by a 5 min extension at 72°C. The cytb fragment was amplified

using primers MVZ05 (5

′-CGA AGC TTG ATA TGA AAA ACC ATC GTT G-

3

′) and MVZ 04′ (5′-GTA GCA CCT CAG AA[C/G/T] GAT ATT TG-3′).



Amplification conditions for the cytb fragment consisted of 30 thermal cycles: 1 min

denaturation at 94

°C, 1 min annealing at 45°C, and 2 min extension at 72°C,

followed by a 5 min extension at 72

°C. In every case, one primer was marked

with a biotinylated 5

′ end. Four microliters of the resulting PCR products were

eletrophoresed on a 1% agarose gel and visualized with ethidium bromide staining

to verify product band size. Single-stranded template for sequencing was obtained

directly from the remaining amplified product by use of Streptavidin-coated magnetic

beads (according to manufacturer’s protocol, Dynal, Inc.). The bead/DNA solution

was used directly in dideoxy chain-termination sequencing (Sanger, Nicklen &



BUSHMASTER PHYLOGENY

425


Coulson, 1977) with Sequenase Version 2.0 (U.S. Biochemicals) and

35

S labelled



dATP. Sequences were obtained for only one direction, using primers ND4 and

MVZ04


′ in the sequencing reactions.

Data analyses

Sequences were read from one strand and aligned by eye to each other and to

published sequences of Xenopus (Roe et al., 1985). Pairwise sequence comparisons to

determine the distribution and amount of variation, and levels of saturation by

codon position were performed using the Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Program

(MEGA, Version 1.01; Kumar, Tamura & Nei, 1993). Phylogenetic analysis was

performed using aligned sequences for both gene regions combined (total 528

nucleotides). We used only unique mtDNA lineages for phylogenetic reconstruction

(Table 1), so our final data set, including the two outgroup species, is composed of

11 unique mtDNA haplotypes. All mtDNA sequences included in this study have

been entered in the GenBank/EMBL databases under accession numbers U96015-

U96034.


We used maximum likelihood (ML; Felsenstein, 1981, 1993) and maximum

parsimony analysis (Swo

fford, 1997), in combination with various weighting schemes,

for phylogenetic inference. Each base position was treated as an unordered character

with four alternative states. Trees were rooted by outgroup comparisons with

sequences of two New World pitvipers (Akgistrodon contortrix and Atropoides nummmifer).

We reconstructed and evaluated maximum likelihood trees using the DNAML

program in Phylip 3.5 (Felsenstein, 1993). In ML we used equal-weighting, where

all substitutions are weighted equally regardless of type or codon position, and three

di

fferential transitions/transversion weighting schemes (ts/tv=1/5, ts/tv=1/10,



and ts/tv

=1/15). Sequence of taxon entry in phylogenetic reconstructions can bias

species position in the resulting tree (Maddison, 1991), so we used ten repeated

randomized input orders for all ML analyses. Maximum parsimony phylogenies

were estimated using the exhaustive search option in PAUP

∗ 4.0 (Swofford et al.,

1996). We searched for most parsimonious trees by using four weighting schemes:

one assuming equal weights for every codon position and the others downweighting

only third-position transitions relative to all other substitution types (by a factor of

5, 10, and 15). For each weighting scheme, we also performed bootstrap analyses

as a relative measure of clade support (Felsenstein, 1985; Hillis & Bull, 1993); these

were based on 1000 replicates, each using the branch and bound algorithm.

Parsimony and ML results were compared across all weighting methods for con-

gruence of tree topologies.



Estimating evolutionary divergence times in Lachesis

Studies of mtDNA evolution among various vertebrate lineages indicate a mutation

rate of approximately 2% sequence divergence per million years (Upholt & Dawid,

1977; Brown, George & Wilson, 1979), and this ‘standard’ rate has been used to

date divergences in numerous other taxa (e.g. Meyer et al., 1990; Thorpe et al.,

1994; Riddle, 1995). Recent evidence underscores variation in the rate of mtDNA

evolution among vertebrates (Avise et al., 1992; Martin, Naylor & Palumbi, 1992;


K. R. ZAMUDIO AND H. W. GREENE

426


Rand, 1993, 1994), implying that rate calibrations for one group may not be

appropriate for others. In particular, absolute rate-heterogeneity is associated prim-

arily with body size and metabolic rate (Martin & Palumbi, 1993; Rand, 1994),

such that endotherms and ectotherms exhibit distinct relationships, and rate of

mtDNA evolution and an organism’s body size are negatively correlated within each

group. Rates and associated errors of clocks should thus be calibrated for a specific

taxonomic group under study, based on the fossil record or vicariant events, and

interpreted with caution (Rand, 1994). To more accurately estimate the temporal

scale of diversification in bushmasters, we calibrated the rate of mtDNA evolution

for reptiles based on other published studies in this group. The requirements for

inclusion in our rate estimate were that the ectotherm should be roughly similar in

mass to Lachesis, large adults of which weigh 3–5 kg (Greene, unpublished data), and

that the ‘known’ divergence date (from fossils or geologic evidence) was at least

5 Mya (to avoid biases associated with very recent divergences). We then used the

highest and lowest rates observed in the published studies to define boundaries of

divergence times during the evolutionary history of Lachesis.

Five studies meet our criteria for estimating a ‘reptile mtDNA rate’ (Table 2).

Lamb, Avise & Gibbons (1989) reported divergences and rates of evolution within

and between species of tortoises based on RFLP analysis of the entire mtDNA

genome; because they included more than one individual from within each species

or lineage, we corrected for within-lineage sequence divergences (according to Avise

et al., 1992). Thorpe et al. (1994) applied a standard vertebrate clock (2%/my) to

estimate colonization times for Gallotia galloti in the Canary Islands from two mainland

ancestors; we combined their sequence data for cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase

subunit I, and 12S rRNA to estimate a mitochondrial divergence rate, assuming

colonization occurred from ancestral populations at the time of the origin of the

islands. We averaged the resulting rates from both putative ancestors and did not

correct for within-lineage divergences, because the authors reported sequences for

only one individual from each species. We estimated a mitochondrial divergence

rate for xantusiid lizards from the cytochrome and rRNA 12S sequence-based

phylogeny of Hedges, Bezy & Maxson (1991), by assuming that the Cuban endemic



Cricosaura diverged from other xantusiids as the proto-Antilles drifted from their

original Middle American position, approximately 70–60 Mya (Crother & Guyer,

1996; Hedges, 1996). Finally, we used sequences for Galapagos iguanas and

immediate outgroup taxa (Rassmann, 1997) and estimated their divergence rate,

assuming speciation began shortly after geologic origin of the islands. In this study,

our estimated rate combined 16S and 12S gene fragments and was averaged across

both species.

RESULTS


Genetic di

fferentiation

We obtained sequences of 528 base pairs (coding for 176 amino acids) from 16

individuals of Lachesis muta and one individual each of Agkistrodon contortrix and

Atropoides nummifer. No substitutions causing frameshifts were present, and sequences

from both gene segments were combined in the final analysis. Levels of uncorrected



BUSHMASTER PHYLOGENY

427


T




2.

mtDNA


evolution

rates


for

reptile


species

or

lineages.



The

evolutionary

event,

possible


vicariant

events,


%

sequence


divergence,

method


of

divergence

estimation,

and


approximate

divergence

rate

are


listed

for


the

five


reptiles

used


in

this


study

Evolutionary

event

Vicariant



event

(time


at

%

sequence



Method

of

Divergence



rate

References

divergence,

Mya)


divergence

estimation

(%/my)

Xer

obates

,

east/west



Bouse

embayment

(5.5)

5.3


a

RFLP


(entire

0.95


Lamb

et

al.

,

1989



mtDNA)

Gopherus/Xer

obates

None


b

(23–15)


11.2

a

RFLP



(entire

0.48–0.75

Lamb

et

al.

,

1989



mtDNA)

Gallotia

galloti

,

from



Origin/colonization

of

12.5



c

Sequence


(cytb,

0.80


Thorpe

et

al.

,

1994



ancestral

populations

island

(15.7)


COI,

12S


averaged)

Cricosaura

/other


Fragmentation

of

island



32.6

c

Sequence



(cytb

0.47–0.50

Hedges

et

al.

,

1991



xantusiids

arc


(60–70)

and


12S

averaged)



Amblyr

hyncus

and


Origin/colonization

of

6.6



c

Sequence


(12S

0.73–1.32

Rassmann

(in


press)

Conolophus

/mainland

island

(9–5)


and

16S


sister

species


averaged)

a

%



sequence

divergence

corrected

for


within

lineage


divergences:

p

corr

=

p



xy

0.5(



p

x

+

p



y

),

where



p

xy

is

the



mean

pairwise


genetic

distance


between

individuals

in

populations



x

and


y,

and


p

x

and


p

y

are


nucleotide

diversities

within

regions


or

populations

(Avise

et

al.

,

1993).



b

Divergence

time

of

genera



estimated

from


fossil

record.


c

Average


of

uncorrected

%

sequence


divergence

between


sister

species.


K. R. ZAMUDIO AND H. W. GREENE

428


T

 3. Percent sequence divergences (uncorrected) among all unique mtDNA Lachesis haplotypes

and two outgroups (Agkistrodon contortrix and Atropoides nummifer). Above diagonal: mean pairwise sequence

divergences; below diagonal: absolute nucleotide di

fferences (for both gene segments combined)

1

2



3

4

5



6

7

8



9

10

11



1

Stenophrys 1

0.053 0.074 0.080 0.078 0.076 0.083 0.076 0.078 0.146 0.167



2

Melanocephala 1

28



0.087 0.089 0.091 0.089 0.091 0.089 0.091 0.142 0.170



3

Muta 1


39

46



0.006 0.011 0.009 0.013 0.008 0.009 0.144 0.159

4

Muta 2



42

47

3



0.013 0.011 0.015 0.009 0.011 0.146 0.161

5

Muta 3


41

48

6



7

0.002 0.013 0.011 0.009 0.138 0.159



6

Muta 4


40

47

5



6

1



0.011 0.009 0.011 0.140 0.161

7

Muta 5



44

48

7



8

7

6



0.013 0.015 0.146 0.161

8

Rhombeata 1



40

47

4



5

6

5



7

0.002 0.144 0.163



9

Rhombeata 2

41

48

5



6

5

6



8

1



0.142 0.161

10

A. contortrix

77

75

76



77

73

74



77

76

75



0.148


11

A. nummifer

88

90



84

85

84



85

85

86



85

78



0.10

0.10


0

0.08


0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08

0.06


0.04

0.02


T

ransversions

p-distance (uncorrected)

0.10


0.10

0

0.08



0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08

0.06


0.04

0.02


0.9

0.90


0

0.70


0.1

0.3


0.5

0.7


0.50

0.30


0.10

0.10


0.10

0

0.08



0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08

0.06


0.04

0.02


T

ransitions

0.10

0.10


0

0.08


0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08

0.06


0.04

0.02


0.9

0.90


0

0.70


0.1

0.3


0.5

0.7


0.50

0.30


0.10

1st position

2nd position

3rd position

Tamura-Nei distance

Figure 2. Saturation graphs for transitions and transversions at 1st, 2nd, and 3rd codon positions.

Pairwise comparisons between all Lachesis haplotypes and two outgroups using uncorrected proportional

distances and Tamura-Nei corrected distances are plotted for all six substitution categories. Deviations

from the isometric line indicate that changes in that particular class of mutation are possibly biased

due to ‘multiple hits’ at any one nucleotide position.

sequence divergence among the nine unique Lachesis haplotypes ranged from 0.2%

(among samples of the South American forms) to 9.1% (between L. m. melanocephala

and South American forms; Table 3). Uncorrected sequence divergences between

Lachesis and the outgroup taxa ranged from 13.8 to 17.0%. Of the total 528

characters, 138 were variable and 69 were phylogenetically informative.

To assess levels of saturation of base substitutions at each codon position, we

plotted uncorrected percent sequence divergences against Tamura-Nei estimates of

relative sequence divergence for transitions and transversions at 1st, 2nd, and 3rd

codon positions (Fig. 2; modified from Moritz, Schneider & Wake, 1992; Villablanca,



BUSHMASTER PHYLOGENY

429


0

1

2



3

4

5



%

melanocephala1

Peninsula de Osa, Costa Rica

outgroups

stenophrys1

Bri-bri/Chiroles, Costa Rica



rhombeata2

Pernambuco, Brazil



rhombeata1

muta5

muta4

Alagoas/Bahia, Brazil



muta3

Mato Grosso, Brazil



muta2

Equador


muta1

Surinam


Figure 3. Maximum likelihood phylogeny for nine unique haplotypes of Lachesis with all characters

weighted equally. The tree was rooted by the two outgroups sequenced in this study (Atropoides nummifer

and Agkistrodon contortrix). Reconstructions with transitions and transversions weighted di

fferentially are

identical in topology to the tree shown here. Except where indicated, branches are drawn proportional

to branch lengths estimated by the Maximum Likelihood algorithm and a % scale is included for

reference.

1993). Non-isometric plots indicate increasing saturation of transitions or trans-

versions at each codon position; third position transitions are potentially saturated

and thus may possibly bias phylogenetic reconstruction because of ‘multiple hits’.

We therefore explored a number of di

fferent weighting schemes in our reconstructions

including equal-weighting, downweighting of third position transitions relative to

other substitutions, and di

fferential weighting of transitions relative to transversions.

Phylogenetic relationships

All weighting schemes in parsimony resulted in three most parsimonious trees,

and the strict consensus of the three trees is represented in Figure 4. Parsimony

reconstruction under equal weighting resulted in three most parsimonious trees that

were 183 steps in length (CI

=0.842, RI=0.736). All differential weighting schemes

resulted in 3 parsimonious trees that varied in length: L

=459 (for 3rd position

transitions downweighted 1:5), L

=804 (1:10), and L=1149 (1:15), but were consistent

in other measures of fit (CI

=0.806, RI=0.731). Maximum likelihood reconstructions



K. R. ZAMUDIO AND H. W. GREENE

430


melanocephala1

Peninsula de Osa, Costa Rica

outgroups

stenophrys1

Bri-bri/Chiroles, Costa Rica



rhombeata2

Pernambuco, Brazil



rhombeata1

muta5

muta4

Alagoas/Bahia, Brazil



muta3

Mato Grosso, Brazil



muta2

Equador


muta1

Surinam


87

84

88



86

67

67



65

64

100



65

64

67



65

86

88



87

86

98



94

98

97



100

Figure 4. Strict consensus of three most parsimonious phylogenies for nine unique haplotypes of



Lachesis. Numbers along the branches are bootstrap values from the four weighting schemes used in

parsimony reconstruction. Bootstrap values were estimated from 1000 replicates and are listed (from

top to bottom) for equal-weighting, and for third position transitions downweighted by a factor of 5,

10, and 15 relative to other substitution types. A single number is listed at nodes where bootstraps

were identical for all weighting schemes.

yielded identical topologies to those obtained in parsimony. Ten independent ML

reconstructions with equal weighting resulted in one tree (Fig. 3; LnL

=−1608.4).

Multiple ML runs with di

fferential weighting of transitions and transversions resulted

in identical topologies: LnL

=−1577.5 for a ts/tv of 1:5, LnL=−1588.2 for ts/tv

of 1:10, and LnL

=−1598.3 for ts/tv of 1:15. These results suggest that the transition

bias evident in third codon positions in our data does not a

ffect phylogenetic

reconstruction.

Maximum likelihood (Fig. 3) and maximum parsimony (Fig. 4) methods, under

all weighting assumptions, yielded identical phylogenetic trees for populations of

Lachesis. A single basal divergence separates the four allopatric subspecies of L. muta

into South and Central American pairs. Further di

fferentiation is present in the

Central American forms: the unique mtDNA haplotypes of L. m. stenophrys and L.



m. melanocephala from either side of the Central American Cordillera exhibit clear

genetic di

fferentiation. Divergence in the South American pair is less evident, in

that the Amazon Basin (L. m. muta) and Atlantic Forest forms (L. m. rhombeata) are

closely related and form a polytomy in our reconstruction.

Maximum parsimony bootstrap analyses and maximum likelihood branch lengths

indicate the relative support for all clades in our phylogeny (Figs 3 and 4). The

monophyly of both the South and Central American clades is supported by high

bootstrap values (ranging from 94 to 100%), and long branches are indicative of


BUSHMASTER PHYLOGENY

431


T

 4. Upper and lower time estimates for major divergences within Lachesis using the reptile

mtDNA divergence rates. Overall sequence divergences are corrected for within-lineage variability

according to Avise (1992)

mtDNA clock rate

Estimated time

Evolutionary divergence

Sequence divergence (%)

(%/my)

(Mya) (upper and lower)



Between South and

8.44


0.47

17.9


Central America

1.32


6.4

Between stenophrys and

5.30

0.47


11.0

melanocephala

1.32


4.0

Between muta and

0.40

0.47


0.8

rhombeata

1.32


0.3

deep di


fferentiation between the two sister pairs. Divergence between the two

Central American subspecies is also well supported, as is evident from the long

branches in the ML reconstruction (Fig. 3). Our sampling allows for only tentative

interpretation of divergences within the South American lineage, but most branches

are relatively short and bootstrap resampling in the parsimony analysis o

ffers limited

support for geographic di

fferentiation within this clade. Although the haplotypes

representing the Atlantic Forest L. m. rhombeata are distinct and form their own clade

(supported by bootstraps >85%), their phylogenetic placement is uncertain; there is

some suggestion that L. m. rhombeata may be more closely related to particular

populations of L. m. muta in southern regions of its distribution (e.g. Mato Grosso,

Brazil). In any case, di

fferentiation among the South American samples is less

pronounced than between the Central American subspecies.

Rates of reptile mtDNA evolution and divergences in Lachesis

The reptilian mtDNA rates we estimated vary from 0.47 to 1.32%/my (Table 3)

and, although the particular mtDNA genes used in the five published studies were

di

fferent than those we used for Lachesis, all estimates are lower than the 2%/my



commonly used ‘vertebrate rate’ (based primarily on data for mammals). Our rates

are simply high and low point estimates based on five appropriate studies. Each of

these estimates is only an approximate calibration, because they do not include

corrections for sequence errors or saturation of changes at most variable codon

positions. We are well aware of the di

fficulty of applying molecular clock estimates

(e.g. Collins, 1996; Hillis, Mable & Moritz, 1996), and regard our ‘ballpark’

estimates of mtDNA divergence rates only as a useful starting point in formulating

biogeographic hypotheses for small to medium-sized ectotherms. Accordingly, a

lineage including Lachesis split from our outgroup pitvipers roughly 36–10 Mya, by

the mid-Miocene and perhaps much earlier. Divergence between South and Central

American Lachesis might have occurred 18.0–6.5 Mya, the split between Central

American L. m. melanocephala and L. m. stenophrys perhaps took place 11–4 Mya, and


K. R. ZAMUDIO AND H. W. GREENE

432


Arid/wet

glacial


cycles

Cool/warm

climatic

cycles


Gradual cooling

and drying

Panamanian

Landbridge

formed

Uplift of



Talamancas

Increased uplift and

volcanism in Andes

Rise of Andes

0

Mya


10

20

<0.8 Mya



L. muta muta

L. muta rhombeata

11–4 Mya


L. stenophrys

L. melanocephala

18–6 Mya


Figure 5. Summary diagram of evolutionary history of Lachesis populations. The current phylogeny

of Lachesis (left) is drawn according to the geological scale and the time ranges estimated by our

calibration are listed for each node. To the right of the scale are the relevant abiotic changes in

Central and South America during this time period (modified from Potts and Behrensmeyer, 1992).

di

fferentiation among the South American lineages happened only 300 000 to



800 000 years ago (Table 4 and Fig. 5).

DISCUSSION



Biogeographical implications

Morphological and molecular evidence thus far o

ffers limited insights on the

origin of Lachesis. Briefly, pitvipers probably diverged from other vipers in Eurasia

during the early Tertiary, and invaded the New World via a Bering land bridge no

later than the Miocene (Cadle, 1987; Kraus, Mink & Brown, 1996). Studies to date

suggest that bushmasters are not basal to all other New World pitvipers or even to

all other predominantly neotropical lineages, and there is as yet no strong evidence

linking Lachesis with any particular other pitviper lineages (Kraus, Mink & Brown,

1996; Vidal et al., 1997). Therefore, although these snakes are often assigned to

South American faunal assemblages in biogeographic analyses, from the perspective

of vicariance biogeography, we cannot at this point exclude the hypothesis that

Central American Lachesis are remnants of initial colonization of the tropics (from

the north) rather than more recent immigrants from South America.



BUSHMASTER PHYLOGENY

433


The allopatric ranges of current subspecies, subdivided by major montane axes

(the Andes and the Cordillera de Talamanca), suggest that vicariant geologic events

underlie di

fferentiation in these snakes. Bushmasters typically occur at elevations

below 1000 m in moist tropical forests (Vial & Jı´menez-Porras, 1967); the only

exception is L. m. melanocephala in Costa Rica, which inhabits forests up to at least

1500 m (Solo´rzano & Cerdas, 1986). In addition to the mountain ranges currently

separating Lachesis subspecies, our current understanding of Central and South

American geological history suggests a dynamic picture of tectonic movement

interspersed by temporary links between the two continents over the last 150 million

years (Gentry, 1982a; Estes & Baez, 1985; Ra¨sa¨nen, Salo & Kalliola, 1987; Pindell

& Barrett, 1990; Hoorne, 1993, 1994). Much of this history probably predates the

evolution of Lachesis or its ancestors; however, given uncertainty about the first

appearance of vipers in the New World and about the age of Lachesis (Cadle, 1987),

we review several geologic events which may have occurred during the evolution

of the bushmasters and, thus, may explain patterns of di

fferentiation among popu-

lations in this species.

Most interpretations of geologic data infer two connections between Central and

South America during the last 100 million years. The first occurred during the late

Cretaceous or early Tertiary (90–60 Mya) and was not a continuous land bridge,

but rather a series of volcanic arcs connecting North and South America (also

referred to as the proto-Antilles; Gentry, 1982a; Pindell & Barrett, 1990; Crother

& Guyer, 1996; Hedges, 1996). A northeastward drift of this system fragmented the

distributions of taxa across this island bridge at the beginning of the Tertiary

(

>80 Mya). There was in fact faunal exchange between the two continents (including



by dinosaurs, crocodilians, lizards, and primitive snakes) at the Cretaceous-Tertiary

boundary (Estes & Baez, 1985). Both continents were separated to at least some

degree by a marine barrier for much of the Tertiary, and this vicariant event has

been implicated in the diversification of various groups of organisms, including some

frogs, colubrid snakes, and angiosperms (Gentry, 1982a; Savage, 1982; Cadle, 1985).

The second proposed connection is the Pliocene formation of the Isthmian Link

at approximately 3.5 Mya, during which extensive volcanism led to the uplift of

islands that eventually coalesced into today’s Isthmus of Panama (Coates & Obando,

1996). This re-establishment of a dispersal route between North and South America

heavily influenced present distributions of a variety of organisms, particularly land

mammals (Marshall et al., 1982; Webb, 1991); however, although some taxa dispersed

wholesale during this interchange (references in Stehli & Webb, 1985), current

distributional patterns indicate minimal interchange for Central and South American

amphibians and reptiles (Cadle, 1985; Vanzolini & Heyer, 1985). For those latter

groups, dispersal subsequent to complete closure of the marine Panamanian Portal

seems to have been limited to a few species which favor drier habitats (e.g. the

neotropical rattlesnake Crotalus durissus), those conditions having predominated in

the area at that time (Cadle, 1987). Despite the lack of a continuous dispersal route

during most of the Tertiary, fossil and recent phylogeographic evidence suggests

terrestrial faunal exchanges did occur between the continents during most of this

time (Cadle & Sarich, 1981; Estes & Baez, 1985). Reptiles in particular must have

moved between the northern and southern land masses, perhaps by means of shifting

island chains that formed in the area occupied today by lower Central America.

Geological or climatic events with potentially major importance for neotropical

species during the Cenozoic included the uplift of the Andes, the uplift of the Central


K. R. ZAMUDIO AND H. W. GREENE

434


American highlands, and the advent of Pleistocene climatic fluctuations associated

with glacial advances and retreats at higher latitudes. The Andean orogeny is

complex. It is well established that certain parts of the Andes already existed during

the Cretaceous (Van der Hammen, 1961; Kroonenberg, Bakker & Van der Wiel,

1990), although at much lower elevations. Mid-Miocene activity in the Andean axis

uplifted much of the northern Cordillera to elevations above 1000 m approximately

14–11 Mya (Potts & Behrensmeyer, 1992; Guerrero, 1993), and this was followed

by a second more dramatic uplift during the Pliocene and Pleistocene (Potts &

Behrensmeyer, 1992) when the mountains reached their present elevations above

4000 m. The initial mid-Miocene uplift of the Andes is associated with wide-scale

change in the Neotropical flora (Gentry, 1982a; Van der Hammen, 1989) and major

physiographic changes in the Amazon Basin (Ra¨sa¨nen et al., 1987; Hoorne, 1994).

Our estimated time span for divergence between Central and South American

clades of Lachesis (Table 4) overlaps that of a major uplift of the northern Andes (to

above 1000 m) and the development of high montane vegetation in the mid Miocene

(15–12 Mya).

A second major physiographic development, the uplift of the Central American

highlands, might also have been an important vicariant event for bushmasters.

Central American orogeny seems to have occurred from north to south, with

montane habitats first forming during the Miocene (Savage, 1982; Coates & Obando,

1996). The uplift of the mountains of lower Central America (including the Cordillera

de Talamanca, which presently separates the two Central American bushmasters in

Costa Rica) occurred in the late Miocene or early Pliocene (8–5 Mya) and culminated

in the Pliocene closure of the Panamanian Portal (Coates & Obando, 1996). This

uplift fragmented a homogeneous lowland Central American herpetofauna into

allopatric Atlantic and Pacific lowland assemblages (e.g. Savage, 1982; Crother et



al., 1992). Today the Atlantic lowlands are composed primarily of humid evergreen

forests while the Pacific Versant, with the exception of southeastern Costa Rica,

encompasses subhumid to semi-arid deciduous or thorn forests. Moist tropical forest

habitat, inhabited by Pacific Coast Lachesis, is found on the Osa Peninsula and

adjacent Golfo Dulce region. Our molecular data are consistent with a hypothesis

that Lachesis m. melanocephala and L. m. stenophrys diverged during the late Miocene

or early Pliocene, and their di

fferentiation was at least broadly contemporary with

uplift of the Cordillera de Talamanca, the range of mountains that now separates

those taxa.

A final climatic event relevant to di

fferentiation in Lachesis is the onset of

temperature-glacial variations and global cooling in the Cenozoic. Global cooling

accelerated in the late Neogene, with numerous reversals on all continental masses

(Potts & Behrensmeyer, 1992), and culminated in large amplitude climatic oscillations

over the last million years. Tropical climates during the Quaternary were unstable

(Van der Hammen & Absy, 1994) and Pleistocene climatic cycles have received

considerable attention as factors underlying regional areas of high endemism in a

wide variety of Amazonian taxa, including birds (Ha

ffer, 1969), lizards (Vanzolini

& Williams, 1970), angiosperms (Prance, 1982, 1987), and butterflies (Brown,

1982). Proponents of the ‘forest refugia’ hypothesis suggest that lowland forest was

fragmented into isolated patches during Pleistocene glacial cycles, resulting in patterns

of di


fferentiation observed today. This paleoclimatic speciation model has been

widely critiqued (e.g. Cracraft & Prum, 1988; Bush, 1994; Colinvaux et al., 1996;

Vitt & Zani, 1996) and is to a certain extent untestable by studies of di

fferentiation



BUSHMASTER PHYLOGENY

435


in extant taxa, because there is no explicit expectation of area relationships imbedded

within the model (Patton, in press). Nonetheless, available paleoenvironmental,

climatic, and organismal evidence o

ffers a complex scenario for tropical South

America during the Pleistocene, and the possible e

ffects of environmental changes

on the genetic di

fferentiation of tropical lowland taxa should be considered. In fact,

the two South American bushmasters, Lachesis m. rhombeata and L. m. muta, are not

strongly di

fferentiated and evidently experienced gene flow in the recent past.

Currently, those two weakly di

fferentiated taxa are separated by an expanse of dry

and unsuitable habitat between coastal Atlantic Forest and the Amazon Basin, and

thus Pleistocene climatic and vegetational changes might underlie their di

fferentiation.

Our results indicate that the oldest genetic divergences within Lachesis reflect

vicariant events that isolated groups of populations in regions occupied by three of

the four subspecies today (Fig. 5). Given early divergences between Central and

South American clades, the ancestral Lachesis probably was continuously distributed

in Amazonian-Pacific lowlands before fragmentation by the mid-Miocene uplift of

the Andes. Molecular evidence also implies that the ancestral lineages of Central

and South American Lachesis di

fferentiated prior to formation of a continuous

Panamanian Isthmus. Our temporal estimates of divergences also refute the forest

refugia hypothesis for speciation in Lachesis, in that the deepest branching within

this clade occurred much earlier in the Tertiary rather than during Pleistocene

climatic cycles. The genetic imprint of Pleistocene events might be present in recent

divergences among South American populations of L. muta, and a more detailed

study within and between those subspecies will probably reveal diversification not

evident in our results. Finally, our conclusion that initial divergence within bush-

masters predates the Pliocene closing of the Panamanian portal underscores a

continuing enigma in Middle American biogeography (see e.g. Hanken and Wake,

1982, for salamanders; Cadle, 1985, for other snakes), the interchange of terrestrial

organisms across what is usually portrayed as a marine barrier. Although some

vipers occasionally disperse over water (e.g. Lazell, 1964), there is no evidence that

bushmasters do so. These large snakes are absent, for example, from the seemingly

habitable Bocas del Toro archipelago although present on adjacent mainland

Panama (R.I. Crombie, pers. comm.); their presence on Trinidad presumably reflects

prior residency on that continental shelf island (cf. Henderson & Hedges, 1995).



Species concepts and bushmaster taxonomy

Throughout this century bushmasters have been regarded as a single polytypic

species (e.g. Peters & Donoso-Barros, 1970; Hoge & Romano-Hoge, 1978; Campbell

& Lamar, 1989), in keeping with a widely prevalent ‘inertial species concept’ (Good,

1994: 194): taxa are “treated as conspecific because herpetologists are used to them

being conspecific, not because evidence for or against conspecificity has been

rigorously examined.” As Ripa (1994) noted, Lachesis m. muta, L. m. melanocephala,

and L. m. stenophrys are substantially distinctive among themselves, there are no

confirmed zones of intergradation or of overlapping occurrence (but see below), and

no explicit justification exists for the current taxonomy of these vipers. Boulenger

(1896) simply sunk Cope’s (1875) L. stenophrys into L. muta without comment, and

Solo´rzano and Cerdas (1986) described L. m. melanocephala without defending their

decision to treat it as a subspecies rather than a distinct species.


K. R. ZAMUDIO AND H. W. GREENE

436


Morphological and behavioral di

fferences among the subspecies of Lachesis muta

remain poorly explored, but parallel our molecular results (Table 5). The Atlantic

Forest bushmaster (L. m. rhombeata) resembles the widespread Amazonian subspecies

(L. m. muta) in scalation, head and body shape, and behavioral response to danger,

being weakly di

fferentiated only by head colour pattern. Both Central American

taxa are distinct from the South American bushmasters in scalation, head and body

shape, and colour pattern. The Central American bushmaster (L. m. stenophrys) is

distinct from the other three subspecies in scalation, palatine bone shape, and colour

pattern, as is the black-headed bushmaster (L. m. melanocephala) in scalation, colour

pattern, and defensive behaviour; the latter resembles South American bushmasters

in certain morphological attributes, whereas the former is derived in those respects.

Our studies confirm that the four allopatric subspecies of bushmasters are

morphologically and biochemically distinct. The concordance between mor-

phological, behavioral, and molecular markers is evidence that at least three of these

allopatric population groups are on separate evolutionary trajectories, likely having

been isolated for long periods of time, and therefore are distinct evolutionary species

(sensu Frost, Kluge & Hillis, 1992). Accordingly, we propose that they should be

known as Lachesis muta, the South American bushmaster; L. stenophrys (as first described

by Cope, 1875), the Central American bushmaster; and L. melanocephala (Solo´rzano

& Cerdas, 1986; new combination), the black-headed bushmaster. Conversely, the

Atlantic Forest bushmaster is weakly di

fferentiated morphologically and molecularly,

and our mtDNA data suggest that some populations of Amazonian L. m. muta might

be more closely related to the Atlantic L. m. rhombeata than to other populations of



L. m. muta (likely on geographic grounds as well). The Atlantic bushmaster will

continue to be recognized as a subspecies by those who feel that category fills a

useful role in systematics, but we see no reason to upgrade that taxon to species

status.


The bushmasters of eastern Panama and the Pacific lowlands of Colombia and

Ecuador remain problematic. Previous studies of other taxa have demonstrated a

close a

ffiliation between species in the Choco´ lowlands of northwestern South



America and those in Central America (Ha

ffer, 1967; Gentry, 1982b; Chapman,

1917; Brumfield & Capparella, 1996). Campbell & Lamar (1989) believed that

Choco´ populations of Lachesis are probably referable to the widespread Central

American taxon (L. stenophrys), although Martı´nez & Bolan˜os (1982) regarded a

specimen from eastern Panama as L. m. muta, based on its high ventral count. We

think that interbreeding in nature between Central and South American bushmasters

is highly unlikely, given the extent of unsuitable habitat in the Andes and the deep

mtDNA divergence between those clades. Nevertheless, a range-wide analysis of

morphological and molecular variation in bushmasters with particular emphasis on

northwestern South American will clearly be relevant to hypotheses about the

derivation of organisms in the Choco´ region (Chapman, 1917; Ha

ffer, 1967;

Brumfield & Capparella, 1996).



Conservation

Our findings have immediate implications for bushmaster conservation, in that

they underscore the distinctiveness of each of the Central American forms as well as

their precarious status. Rather than weakly di

fferentiated subspecies of a widespread


BUSHMASTER PHYLOGENY

437


T




5.

Morphological

and

behavioral



variation

among


bushmasters

Characters



L.

m.

muta

L.

m.

rhombeata

L.

melanocephala

L.

stenophrys

Source


Ventral

scales


213–230

Boulenger,

1896;

Roze,


Males

>214


>214,

223–225


211–216

198–204


1966;

Peters


&

Donoso-


Females

>225


>226

209–216


199–209

Barros,


1970;

Solo


´rzano

&

Cerdas,



1986

Caudal


scales

49,


36–37

Cope,


1875;

Boulenger,

Males

34–37


44

1896;


Solo

´rzano


&

Cerdas,


Females

35–36


1986

Dorsal


scales

35–37


Boulenger,

1896;


Males

35

36–38



33–36

Solo


´rzano

&

Cerdas,



1986

Females


35

36–40


33–38

Prenasal


scales

Enlarged,

protruberant,

Enlarged,

protruberant,

Reduced,


flat,

rounded


Reduced,

flat,


rounded

Ripa,


1994

triangular

triangular

Internasal

scales

Enlarged


Enlarged

Reduced


Reduced

Ripa,


1994

Canthal


scales

Elongate,

distinct,

upraised


Elongate,

distinct,

upraised

Oval,


indistinct,

flattened


Oval,

indistinct,

flattened

Ripa,


1994

Supralabials

8–11

8–11


7–9

7–9


Ripa,

1994


Head

pattern


Small

distinct


spots,

Large


distinct

spots,


wide

Black


Unspotted

Peters


&

Donoso-Barros,

narrow

postocular



stripe,

postocular

stripe,

no

white



1970;

Ripa,


1994

white


border

border


Anterior

lateral


blotches

Rhomboid


Rhomboid

Vertical


bars

Vertical


bars

Ripa,


1994

Head


shape

Small,


thin

Small,


thin

Large,


blunt

Large,


blunt

Ripa,


1994

Body


shape

Round


Round

Laterally

compressed

Laterally

compressed

Ripa,


1994

Anterior


surface

of

palatine



Concave

Unknown


Concave

Straight


Solo

´rzano


&

Cerdas,


1986;

bone


Greene,

unpublished

data

Defensive



behaviour

Usually


calm

Usually


calm

Aggressive

Usually

calm


Solo

´rzano


&

Cerdas,


1986;

Ripa,


1994

K. R. ZAMUDIO AND H. W. GREENE

438


Amazonian snake, these are well di

fferentiated lineages, the result of an ancient

divergence from South American populations and subsequent diversification within

Central America. Lachesis stenophrys and especially L. melanocephala have extremely

small overall distributions (Campbell & Lamar, 1989; Greene & Campbell, 1992),

and both are restricted to relatively undisturbed tropical wet forests (Vial & Jı´menez-

Porras, 1967; Solo´rzano & Cerdas, 1986). Each species occurs within the Costa

Rican National Parks system (e.g. L. stenophrys at the La Selva Biological Preserve

and adjacent lower reaches of Braulio Carillo National Park, L. melanocephala in

Corcovado National Park), but outside of those and other reserves within their

distributions, most remaining low and middle elevation forest has been converted

to agriculture (e.g. Monge-Na´jera, 1994). The range of each of these snake taxa is

already severely fragmented by habitat destruction, and each species is undoubtedly

subject to persecution by humans (e.g. wanton killing, commercial collecting).

Bushmasters clearly warrant special consideration from wildlife agencies in Costa

Rica, Nicaragua, Panama, and perhaps elsewhere.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This study was made possible by the contribution of tissue samples from private

and institutional collections, including D.R. Boyer (Dallas Zoo), H. Suzuki and F.

Furtado (Instituto Butantan, Brazil), and D. Ripa. We also thank J.A. Campbell, A.

Meyer, J.L. Patton, J.W. Sites Jr, R.B. Huey, and two anonymous reviewers for

helpful comments on the manuscript; K. Rassmann for a preprint of her paper and

comments on the manuscript; R.I. Crombie for sharing his extensive field experience

with neotropical snakes; N.C. Arens for tutoring us on the geological and floristic

history of South America; R.H. Ward (University of Utah) for generously facilitating

the molecular aspects of this project; and L. Waits and L. Morrison for company

and support in the laboratory. Partial financial support was provided by the D.

Snyder Fund for graduate research, University of Washington; a Sigma Xi Grant-

in-Aid of research; a University of Washington Minority Education Division Fel-

lowship; and a National Science Foundation Pre-doctoral Fellowship to K.Z.

REFERENCES


Yüklə 378,15 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə