Nutrition in Diabetes



Yüklə 0,75 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/2
tarix02.01.2022
ölçüsü0,75 Mb.
#42558
  1   2
hamdy2016



N u t r i t i o n i n D i a b e t e s

Osama Hamdy,

MD, PhD

a

,



*

, Mohd-Yusof Barakatun-Nisak,

PhD

b

,



c

INTRODUCTION

Nutrition therapy is keystone of diabetes prevention and management and its impor-

tance has long been recognized before the era of modern scientific medicine.

1

Before


insulin discovery, a starvation diet of very low caloric content (400–500 calories/day),

known as the Allen diet, was commonly used to treat diabetes.

2

Another diet with



extreme carbohydrate restriction to approximately 2% and very high fat to approxi-

mately 70% was used by Elliot P. Joslin for managing diabetes in the 1920s.

3

Although


there was no clear distinction between what is known now as type 1 and type 2 dia-

betes (T2D), those eccentric diets were remarkably successful in managing diabetes

and for even keeping patients with type 1 diabetes alive for a few years.

2,4


At that time,

diabetes was commonly defined as carbohydrate-intolerance disease.

5

After insulin



discovery, the amount of carbohydrates in the diabetes diet was increased to a

maximum of 35% to 40% of the total daily caloric intake. By the late 1970s, a strong

claim to reduce total fat and dietary saturated fat (SFAs) intake was made due to

increased incidence of cardiovascular death, particularly in patients with diabetes.

6

Reduction of fat intake by approximately 10% required a compensatory increase in



Disclosure Statement: O. Hamdy is on the advisory board of Novo-Nordisk, Metagenics Inc,

Astra Zeneca Inc, and Boeringher Inglehiem Inc, and is a consultant to Merck Inc. B.-N. Yusof

has nothing to disclose.

a

Department of Endocrinology, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, One Joslin



Place, Boston, MA 02481, USA;

b

Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA



02215, USA;

c

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences,



Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor 43400, Malaysia

* Corresponding author.

E-mail address:

Osama.hamdy@joslin.harvard.edu

KEYWORDS

 Medical nutrition therapy  Nutrition  Diet  Glycemic index  Diabetes

KEY POINTS

 Medical nutrition therapy is effective in improving glycemic control, promoting weight loss,

and modifying cardiovascular risk factors in patients with diabetes.

 Reduction of carbohydrate load, selection of low glycemic index food, and balancing

macronutrients improve postprandial blood glucose levels.

 Selection of healthful dietary patterns, such as the Mediterranean diet or DASH diet, are

beneficial in managing diabetes.

Endocrinol Metab Clin N Am 45 (2016) 799–817

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecl.2016.06.010

endo.theclinics.com

0889-8529/16/

ª 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.




other nutrients, and in this case it was dietary carbohydrates, which went up to

approximately 55% to 60% (

Fig. 1

).

7



Although a high carbohydrate diet has been frequently questioned as a major

contributing factor to poor diabetes control and weight gain, little has changed for

the past 3 decades.

8

Recently, the importance of specific foods and overall dietary



patterns rather than a single isolated nutrient for managing diabetes and cardiovascu-

lar diseases (CVD) has emerged.

9,10

This review article discusses the current evidence



around the role of nutrition in diabetes management.

MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY FOR DIABETES MANAGEMENT

In 1994, the American Dietetic Association used the term “medical nutrition therapy”

(MNT) to better articulate appropriate nutrition care and process in diabetes manage-

ment.

11

MNT can be described as intensive, focused, and structured nutrition therapy



that helps in changing the eating behavior of patients with diabetes. Despite recent

progress in pharmacologic management of diabetes, MNT remains a crucial tool for

achieving optimal glycemic control.

12

Although MNT is widely recognized by major diabetes organizations across the



world, their dietary recommendations are slightly different (

Table 1


). In principle, the

prime goal of MNT is to attain and maintain optimal glycemic control and metabolic

improvement through healthy food choices while considering patients’ personal

needs, preferences, and lifestyle patterns.

13

Proper MNT was shown to reduce A1C



by 0.5% to 2% in patients with T2D and by 0.3% to 1% in patients with type 1 dia-

betes.


14

MNT was also shown to be particularly beneficial after initial diabetes diag-

nosis and in patients with poor glycemic control. Nevertheless, its effectiveness is

evident at any A1C level across the entire course of the disease.

13

Practically, MNT remains the most challenging component of diabetes self-



management by most patients. To enhance dietary adherence, an individualized

MNT should be provided by registered dietitians or by health care providers who

are well versed in nutrition. Comprehensive evaluation of the individual eating pattern,

needs, nutrition status, weight history, and history of previous nutrition education are

required before recommending an MNT plan.

12

Fig. 1. Trend in macronutrient intake among adults with diabetes in the United States be-



tween 1988 and 2004. (Data from Oza-Frank R, Cheng YJ, Narayan KMV, et al. Trends in

nutrient intake among adults with diabetes in the United States: 1988-2004. J Am Diet Assoc

2009;109(7):1173–8.)

Hamdy & Barakatun-Nisak

800



Table 1

A comparison of key recommendation of medical nutrition therapy for people with type 2

diabetes

ADA 2014/2016

1,12

CDA 2013


17

Joslin Guideline

16

Calorie intake



Recommend

reduced energy

intake to promote

weight loss in

overweight/obese

adults.


Recommend a

nutritionally

balanced calorie-

reduced diet.

Recommend reduce daily

caloric intake between

250 and 500 calories for

overweight/obese

individuals. Meal

replacement that matches

the nutrition guideline

can be used to initiate and

maintain weight loss.

Macronutrient

distribution

No recommendation

on specific

macronutrient

distribution. It

should be

individualized to

meet calorie

intake and

metabolic goals.

Recommend 44%–60%

carbohydrate,

15%–20% protein,

20%–35% total fat

with consideration

for individualization

Recommend 40%–45%

carbohydrate, 20%–30%

protein, and <35% total

fat with adjustment

should be made to meet

the cultural and food

preference of individual.

Eating pattern

Recommend a

variety of eating

patterns with

consideration of

personal

preference.

Recommend a variety

of dietary patterns

with consideration

on personal

preference, values,

and abilities.

Not available.

Dietary


carbohydrate

Recommend

carbohydrate

intake from whole

grains, vegetables,

fruits, legumes,

and dairy products

with emphasis on

foods lower in

glycemic load.

Recommend food with

a low GI value.

Recommend foods with a

low GI value, such as

whole grains, legumes,

fruits, green salad with

olive oil–based dressing

and most vegetables.

Limit consumption

of refined carbohydrates,

processed grains, and

starchy foods, especially

most pastas, white bread,

white rice, low-fiber

cereal, and white

potatoes.

Dietary fiber

Emphasis on foods

with higher fiber.

Recommend higher

fiber/whole grains

than general

population (25–50 g

per day or 15–25 per

1000 kcal).

Recommend

w14 g fiber/

1000 calories (20–35 g) per

day. If tolerated,

w50 g/


d is effective in improving

postprandial

hyperglycemia and should

be encouraged.

Sucrose and

fructose


Recommend to limit

intake of sucrose-

containing foods

and to avoid

sugar-sweetened

beverages.

Added sugar can be

substituted for other

carbohydrates in

mixed meals up to

maximum of 10%

total caloric intake.

Recommend to limit

consumption of sugar and

sugary beverages.

(continued on next page)

Nutrition in Diabetes

801



Table 1

(continued )

ADA 2014/2016

1,12


CDA 2013

17

Joslin Guideline



16

Protein


Do not recommend

reducing protein

intake below daily

allowance of

0.8 g/kg body

weight including

those with

diabetes or kidney

disease.

Recommend as for

general population

(1.0–1.5 g/kg body

weight). Consider

restricting to

0.8 g kg/body weight

for those with

chronic kidney

disease.


Recommend protein intake

of not <1.2 g/kg of

adjusted body weight

a

for



overweight/obese

patients. Patients with

signs of kidney disease

should get a consult from

nephrologist before

increasing protein intake.

Protein can be modified

but not lowered to a level

that may increase the risk

of malnutrition or

hypoalbuminemia.

Dietary fat

Recommend intake

of total fat, SFA,

cholesterol, and

transfat as for the

general

population (total

fat between 20%

and 35%,


SFA <10%).

Support eating

plan with key

element of a

Mediterranean-

style diet over low

in total fat and

high in


carbohydrates.

Encourage eating

food rich in long-

chain omega 3

fatty acids but no

support for

omega-3

supplements.

Recommend SFA

restriction to <7%

and limit transfat to

a minimum level.

Encourage food rich

in MUFA and PUFA

up to 20% and 10%,

respectively.

Emphasis on quality of fat

rather than quantity.

Recommend SFA to <7%

and limit foods high in

transfats. PUFA and MUFA

should comprise the rest

of fat intake.

Micronutrient

supplements

No support for

vitamin and

mineral


supplements.

No support for routine

vitamin and mineral

supplements.

No support for routine

vitamin and mineral

supplements.

Alcohol


Advised to drink in

moderation. As

alcohol may

increase the risk

for delayed

hypoglycemia,

education and

awareness should

be emphasized.

Advised as per general

population with

consideration on the

same precautions.

Advise for moderate

consumption. If

consumed, no more than

1 drink

b

for women and



no more than 2 drinks per

day for men.

(continued on next page)

Hamdy & Barakatun-Nisak

802



Macronutrient Recommendations

Dietary carbohydrates

There is no final or conclusive evidence for an ideal macronutrient proportion for all pa-

tients with T2D, but rather there is an emphasis on individualization of eating plan (see

Table 1

).

1,12,15



The Canadian Diabetes Association and the Joslin Nutrition Guidelines

for overweight and obese patients with T2D provide some specific macronutrient dis-

tribution. Both point to the prime importance of macronutrient composition in a dia-

betes nutrition plan because carbohydrates, proteins, and fat have differential

impact on blood glucose levels.

They recommended reduction in the total glycemic load (GL) of carbohydrates and

their glycemic index (GI) (see

Table 1


).

16,17


Others also made a strong case for

reducing carbohydrates in a diabetes diet.

8

Meanwhile, a recent randomized



controlled study showed that A1C and weight reduction were comparable between

calorie-restricted low-carbohydrate and high-carbohydrate diets at 24 and 52 weeks,

but a low-carbohydrate diet, which was also high in unsaturated fat and low in satu-

rated fat, achieved greater improvements in the lipid profile, blood glucose stability,

and reductions in diabetes medications, suggesting it as an effective strategy for

the optimizing T2D management.

18

Lowering GL by modest restriction of total carbo-



hydrates to approximately 40% to 45% of the total daily caloric intake with favoring

carbohydrates of lower GI also showed better effect on blood glucose levels in pa-

tients with T2D in comparison with conventional high-carbohydrate meal plans.

19,20


In the real world, foods with low GI property are often high in dietary fiber and whole

grains, which also improve overall diet quality.

21

Increased dietary fiber intake has been strongly recommended as part of diabetes



management due to its benefit in inducing satiety,

22

increasing gastrointestinal transit



time, and improving overall blood glucose level.

23

Approximately 14 g of fiber per 1000



calories or approximately 20 to 35 g per day is recommended (see

Table 1


). Approxi-

mately 50 g fiber per day, if tolerated, is effective in improving postprandial hyperglyce-

mia.

16,17


Dietary fiber from unprocessed food, such as vegetables, fruits, seeds, nuts,

and legumes, is preferred, but if needed, fiber supplement, such as psyllium, resistant

starch, and

b-glucan can be added to reach the total dietary fiber requirement.

16

Limiting added sugars has been consistently recommended by most organizations



(see

Table 1


).

12,16,17


Excessive intake of high-fructose sweetened beverages

Table 1


(continued )

ADA 2014/2016

1,12

CDA 2013


17

Joslin Guideline

16

Sodium


Recommend as for

the general

population

(<2300 mg/d) with

further reduction

is to be


individualized.

No specific cutoffs

recommended but

emphasized on

DASH eating plan.

Recommend <2300 mg (

w1

tsp of salt) per day.



Abbreviations: ADA, American Diabetes Association; CDA, Canadian Diabetes Association; DASH,

Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension; GI, glycemic index; MUFA, monounsaturated fatty acids;

PUFA, polyunsaturated fatty acids; SFA, saturated fatty acids.

a

Adjusted body weight



5 IBW (Ideal Body Weight) 1 0.25 (Current Weight

IBW).


16

b

1 drink is equal to 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof



distilled alcohol.

16

Nutrition in Diabetes



803


adversely influenced visceral fat deposition, lipid metabolism, blood pressure, insulin

sensitivity, and de novo lipogenesis, in particular among overweight and obese pa-

tients.

24

The use of non-nutritive sweeteners may provide short-term benefits, but



their long-term effects warrant future investigation.

25

Dietary fats



In general, the type of fat is more important than the amount of fat intake. Now, it is

clear that putting a limit on total fat (eg, <30%) and dietary cholesterol (<300 mg/d)

have no substantial benefit on cardiovascular risk. This is in line with the recent recom-

mendations of the Dietary Guideline for Americans,

26

American Diabetes Associa-



tion,

12

and American Heart Association.



27

Although these organizations strongly

support reduction in transfat from industrial hydrogenation of oils, the extent to which

dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs) increase CVD risk has become a controversial

issue. Recent meta-analyses performed by De Sauza and colleagues,

28

and included



72 studies involving more than 600,000 participants from 18 countries, found no asso-

ciations between dietary SFAs and all-cause mortality, CVD mortality, ischemic

stroke, or T2D. Interestingly, O’Sullivan and colleagues

29

observed that food high in



SFAs, including whole milk, cheese, butter, and other dairy products, were not asso-

ciated with increased risk of mortality.

Increased consumption of fatty fish and long-chain omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty

acids (PUFA) from vegetable oils (eg, canola, corn) and walnut were found to be pro-

tective against CVD mortality in patients with T2D. They improve lipid profile and

modify platelet aggregation despite their lack of effect on glycemic control.

30

It was


also found that supplementation of omega 3 PUFA does not offer any additional car-

diovascular protection.

31

Dietary protein



Dietary protein is important in nutrition management of diabetes. The current recom-

mendations do not support protein restriction for adults with T2D.

12,16,17

Patients with

diabetes, especially when they are poorly controlled, lose significant amount of their

lean muscle mass as they age, and they lose it at a faster pace than individuals without

diabetes.

32,33


Restricting protein intake, especially with lack of strength exercise,

speeds lean muscle loss and may lead to profound sarcopenia.

34,35

Currently, several



organizations do not recommend significant protein restriction below the recommen-

ded dietary allowance of 0.8 g/kg per day for patients with diabetic kidney disease

who are not on dialysis.

12,16,17,36,37

In the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study, assignment to a low-

protein diet of approximately 0.6 g/kg per day compared with the average protein

diet of approximately 1.3 g/kg per day in patients with advanced kidney disease did

not prevent the progressive decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) over 3 years.

38

Early findings from a meta-analysis of randomized clinical studies also did not show



any beneficial renal effects from protein restriction in patients with diabetic nephropa-

thy.


39

However, this is contradicted by another recent meta-analysis by Nezu and col-

leagues.

40

In the latter study, which has several limitations that may affect its quality, the



effectiveness of a low-protein diet was mostly dependent on dietary adherence.

40

For patients on a hypocaloric weight reduction diet, increasing absolute protein



intake is important. Using fixed percentage (eg, 15%–20%) to estimate protein

requirement in a hypocaloric diet may cause inadequate protein intake and put pa-

tients at risk of protein malnutrition and significant lean muscle mass loss during

weight reduction. Joslin guidelines advocate a daily protein intake of not less than

1.2 g/kg of adjusted body weight, which is approximately equivalent to 20% to 30%

Hamdy & Barakatun-Nisak

804



of total daily calories.

16

A higher protein intake reduces hunger, improves satiety, and



minimizes lean muscle mass loss during weight reduction.

41

Micronutrient recommendations



There is no specific vitamin and mineral supplemen-

tation to recommend for patients with diabetes except for those with suspected defi-

ciencies.

1

However, nutrient adequacy is important and should be achieved through a



balance of high-quality dietary intake because poor glycemic control is usually asso-

ciated with micronutrient deficiencies.

42

There are specific patients with diabetes who



require additional supplementation, including those on calorie-restricted diets, elderly

individuals, vegetarians, and pregnant and lactating women.

1

Low serum vitamin D, measured as serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D, is common among



the US population,

43

including patients with diabetes.



44,45

Vitamin D may modify

diabetes risk through its effect on glucose homeostasis.

46

Longitudinal studies have



universally shown an inverse association of vitamin D status with diabetes risk

44

and A1C level.



47

Low serum vitamin D concentration was shown to be associated

with increased risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications in patients

with T2D.

45

However, recent systematic review and meta-analyses that included 35



clinical trials reported that vitamin D

3

supplementation did not show any beneficial



effect on glycemic outcomes or insulin sensitivity in the short term.

48

Longer clinical



trials are lacking.

Patients who selected to have gastric bypass surgery for weight reduction are

particularly at higher risk for vitamin and mineral deficiencies postsurgery.

49

Even



before surgery, some patients were found to be depleted in iron, ferritin, and folic

acid, to have anemia, and to have a high level of parathyroid hormone, indicating a

low level of vitamin D.

50,51


Therefore, it is important to routinely screen patients before

and after bariatric surgery for potential micronutrient deficiencies and supplement

them with iron, vitamin B12, folic acid, and vitamin D in addition to adequate protein

intake.


Diabetes-specific nutrition formula

Diabetes-specific nutrition formula (DSNF) is

usually used as part of MNT to facilitate initial weight reduction while improving glyce-

mic control.

52,53

DSNFs provide approximately 190 to 350 calories per serving. They



have balanced macronutrient composition, including fiber, and they are frequently

fortified with vitamins and minerals. As these products are specifically designed for

patients with diabetes, they contain low GI/GL carbohydrates, higher whey protein

than casein, and contain unique blends of amino acids.

54–56

This combination has



been consistently shown to improve postprandial plasma glucose and insulin

response than standard formulas. In a meta-analysis by Elia and colleagues,

52

DSNF lowered postprandial plasma glucose by 18.5 mg/dL, reduced peak glucose



excursion by 28.6 mg/dL, and reduced insulin requirement by 26% to 71% compared

with standard formulas. Attenuating postprandial plasma glucose excursion is always

a major clinical challenge and was found to contribute to cardiovascular complication

in patients with diabetes.

57

DSNF also improves glucagonlike peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. In response to food,



patients with T2D frequently have lower GLP-1 response than healthy individuals.

58

GLP-1 hormone plays an important role in glucose homeostasis through stimulating



insulin secretion, suppressing glucagon production, delaying gastric emptying, and

enhancing satiety.

59

Using DSNFs for tube feeding in hospitalized patients with diabetes was found to



improve metabolic parameters, to reduce hospital length of stay, and to decrease

the overall hospital cost in comparison with standard formulas.

60,61

As DSNFs are



Nutrition in Diabetes

805



also fortified with vitamins and several micronutrients, their use for malnourished pa-

tients with T2D, especially for elderly patients, was found to improve overall nutritional

status and optimize diabetes control.

61,62


Dietary pattern

Dietary pattern is an overall combination of beneficial foods that are

habitually consumed, which together produce synergistic health effects.

26

Healthy



dietary patterns are commonly rich in fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, fish, dairy

products, and vegetable oils and low in red meat, processed red meat, refined grains,

salt, and added sugar (

Table 2


).

9,10


This pattern is usually high in fiber, vitamins, an-

tioxidants, minerals, polyphenols, and unsaturated fatty acids and is lower in GI/GL,

sodium, and transfat.

15,63


Ajala and colleagues

64

examined 20 RCTs that investigated the effect of different



dietary patterns on glycemic control, lipid profile, and body weight in patients with

T2D for 6 months or more. Six dietary patterns were included in this analysis: low

carbohydrates, low GI, high fiber, high protein, vegetarian/vegan, and Mediterranean

dietary patterns in comparison with the commonly used diabetes nutrition guide-

lines.

65

Low carbohydrates, low-GI, high-protein, and Mediterranean dietary patterns



were found to be the most effective in diabetes management. The ultimate benefit on

glycemic control was achieved with the Mediterranean dietary pattern (

Fig. 2

). These


observations were also seen in 2 recent meta-analyses in which the Mediterranean di-

etary pattern reduced A1C by 0.30% to 0.47%.

66,67

The Mediterranean dietary pattern



also has beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors.

64,67,68


In the PREDIMED trial,

the subgroup of participants with T2D who followed a Mediterranean diet, even

without caloric restriction, had a lower incidence of CVD after a median duration of

4.8 years when compared with those who followed a low-fat diet.

69

The combination



of nutrient-rich foods in the Mediterranean diet might collectively induce favorable

changes in cardio-metabolic risk factors, improve insulin sensitivity, and reduce

oxidation and inflammation.

70

Such CVD benefits were not seen in the Women’s



Health Initiative study among participants who followed a low-fat diet,

71

which further



supports the emerging role of dietary patterns in the primary prevention of CVD in pa-

tients with T2D.

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) may be an ideal cardio-

protective dietary pattern for patients with T2D.

72

Although the benefits of the DASH



diet have been documented for hypertension management and for CVD risk reduction,

little research was done in patients with T2D. In an 8-week small RCT of 44 partici-

pants withT2D, the DASH diet significantly improved glycemic control and cardio-

metabolic parameters, and reduced inflammation markers.

73

Dietary quality also



improved in those who followed the DASH diet in comparison with the control group.

Their consumption of some minerals (calcium and potassium), fiber, fruits, vegetables,

dairy, and whole grains were significantly increased.

73

Vegetarian or vegan diets have also been tested in patients with diabetes. A recent



meta-analysis of controlled clinical studied in patients with T2D for 4 weeks or more

(n

5 225) found a significant reduction in A1C by an average of 0.39%, but with no ef-



fect on fasting plasma glucose.

74

However, this beneficial effect is difficult to separate



from the effect of weight loss, as many of these trials used calorie restriction, reduced

dietary fat, or changed diabetes medications.

74–76

SPECIFIC NUTRITION PLANS FOR PATIENTS WITH DIABETES



Nutrition Strategies for Weight Reduction in Type 2 Diabetes


Yüklə 0,75 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə