Newsletter of the Kwongan Foundation : 3 June 2013 Kwongan Vision



Yüklə 3,05 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/3
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü3,05 Mb.
1   2   3

The Chamelaucium cohort

The family  Myrtaceae is the second largest 

in Australia,  and arguably  the most  iconic. 

The  eucalypts  form  one  of  the  largest 

tribes  of  Myrtaceae,  but  they  are 

outstripped  in  species  numbers  in  the 

south-west  by  the  small-flowered  tribe 

Chamelaucieae.  Perhaps  the  extensive 

areas of 

kwongan


 help to explain the great 

success  of  Chamelaucieae  here,  when  in 

northern  and  south-eastern  Australia  the 

eucalypts far outnumber them. 

In  the  south-west  of  Western  Australia, 

there  are  approximately  600  species 

currently  recognised in the Chamelaucium 

tribe,  giving  a  reasonably  large  sample  to 

provide  some  statistics  on  the  rate  of 

occupation  of  various   kinds  of  habitats 

(Table 2)

Habitat

Taxa

%

Kwongan taxa

 mostly or entirely on 

sandplain or dunes

 255


38.8

 partially on sandplain or 

dunes


 150

22.7


 total

405


61.4

Non-kwongan taxa

 associated with salt lakes

  14

  2.1


 associated with fresh-

water habitats

  63

  9.5


 sandstone or limestone

  16


  2.4

 granite sheets and outcrops

  56

  8.5


 lateritic/ironstone

  41


  6.2

 miscellaneous other 

habitats


  65

 10.0


 total

255


38.6

Table  2.    Approximate  numbers  of  south-

western   species  and  subspecies  of  Myrtaceae 

tribe  Chamelaucieae   in  kwongan   and  non-

kwongan habitats.

10

Figure  2.  Jewel  beetle  on  Scholtzia.                    



Photo by Jean Hort

Approximately  60%  of  the  species  and 

subspecies  occur  partly  to  entirely  in 

sandy 

kwongan


  habitats.  This   estimate 

excludes  species  on  more  specialised 

habitats  that  occur  within  the  kwongan 

regions,  shown  in  Hopper  and  Gioia’s 

(2004)  map,  such  as  plants  associated 

with  salt  lakes  (2%)  and  some  of  those 

found on granite sheets or outcrops. If  the 

latter  species   were  included  in  the 

percentage  estimate,  it  would  then  agree 

very well with Hopper and Gioia’s  estimate 

of  70% of  the  south-west’s flora occurring 

in 


kwongan

.

Where there are flowers ….

Any  proliferation  of  flowering  plants  is 

accompanied  by  a  great  diversity  of 

insects  and  other  animals.  Hubregtse 

(2005,  2007)  recorded about  130 types of 

animals from 15 different  orders  visiting  a 

single  plant  of  Thryptomene  grown  in  a 

garden  in  eastern  Australia.  In  its  native 

environment  in  south-western  Australia, 

this shrub would surely  attract many  more 

animal species.  

The  most  obvious  insect  visitors  are  the 

potential  pollinators,  such  as  beetles 

(Figure  2),  butterflies  (Figure  3),  bugs 

(Figure  4)  and  flies  (Figure  5).  In  tribe 

Chamelaucieae the insect visitors feed not 

only  on  nectar  and  pollen but  also on  oily 

substances  that  hold  the  pollen  in  sticky 

globules  (see  Figure  4),  increasing  both 

the attraction  and  portability  of  the pollen. 

Some predators live in or near the flowers, 

such as the spider shown in Figure 3 with 

its insect prey.



Figure  5a  and  b.  Trigger  plant  (Stylidium). 

a .  A  m a g n e t  f o r  m a n y  f l i e s .                                     

b.  Pollen  deposited  on  the  back  of  a  fly.                                            

Photos by Jean Hort

H o w e v e r,  i t  i s   t h e  s m a l l e r,  l e s s 

conspicuous  insect  life  that  is  more  in 

11

Figure 3. Spider with its butterfly prey.



Photo by Jean Hort

Figure 4a. Top view of plant bug (family 

Miridae) feeding from a pollen globule on 

Baeckia sp. at Youndegin Hill

Figure 4b. Side view

Photos by Jean Hort

evidence  once  the  plants   have  been 

collected for herbaria.  Drying and pressing 

plant  specimens  is  actually  an  excellent 

way  to  preserve  much  of  the  associated 

fauna, especially  the scale-forming insects 

(Figures 6–8)  whose  larvae  feed  on  sap. 

There are also  many  kinds of  gall-forming 

insects, aphids, flower thrips etc. 

12

Figure 6. Various  scale forming insects on 

s t e m s  o f  M y r t a c e a e ,  t r i b e 

Chamelaucieae.

A . d i a s p i d  ( f a m i l y  D i a s p i d a e )  o n 

Hypocalymma angustifolium 

B.  female   felt  scale  (family  Eriococcidae) 

on Hypocalymma xanthopetalum

C. lac insects (family Kerridae) on Baeckea

D.psyllid  (superfamily  Psylloidea)  on 

Thryptomene decussata

Photos by Alex Williams

Figure 7.  Leaf-attached scales on 

Mrytaceae tribe Chamelaucieae

A. coccid (family Coccidae) on 

Hypocalymma cordifolium 

B. diaspid scale (family Diaspidae) on 

Hypocalymma cordifolium

C. diaspid scale resembling a poached egg 

(family Diaspidae) and rounded, black 

scale formed by whitefly (family 

Aleyrodidae) on Cyasthostemon 

heteranthus

D.  acutely-angled whitefly scale on 

Thryptomene mucronata

E. whitefly scale with glassy border on 

    Homalocalyx grandiflorus

F. white coated whitefly on Baeckea sp., 

Paynes Find ( S.J. Patrick 1095)

Photos by Alex Williams


C o n s e r v a t i o n  o f  t h e 

kwongan


 is vital  to preserve 

not  only  the  remarkable 

plants of this region but also 

the  more  numerous  and 

diverse  other  life  forms  co-

existing with them.



References

Hislop,  M.  & Rye,  B.L.  (2002). Three  new 

species  of  Petrophile  (Proteaceae)  from 

south-western Australia.  Nuytsia  14:  365–

374.

Hopper,  S.D.  &  Gioia,  P.  (2004).  The 



Southwest  Australian  Floristic  Region: 

evolution  and  conservation of  biodiversity. 



Annual  Review  of  Ecology,  Evolution  and 

Systematics 35: 632–650.

Hubregtse,  V.  (2005).  Bush  creatures: 

animals   observed  on  a  Thryptomene 

shrub.  The  Victorian  Naturalist  122:204–

208

Hubregtse,  V.  (2007).  More  animals  seen 



on  Thryptomene.  The  Victorian  Naturalist 

124: 262–264.

13

Figure 8. Various scale insects, mostly 

whiteflies ( family Aleyrodidae) on 

Proteaceae.

A. scale on Banksia grandis leaf

B,C. three kinds of scales on a single                

Banksia sessilis leaf

D. scale on Isopogon sp. Newdegate 

    (D.B. Foreman 771)

E. scale on Petrophile linearis leaf

Photos by Alex Williams


 

14

Section and species



Collection date

Flower

colour

Landform

sect. Arthrostiga

 P. brevifolia

23 October 1999

bright yellow

upland


 P. aff. brevifolia

25 August 2002 

pale yellow

valley bottom 



 P. linearis

23 October 1999

pink

upland


 P. megalostegia

13 September 1999 

yellow

lower slopes of valley 



 P. nivea

29 May, 9 July 1999 

white

upland


 P. pilostyla

10 July 1999

very pale yellow

upland 


sect. Cylindrostrobus

 P. macrostachya

24 October 1999

pale yellow

upland 


 P. shuttleworthiana

13 September 1999

cream and 

yellow


lower slopes of valley

sect. Petrophile 

 P. scabriuscula

10 July 1999

pale yellow

valley bottom 



sect. Serrurioides

 P. serruriae

13 September 1999 

yellow

lower slopes of valley 



 P. striata

13 September 1999

pale yellow

upland


unplaced

 P. aculeata 

24 October 1999

yellow

upland


 P. chrysantha

15 September 1999 

yellow

base of lateritic 



breakaway

Table 1. 

Petrophile species of the Warradage hot spot

Hans Lambers

 

Winthrop Professor,



School of Plant Biology, 

The University of Western Australia, 

Australia

South-western  Australia  was  a  part  of 

Gondwana  and  some of  the  most  ancient 

parts  of  the  Earth’s  crust  can  be  found 

here.  Other  parts  of  the  landscape 

originated  more  recently  from   calcareous 

marine  deposits.  Therefore,  the  soils  of 

Western  Australia  (WA)  are  amongst  the 

most  heavily  leached  and  nutrient-

impoverished  in  the  world.  Moreover,  the 

soils  on  lateritic  profiles   tightly  bind 

phosphate, so that, phosphorus (P) is also 

poorly  available  to  plants  that  are  not 

adapted  to  these  conditions.  The  old, 

climatically  buffered ancient landscapes of 

south-western Australia also comprise one 

of  the  world’s   hotspots  of  higher  plant 

s p e c i e s  d i v e r s i t y.  T h e r e f o r e ,  t h i s 

environment offers a unique opportunity  to 

study  plant  adaptations  to  nutrient-poor 

conditions.  

What is most intriguing is that the greatest 

higher  plant,  species diversity  is  found on 

the  most  P-impoverished  soils  on  the 

south-western Australian sandplains and is 

known as the kwongan  vegetation  (Figure 

1).  What  is  even  more  intriguing  is  that 

those  species  that  lack  mycorrhizal 

associations, which are considered to help 

the  plant  acquire  P  from  nutrient-poor 

soils,  are  found  predominantly  on  the 

poorest soils.   When soil P increases,  the 

Proteaceae peter out.  

There  is  an  important  message  for 

managers here:  don’t mess with soil  P, 

o r  y o u  w i l l  l o s e  y o u r  p r e c i o u s 

Proteaceae!

What  might  be  the  causes  of  increased 

soil  P  which  represents  a  threat  to  an 

iconic  component  of  our  kwongan  flora?  

Increased  fire  frequency  is  one  of  them, 

because burning  the vegetation  returns  P 

to  soil that  was  originally  locked  up in the 

vegetation. Run-off from farmland or urban 

activities  is  another  source.  Some  fire 

retardants contain P, and these should be 

avoided  in  severely  P-impoverished 

bushland in WA.  There are others  that can 

be included, but the only one I want to add 

to  the  list  here  is  the  use  of  phosphite.  

This  chemical  is  used  to  combat 

Phytophthora cinnamomi (dieback). In soil, 

microorganisms  quickly  convert  it  into 

phosphate.  

Since phosphite is used at a rate similar to 

that  which  farmers  use  in  the  wheatbelt, 

the  fertilising  effect  of  phosphite  spraying 

is  significant.  We  cannot  simply  stop 

spraying phosphite and let dieback spread.  

15

Mineral nutrition of Western 

Australian native plants in a 

Biodiversity Hotspot 

Banksia menziesii


However,  using  phosphite  cannot  be  a 

long-term solution  and phosphite must  be 

replaced  to  something  that  suits  our  P-

impoverished  landscapes  much  better.  

This  is   the  subject  of  ongoing  research 

efforts   at  The  University  of  Western 

Australia  (UWA)  and  Murdoch,  supported 

by  the  Department  of  Environment  and 

Conservation (DEC) and several partners.  

A  relatively  large  proportion  of  species 

from  the  P-poor  environments  in  south-

western  Australia  cannot  produce  an 

association  with  mycorrhizal  fungi  but 

instead,  produce  cluster  roots   (in  most 

Proteaceae  and  in  some  Fabaceae)  or 

dauciform  roots  (in  Cyperaceae).  These 

specialised roots  are an  adaptation both in 

structure and in  functioning.    Cluster-root-

bearing  Proteaceae  in  south-western 

A u s t r a l i a  o c c u r  o n  t h e  m o s t  P -

i m p o v e r i s h e d  s o i l s  ( F i g .  1 ) . T h e   

mycorrhizal Myrtaceae  tend  to inhabit  the 

less P-impoverished soils in this region.  

The  functioning  of  cluster  roots  in 

Proteaceae  and  Fabaceae  has  received 

considerable attention.   Dauciform roots in 

Cyperaceae have been  explored less,  but 

they  appear  to  function  in  a  very  similar 

manner.   The growth of specialised cluster 

roots or  dauciform roots in species of  the 

Cyperaceae, Fabaceae and Proteaceae is 

stimulated when plants are grown at a very 

low P supply, and suppressed when leaf  P 

c o n c e n t r a t i o n s  i n c r e a s e .  T h e s e 

specialised  roots  are  all  short-lived 

structures and they  release large amounts 

of carboxylates during an ‘exudative burst’, 

at  rates  that  are  considerably  faster  than 

reported  for  non-specialised  roots  of  a 

wide  range of  species.    Carboxylates are 

organic  anions as found in  citric  acid  and 

malic acid. The carboxylates play  a pivotal 

role  in  ‘mining’ P  that  is sorbed  onto  soil 

particles.

Because  the  world  P  reserves  are  being 

depleted  whilst  vast  amounts  of  P  are 

stored in fertilised soils, there is a growing

need  for  crops with a  high  efficiency  of  P 

acquisition.

Root-cluster  morphology  of  Proteaceae  and 

Cyperaceae  species. In  A-F  plants were grown 

hydroponically at very low P supply (≤ 1 µM). 

(A)  Banksia  sessilis  (

parrot  bush

)  root  system 

with  “compound” “proteoid”  root clusters.  (`B) 

Hakea prostrata (harsh hakea) root system with 

“simple”  proteoid-root  clusters;  bar  is  30 mm. 

(C)  Tetraria  (sedge)  species  root  system  with 

“dauciform”  root  clusters.  (D)  Young, 

compound  proteoid-root-cluster  of  Banksia 

grandis (bull banksia) terminates with  3

rd

  order 

determinate,  branch  rootlets.  (E)  Simple 

proteoid-root  clusters  of  Hakea  sericea  (silky 

hakea)  at  various  stages  of  development, 

terminate  with  2

nd

  order  determinate  branch 

rootlets  (white  root  clusters  are  young  to 

mature, whereas brown  ones are senescent or 

dead).  (F)  Higher  magnification  of  dauciform-

roots clusters of Tetraria species in C. Root-hair 

density  is  extremely  high  on  individual 

dauciform  roots.  In  G  and  E,  simple  proteoid-

root clusters of  Hakea ceratophylla that tightly 

bind  the  sand  excavated  at  the  University  of 

Western  Australia’s  Alyson  Baird  Reserve  at 

Yule  Brook  (Western  Australia)  (courtesy  M.W. 

Shane, School of Plant Biology, the University of 

Western  Australia,  Perth,  Australia).  A-F: 

copyright Elsevier Science, Ltd.

Some Australian native species have traits 

that  would  be  highly  desirable  for  future 

16


crops.  The  possibilities  of  introducing  P-

acquisition  efficient  species  in  new 

cropping  and  pasture  systems  are 

currently being explored. 

 

Western  Australian  Banksia  species  are 



also  the  most  efficient  species studied  so 

far when it comes to using the P they  have 

acquired for their photosynthesis.

  

Therefore,  possible 



strategies  to  introduce 

traits associated with a 

high  P-use  efficiency 

i n t o  f u t u r e  c r o p 

s p e c i e s  a r e  a l s o 

considered promising.  

High  P-use  efficiency 

in Proteaceae includes 

a  h i g h l y  e f f i c i e n t 

mobilisation  of  P  from 

senescing leaves.

In  addition,  many  species   operate  at 

extremely  low  leaf  P  concentrations 

exhibiting  rates  of  photosynthesis  similar 

to crop plants. 

Expressed  per  unit  leaf  P,  their  rates  of 

photosynthesis are extraordinarily high.

  

Photos by Hans Lambers.



17

Figure  1.  Plant  diversity  and  soil  phosphorus status  in  south-western  Australia’s  global 

biodiversity hotspot.  Note the relative abundance of non-mycorrhizal species  on soils  with 

the lowest phosphorus (P) content.

0

10



20

30

40



50

60

















20



40

60

80



100

120


Total soil P 

(

mg kg



−1

)

Plant



 species

 richness

 

(

species



 100

 m

−2



)

Total



Mycorrhizal

Non−mycorrhizal (all)

Proteaceae

Banksia grandis


S

HOWCASE

A Botanical 

Jewel: 

The Anstey-

Keane 

Damplands in 

Perth Western 

Australia

Rod Giblett and David 

James

Photos by Bryony 



Fremlin

 

The Anstey-Keane dampland or heathland 



and  Bush  Forever  Site  (342)  in  Perth,  is 

the second most floristically  diverse of 500 

Bush  Forever  sites,  with  381  species  of 

native  flora.  According to Bush  Forever,  it 

is second  only  to  the  Greater  Brixton  St. 

site  in  terms of  number  of  species.    The 

site includes rare flora and two threatened 

ecological  communities.  It  is  located  in 

Jandakot  Regional  Park  in  Forrestdale 

within  the  City  of  Armadale  in  the  Perth 

south-eastern  metropolitan  area.  Two 

threatened  ecological  communities   have 

been  described  in  this  area.  They  are 

associated with seasonal wetlands. One of 

these  is endangered  type  10a,  described 

in  Bush  Forever,  ‘shrublands  on  dry  clay 

flats  and  the  other  is  vulnerable  type  8, 

‘herb  rich  shrublands  in  clay  pans’.  It 

should  be  nominated  to  the  Directory  of 

Important Wetlands in Australia.

Patersonia in Anstey-Keane Damplands


T h e  A n s t e y - K e a n e  d a m p l a n d  i n 

Forrestdale  also  has  more  species  of 

native flora than Kings  Park which has 293 

native  taxa  (plus  172  weed  taxa)  and 

which  is  Bush  Forever  site  317.    Kings 

Park  is  regarded  as  an  iconic  tourist 

destination  for  visitors  and  valued 

recreation  site  for  Perth  residents.  This 

year  it  was  crowded  with  many  people 

enjoying the picnic areas and the activities 

that  were  part  of  the  wildflower  festival, 

held for  six  weeks.   Kings  Park is notable 

for  the  many  species  of  native  flora 

common  to  the  area  and  for  its  botanical 

gardens that  showcase flora species from 

elsewhere  in  Western Australia.  Not  well-

known and certainly  not  as well-visited as 

Kings  Park,  is  Anstey-Keane  dampland 

with  its  botanical  treasures  and  rich 

biodiversity  and  flowers for  six  months  of 

the year. It too could be a valued park.

Yet  it  is  threatened  with  a  proposed  road  

through  the  middle  of  it.  It  is  also  being 

degraded  by  off-road  vehicle  use  and 

rubbish  dumping.  This   proposed  road 

would not only  destroy  the flora in the road 

reserve but  also seriously  compromise the 

f a u n a ,  i n c l u d i n g  b a n d i c o o t s  a n d 

kangaroos,  that  live in  the  site and  cross 

the road reserve.

From  Anstey  Road  the  heathland  is  flat 

and the vegetation is low. It stretches north 

and  south  from  Armadale  Road  in  the 

south  to  Ranford  Road  to  the  north.  The 

land  is  flat  with  barely  a  rise  or  fall.  The 

trees are  short  and  the bushes and other 

vegetation  are  low.  One  nearby  resident 

calls  the  area  ‘scrub,’  implying  that  its 

vegetation is worthless.  The vegetation  is 

certainly  not  tall,  grand  and  uplifting  like 

forest, nor like picturesque ‘bush’. Much of 

its vegetation,  however,  is small, exquisite 

and valuable in its own right.

  

Many  of the species are found in the lower 



and  wetter  land  summed  up  nicely  as 

‘dampland’.  Moisture  is  diffused  through 

the  land  and  not  usually  visible  on  the 

surface. The wetness  of the land is usually 

inferred only  from the types of plants  that it 

19


supports.  Dampland  is   thus  unlike  other 

w e t l a n d s ,  s u c h  a s  t h e  n e a r b y, 

internationally  significant Forrestdale Lake, 

with its large body  of open shallow water in 

winter and spring, but that usually dries  out 

in  summer.  Damplands  are  moist  basins 

covered  with  plants.  They  have  been 

defined  by  the  V  and  C  Semeniuk 

R e s e a r c h  G r o u p  a s  ‘ s e a s o n a l l y 

waterlogged basins’ that ‘support rich plant 

and  animal  communities’.  The  types   of 

plants  found  in  damplands  depend  on 

moisture  close  to the  surface  of  the  land. 

As  many  of  these  plants  are  short,  and 

ground-hugging,  the  area  is  often  called 

heathland,  though  there  are  also 

sedgelands and herblands in the area.

Before  European  settlement  these  once 

floristically-rich damplands occurred all the 

way  from  Pinjarra  in  the  south,  to  the 

southern  Perth  metropolitan  area.  The 

sandy,  clay  soils of  these flat  damplands, 

called the Pinjarra  Plain,  have resulted in 

the  evolution  over  thousands  of  years  of 

their  unique vegetation. The northernmost 

tip of the Pinjarra Plain is wedged between 

the Bassendean Dune complex to the west 

and  the  Wungong  River  to  the  east.  

Confined  almost  solely  to the east  side  of 

the  Swan  Coastal Plain  the  Pinjarra  Plain 

was  highly  suitable  as  good  agricultural 

land  and  so  has  been  almost  entirely 

cleared.  With the removal of almost all the 

native  vegetation  for  farming,  the  only 

places it  can be found today  are along the 

Perth-Bunbury  railway  line,  road  verges 

(such  as   Mundijong  Road),  nature 

reserves,  remnants  on  private  property, 

and  two  large  areas  in  Forrestdale, 

including the east side of Forrestdale Lake 

Nature  Reserve  and  the  Anstey-Keane 

damplands.

Professor  Stephen  Hopper,  Professor  at 

the University  of  Western Australia, former 

Director  of  Kings   Park  and  Botanic 

Gardens and an eminent botanist said:

‘Ephemeral  wetlands  are  a  special 

favourite  of  mine.  I  have  worked in 

particular  on  gnammas  on  granite 

outcrops  since  the  1970s,  as   well 

as  being  actively  involved  in  rare 

flora  conservation  for  damplands, 

and  in  helping  securing  Brixton  St, 

Kenwick  as  a  reserve  when  I 

worked  in  CALM  [now  DEC].  Such 

damplands  are  truly  unsung 

biodiversity  jewels  of  international 

significance,  at  risk  from  many 

perspectives.  Perth  itself  is  one  of 

the most  biodiverse cities on Earth, 

and its  ephemeral damplands are at 

the  sharp  edge  of  conservation 

concern  given  their  rarity  and 

vulnerability. In this context putting a 

road  through  the  Anstey-Keane 

damplands  would  be  ill-advised 

indeed  when  suitable  alternatives 

could be implemented.’

(CALM  =  Department  of  Conservation  and 

Land Management  now  termed  Department of 

Environment and Conservation [DEC])

The  exceptional  shrub  species  found  at 

Anstey-Keane include: swamp fox  banksia 

B a n k s i a  t e l m a t i a e a ) ;  o n e - s i d e d 

bottlebrush  (Calothamnus  hirsutus); 

20

Regelia ciliata



Lobelia

s w a m p  c y p r e s s  ( A c t i n o s t r o b u s 

pyramidalis);  sand  bottlebrush  (Beaufortia 

squarrossa);  and  Regelia  ciliata  which 

provides  important  habitat  for  southern-

brown  bandicoot,  or  quenda  (Isoodon 

obesulus),  as  it  provides dense  cover  for 

this secretive and vulnerable animal. 

Because  of  its  size  this  area  supports  a 

rich representation  of  birds and  mammals 

including  the  western  grey  kangaroo 

(Macropus fuliginosus). Several species  of 

birds   are  attracted  to  the  flowering 

heathland  shrubs  such  as  the  white-

cheeked  honeyeater  (Phylidonyris  nigra), 

tawny  crowned  honeyeater  (Phylidonyris 



melanops),  along  with  insectivorus  birds 

such  as the  splendid  blue  wren  (Malurus 



splendens),  white-winged  triller  (Lalage 

sueurii),  and  black-faced  wood  swallow 

(Artamus  cinereus).  Raptors  include  the 

little  eagle  (Hieraaetus  morphnoides), 

wedged-tail  eagle  (Aquila  audax)  and 

nankeen kestrel (Falco cenchroides). 

Several  species  of  melaleucas  are  also 

found in this dampland, including robin red 

breast  bush  (Melaleuca  lateritia)  and 

s a l t w a t e r  p a p e r b a r k  ( M e l a l e u c a 

cuticularis),  more  commonly  found  closer 

to  the  coast.  Lower  ground  cover  plants 

are  icons  of  the  area  with  exceptional 

colour in  spring.  Some  highlights  found in 

the  dampland  are:  woolly  dragons 

(Pityrodia  uncinata),  the  southernmost 

population of  this species according to the 

Bush  Forever  site  description;  Petrophile 



seminuda);  basket  flower  (Adenanthos 

obovatus);  swamp  pea  (Euchilopsis 

linearis)  and  stinkwood  (Jacksonia 

sternbergiana).  Many  herbaceous species 

found  here show themselves each  spring. 

Many  species  of  orchids   occur  here 

including  purdies  donkey  orchid  (Diuris 



purdiei),  a  declared  rare  flora  (DRF) 

s p e c i e s .  G r e e n  k a n g a r o o  p a w s 

(Anigozanthos  viridis)  are  endemic  to 

these damp areas (that is,  found nowhere 

e l s e ) .  C a r p e t s  o f  p i n k  p e t t i c o a t s 

(Polypompholyx mutifida) appear here and 

give  an  extra  blaze  of  colour.  Many 

sundews (Drosera  spp)  are  also  pink  and 

give an exceptional splash of colour.

21

Pityrodia uncinata



Ornduffia submersa

Cutting  a  jewel  in  half  makes  it  relatively 

worthless.  The  same  would  apply  to  the 

Anstey-Keane Bush Forever site.

The larger an area of conserved bushland, 

the  more  viable  it  is  for  the  plant  and 

animal  communities  that  inhabit  it.  The 

shorter the length of boundaries it has, the 

less  opportunity  there  is  for  the  ‘edge-

effect’  of  weeds,  disease  and  human 

incursions. The area where Keane Road is 

proposed to go through has recently  been 

surveyed as  the most  pristine of  the entire 

Bush Forever site.

Environmental  consultants  ‘Enviroworks’ 

a r e  c u r r e n t l y  p r e p a r i n g  a  P u b l i c 

Environmental  Review  (PER)  of  the 

proposed road. 

This will  be  released  for  public  comment 

soon.  

Rod  Giblett



  is  Secretary  of  the  Friends  of 

Forrestdale  and  Associate  Professor  in  the 

School  of  Communications  and  Arts,  Edith 

Cowan  University.  He  is  the  author  of  many 

books  including  Forrestdale:  People  and 

place; People and places of nature and culture; 

and Black swan lake: Life of  a wetland . He is 

also  co-editor  with  Hugh  Webb  of  Western 

Australian wetlands: The Kimberley and south-

west  and  co-author  with  Hugh  of  ‘Western 

Australian  Wetlands:  Living  Water  or  Useless 

Swamps?’ Habitat, 21(3), 1993, 30-36.

David  James

  is  President  of  the  Friends  of 

Forrestdale  and  a  well-known  naturalist.  He 

has  lived  in  Forrestdale  all  his life.  His  story 

and  those  of  other  long-time  former  and 

present residents can be  found in  Forrestdale: 

People and place.

22

Dampiera



Hibbertia stellaris


Yüklə 3,05 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə