Nc state university floriculture e-gro alert Bright-orange spore pustules



Yüklə 0,56 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix04.07.2017
ölçüsü0,56 Mb.

Volume 2, Number 7  February 2013

NC STATE UNIVERSITY

Floriculture

e-GRO Alert



Bright-orange  spore  pustules 

on  the  leaf  underside  denote 

rust disease. 

A grower called and reported red 

growth  on  the  underside  of  ox-

alis leaves.  The problem turned 

out to be rust (Puccinia oxalidis).   

This  disease  attacks  both  red 

leaf  types  (Oxalis  triangularis

and green leaf types (Oxalis reg-



nellii) of oxalis.

From  the  top,  the  pale  white 

sign of the disease, especially on 

red leaf types (Figure 1).  A clos-

er  inspection  of  the  undersides 

of the white spots one will notice 

bright-yellow  to  bright-orange 

spore pustules of the rust (Figure 

2).    The  pustules  can  also  form 

concentric  rings  on  the  leaf  un-

derside (Figure 3).  Figure 4 illus-

trates rust on a green leaf cultivar 

in the garden with light yellow to 

tan  spots  on  the  top  of  the  leaf 

and red pustules on the bottom.  

Oxalis Rust

Brian E. Whipker, North Carolina State University

(bwhipker@ncsu.edu)

With  advanced  symptoms,  leaf 

death occurs (Figure 5). 

Margery  Daughtrey  (2005)  re-

ported  that  the  alternate  host  is 

Oregon  grape  (Berberis  spp.).  

In addition, this rust disease can 

spread  to  oxalis  weeds  [Yellow 

wood sorrel (Oxalis stricta)] com-

monly found in greenhouses and 

can  infect  future  crops  of  sham-

rocks.  Therefore it is important to 

eradicate oxalis weed species in 

the greenhouse. 



Figure 1. Pale, white spots on the upper leaf surface are the ini-

tial sign of rust.

©Brian Whipker 

2

Volume 2, Number 7

e-GRO Alert - 2013

Management.

Once an oxalis plant has rust, it 

-

move  severely  infected  plants  if 



the problem is not wide spread.

So  what  crop  protection  chemi-

cals  work?      To  answer  this, 

turned  to  an  expert,  Rick  Yates 

-

ery Supplies.  Rick states "Oxalis 



e-GRO Alert

Volume 2, Number 7

February 2013

www.e-gro.org

CONTRIBUTORS

Dr. Nora Catlin

Floriculture Specialist

Cornell Cooperative Extension -

Suffolk County

nora.catlin@cornell.edu

Dan Gilrein

Entomology Specialist

Cornell Cooperative Extension -

Suffolk County

dog1@cornell.edu

Dr. Brian Krug

Floriculture Ext. Specialist

Univ. New Hampshire

brian.krug@unh.edu

Dr. Joyce Latimer

Floriculture Extension & Research

Virginia Tech University 

jlatime@vt.edu

Dr. Roberto Lopez

Floriculture Extension Specialist & 

Research


Purdue University

rglopez@purdue.edu

Dr. Paul Thomas

Floriculture Extension & Research

University of Georgia

pathomas@uga.edu

Dr. Brian Whipker

Floriculture Extension & Research

NC State University

brian_whipker@ncsu.edu

Copyright © 2013

Permission is hereby given to reprint articles 

appearing in this Bulletin provided the 

following reference statement appears with 

the reprinted article:  Reprinted from the 

e-GRO Alert.

Where  trade  names,  proprietary  products,  or 

is intended and no endorsement, guarantee or 

warranty is implied by the authors, universities 

or associations. 

In cooperation with our local and state greenhouse organizations

rust  is  much  easier  to  prevent 

than eradicate. Regular scouting 

is essential so that outbreaks are 

caught early when they are most 

treatable. 

Strobiluron  fungicides  such  as 

Pageant

®

  Intrinsic™  at  12  ounc-

es  per  100  gals  or  Heritage

®

  at 

4  ounces  per  100  gallons  can 

be used as preventatives. At the 

2013

Sponsor

Figure 2. Inspecting the leaf undersides will reveal orange pustules.

©Brian Whipker 


3

e-GRO Alert - 2013

Volume 2, Number 7

Probably  the  main  disorder  in 

interveinal  chlorosis  (Figure  6) 

of  the  youngest  leaves  caused 

-

ther  high  substrate  pH  (>7.0)  or 



over-irrigating  the  plants  (which 

leads to compromised roots and 

negatively  impedes  uptake  of 

iron).    For  additional  information 

with excellent color photographs, 

please refer to the GPN article by 

Chad Miller and Bill Miller (http://

www.gpnmag.com/still-keeping-

shamrocks-green).

Distinctive  yellow  ringspots  (Fig-



Figure 3. Concentric rings of pustules typically form on the leaf undersides.  (Better examples of 

concentric rings can be found on the internet. )

®

  can 

be used at 8 ounces per 100 gal-

lons with CapSil

®

 at 8 ounces per 

100 gallons. Make 2 applications 

®

 kills 

spores  on  contact  and  also  pro-

vides  a locally  systemic residual 

without  the  stunting  that  some-

times  is  seen  with  similar  prod-

ucts. 

Any  pesticide  that  you  have  not 

previously used under your con-

ditions  should  be  trialed  on  a 

limited  basis  for plant  safety be-

fore  large  scale  applications  are 

made. Read and follow the pes-

ticide label. Pesticides other than 

those  mentioned  may  be  safe, 

legal and effective."

Also  remember  to  scout  the 

greenhouse  and  control  any  ox-

alis  weeds  that  can  harbor  the 

disease.

Other Oxalis Problems.

While  the  orange  pustules  on 

the bottom of the leaves, help in 

the diagnosis of rust, there are a 

number  of  other  disorders  that 

you need to be aware of with ox-

alis.  

©Brian Whipker 


4

Volume 2, Number 7

e-GRO Alert - 2013

ure  7)  can  also  occur  and  is 

caused  by  the  chlorotic  ringspot 

virus (http://sdb.im.ac.cn/vide/de-

scr719.htm).  This virus is spread 

by aphids.

In  the  Holland  Bulb  Forcer’s 

Guide  (1996),  page  C-135,  Dr. 

DeHertogh  also  lists  leaf  edge 

burning,  leaf  wrinkling,  leaf 

bronzing, leaf greening, and leaf 

spotting  can  occur,  although  no 

known cause is reported for any 

of these disorders.



Key Points.

Orange  pustules  on  the  under-

side  of  oxalis  leaves  denote  a 

rust disease.   Interveinal  chloro-

sis  of  the  upper  foliage  denote 

caused by multiple problems.



Additional Resources.

There  are  few  online  resources 

with  details  about  the  disease, 

host range, and how it is spread.  

Below is one from 2005 by Mar-

gery  Daughtrey  of  Cornell  Uni-

versity.

Daughtrey, M. 2005.  Don’t let rust 

pounce on your Oxalis. Northeast 

Greenhouse IPM Notes. Volume 

15(3):3.

  

Figure 4.  View of a green leaf cultivar with yellowish-tan up-



per leaf spots and orange pustules on the lower leaf surface. 

This plant was in a garden in Normandy.

Figure 5.  With advancement of the disease in the landscape, 

leaf death can occur.

©Brian Whipker 

©Brian Whipker 

5

e-GRO Alert - 2013

Volume 2, Number 7

Figure 6. Intervienal chlorosis of the youngest leaves caused by a lack of iron, due to elevelated 

substrate pH levels, over irrigation, cold growing or impaired roots.

Figure 7. Yellow ringspots caused by chlorotic ringspot virus.

©Brian Whipker 

©Brian Whipker 


Yüklə 0,56 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə