O r I g I n a L a r t I c L e



Yüklə 225,04 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/3
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü225,04 Kb.
1   2   3

(a)

(b)

(c)

Figure 2 The percentages of species in Australia that are not

threatened (all), endangered or extinct for (a) habit, (b) sex system

and (c) fruit type. Percentages add to 100 for each extinction risk.

0

10

20



30

40

50



Herb

Vine


Liane

Shr


ub

Tree


Intro

Native


0

20

40



60

80

100



Short-lived

Long-lived

0

20

40



60

80

100



Bise

xual


Dioecious

Monoecious

0

20

40



60

80

Dry-indeh



Dry-deh

Fleshy


% of species 

% of species 

% of species 

% of species 



(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

Figure 1 The percentages of species in Australia that are native or

introduced for (a) habit, (b) life span, (c) sex system and (d) fruit

type. Percentages add to 100 for total species.

Life-history characters in the Australian flora

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290

283

ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd



flora. In each of three trees (Asterids 550–577 genera; Core

Eudicots 454–529 genera; Commelinids 534 genera), character

mapping showed that the non-threatened status is the ancestral

condition and that the conditions of endangered or extinct are

derived characters. The analysis of character-state change in

the three trees, compared with the randomized trees, showed

that, for each tree, threat status (i.e., endangered or extinct)

was significantly non-randomly clustered (Table 4); in other

words, threat status occurs in some genera more often than

expected by chance. To explore this further a concentrated

changes test was used to look at the randomness of

co-occurrence of traits (correlated evolution) such as threat

status and genus size and threat status and sex system.

Correlated evolution was found in the three trees and within

them in several clades (Table 5). Threat status was significantly

phylogenetically concentrated with genus size in some of the

resolved polytomies but not conclusively so (Table 5). Threat

status was significantly phylogenetically concentrated with

unisexual sex systems (monoecy plus dioecy) in the Asteraceae,

Thymelaeaceae, and within a clade comprising the Cyperaceae,

Eriocaulaceae and Hydatellaceae.

D I S C U S S I O N

Australia is renowned for its unusual flora (e.g. Banksia,

Grevillea, Eucalyptus), but less is known about whether this

unusual biodiversity is concomitant with unusual life-history

strategies. The evaluation of the life-history characters in the

Australian flora shows that there are some interesting patterns.

For example, monoecy is the predominant unisexual system

(Table 6) – unlike the general trends found on islands (e.g. New

Zealand and Hawaii, Table 6) and in worldwide assessments

(Table 6). Renner & Ricklefs (1995) point out that non-random

distributions of sex systems in floras may reflect phylogenetic

influences rather than local selective factors. We found support

for this, as the floras of South Africa and India, which have many

botanical affinities with Australia, also have higher levels of

0

10



20

30

40



50

60

70



80

Ex

Herb



Vine

Liane


Shrub

Tree


Herb

Vine


Liane

Shrub


Tree

En All Ex En All Ex En All Ex En All Ex En All

Ex En All Ex En All Ex En All Ex En All Ex En All

Bisexual


Monoecious

Dioecious

0

10

20



30

40

50



60

70

80



Fleshy

Dry-indeh

Dry-deh

(b)

(a)

% of species 

% of species 

Figure 3 The percentages of species in Australia that are not

threatened (all), endangered or extinct for habit with different (a)

sex systems and (b) fruit types. Percentages add to 100 for each

extinction risk.

Table 2 Minimum adequate model describing the probability of

occurrence of character traits in endangered species. The intercept

refers to the baseline category of species with a shrub habit, flowers

bisexual and fruit dry-dehiscent. Sign, coefficient and significance

of the effects are all relative to levels included in the intercept

Step

Coefficient



estimate

SD

Wald



P

(Intercept)

)3.33

0.09


36.906

< 0.001***

Herbs


0.26

0.12


2.112

0.035*


Trees

)0.27


0.20

)1.347


0.178

Monoecious

)1.15

0.31


)3.680

0.002***


Dioecious

)0.18


0.37

)0.484


0.628

Fleshy


)0.65

0.26


)2.482

0.013*


Dry-indehiscent

)0.16


0.18

)0.914


0.361

Herbs : monoecious

0.58

0.47


1.235

0.217


Trees : monoecious

1.43


0.41

3.514


< 0.001***

Herbs : dioecious

)0.48

0.63


)0.761

0.447


Trees : dioecious

)0.65


0.71

)0.916


0.360

Herbs : fleshy

)0.77

0.76


)1.008

0.313


Trees : fleshy

0.44


0.39

1.140


0.254

Herbs : dry-indehiscent

)1.38

0.30


)4.681

< 0.001***

Trees : dry-indehiscent

0.02

0.63


0.031

0.976


Deviance explained (%)

84

Values are in the transformed (logit) scale.



Table 3 The analysis of deviance table for the minimum adequate

model for endangered species

Term

d.f.


Deviance

Residual


d.f.

Residual


deviance

P

(> |v|)



Null

41

143.036





Habit

2

0.383



39

142.653


0.826

Sex


2

26.874


37

115.779


< 0.001

Fruit


2

48.444


35

67.336


< 0.001

Habitat : sex

4

16.667


31

50.669


0.002

Habitat : fruit

4

27.354


27

23.315


< 0.001

A. Sjo¨stro¨m and C. L. Gross

284

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290



ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

monoecy than of dioecy (Table 6). Gross (2005) identified high

levels of monoecy in the tree flora of tropical Australia and

hypothesized that inefficient insect pollination systems may be

instrumental in maintaining monoecy.

Hegde & Ellstrand (1999) point out that generalizations

about rare and endangered species are important for the

development

of conservation

management

policy,


and

moreover for understanding the nature of rarity. Our results,

the first to incorporate all of the Australian flowering plants are

complex – they show that the condition of endangered and

extinction in Australian flowering species can be associated

with a combination of life-history characters that can be

correlated with phylogeny. We explore here the evolutionary

and ecological significance of these findings; we are left with

more questions than answers but hope that we generate

interest to test our hypotheses.

The association of habit with extinction

Trees are absent from the Australian extinct list. Recently

presumed extinct taxa in some locations outside Australia also

show patterns among their life-history strategies. For example, a

bias in the habit of species that have become extinct is evident in

an isolated fragment of lowland rainforest in the Singapore

Botanic Gardens (Turner et al., 1996). In over a century of

isolation, proportionately fewer trees than other life forms have

become extinct there. In another study, Robinson et al. (1994)

investigated plant species losses and invasions during a period of

112 years (1879–1991) on Staten Island, New York. They found

that trees exhibit higher levels of persistence than shrubs or vines,

and woody plants in general appear to be less vulnerable to

extirpation than herbaceous ones. From Robinson et al. (1994)

and Turner et al. (1996), it appears that trees tend to persist in a

variety of locations around the world, and in the face of possibly

quite different threatening processes. This tendency, however,

must be interpreted within the context of the relative longevity of

Table 4 Results of the test for trait clustering (rare or not), where

the observed number of steps of character-state change (trait

gains) in each tree was compared with the random distribution of

characters from 1000 tree resolutions

Trait

examined


Observed

number


of steps

Range of


steps

in 1000


randomizations

Rank of


observed

relative to

randomized

Rarity – Asterid clade

21

46–50


1

Rarity – Core Eudicot clade 19

56–63

1

Rarity – Commelinid clade



16

42–47


1

Figure 4 The proportion of (a) endangered species (odds

ratio

¼ 1.131 with 95% confidence interval 1.099–1.163, t ¼ 4.37,



P < 0.001; G

2

¼ 19.17, d.f. ¼ 1, P < 0.001) or (b) extinct species



(t

¼

)0.18; G



2

¼ 0.61, d.f. ¼ 1, P ¼ 0.43) within a genus versus

log(genus size) for all of the Australian genera (n

¼ 1978), and

the proportion of endangered species or extinct species within a

genus versus log(genus size) for only those genera with (c)

endangered species (odds ratio

¼ 0.619 with 95% confidence

interval 0.596–0.643, t

¼

)7.17; G



2

¼ 169.53, d.f. ¼ 1, P < 0.001)

(n

¼ 179) or (d) extinct species (odds ratio ¼ 0.365 with 95%



confidence interval 0.318–0.420, t

¼

)7.24; G



2

¼

)61.54,



d.f.

¼ 1, P < 0.001) (n ¼ 26). t: Wald statistic. The outside lines

are the 95% confidence intervals for the fitted curve (central line).

Life-history characters in the Australian flora

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290

285


ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Table 5 Examples of correlated evolution in two traits in clades from the angiosperm supertree

Clade


Trait comparison

Number of taxa

P values

Asterids


Rarity and genus size

550


0.00–0.00

Core Eudicots

Rarity and genus size

454


0.00–0.006

Commelinids (monocots)

Rarity and genus size

534


0.00–0.147

Asterales

Rarity and genus size

168


0.00–0.514

Apiales


Rarity and genus size

44

0.00–0.551



Solanales

Rarity and genus size

13

0.00–1.00



Lamiales

Rarity and genus size

127

0.00–0.359



Asteraceae

Rarity and genus size

140

0.00–0.508



Apiaceae

Rarity and genus size

27

0.125–0.154



Asterids

Rarity and sex system

577

0.00–0.00



Core Eudicots

Rarity and sex system

529

0.00–0.00



Commelinids (monocots)

Rarity and sex system

534

0.00–0.00



Asterales

Rarity and sex system

162

0.001–0.006



Solanales

Rarity and sex system

14

0.63–0.09



Asteraceae

Rarity and sex system

145

0.001–0.010



Apiaceae

Rarity and sex system

27

0.125–0.191



Thymelaeaceae

Rarity and sex system

10

0.00–0.00



Sapindaceae

Rarity and sex system

45

0.486–0.672



Sapindaceae

Rarity and sex system (bisexual or not)

45

0.00–0.563



Euphorbiaceae

Rarity and sex system

45

Unisexual or not



0.574–0.672

Bisexual or not

0.486–0.671

Cyperaceae, Eriocaulaceae and Hydatellaceae

Rarity and sex system (unisexual or not)

50

0.00–0.02



Asterids

Rarity and fruit type

564

Fleshy or not



0.00–0.00

Dry-indehiscent or not

0.00–0.00

Dry-dehiscent or not

0.00–0.00

Core Eudicots

Rarity and fruit type

467


Fleshy or not

0.00–0.00

Dry-indehiscent or not

0.00–0.00

Dry-dehiscent or not

>0.05


Commelinids (monocots)

Rarity and fruit type

534

Fleshy or not



0.00–0.00

Dry-indehiscent or not

0.00–0.00

Dry-dehiscent or not

0.00–0.00

Liliaceae

Rarity and fruit type (fleshy or not)

35

0.062–0.084



Zingiberaceae

Rarity and fruit type (fleshy or not)

9

0.559–0.704



Triuridaceae, Stemonaceae and Pandanaceae

Rarity and fruit type (fleshy or not)

4

0.00–0.00



Cyperaceae, Eriocaulaceae and Hydatellaceae

Rarity and fruit type

44

Dry-indehiscent or not



0.98–0.993

Dry-dehiscent or not

0.007–0.014

Asterids


Rarity and fruit type

564


Fleshy or not

0.00–0.00

Dry-indehiscent or not

0.00–0.00

Dry-dehiscent or not

0.00–0.00

Apocynaceae

Rarity and fruit type (fleshy or not)

31

0.007–0.025



Goodeniaceae

Rarity and fruit type (dry-dehiscent or not)

13

0.045–0.087



Euphorbiaceae

Rarity and fruit type (fleshy or not)

44

0.00–0.00



Myrtaceae

Rarity and fruit type

76

Fleshy or not



0.00–0.00

Dry-indehiscent or not

0.00–0.001

Rutaceae


Rarity and fruit type (fleshy or not)

44

0.00–0.00



Sapindaceae

Rarity and fruit type (dry-indehiscent or not)

31

0.013–0.020



P values are based on 10 random trees with resolved polytomies. No other clades gave significant P values.

A. Sjo¨stro¨m and C. L. Gross

286

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290



ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Table

6

The



distribution

of

life-history



characters

(%)


in

20

studies



Study

Bio.


region

Number


of

species


Habit

Life


span

Sex


Fruit

Woody


N

on-wdy


Sht

L

ng



Mix

H

erm



Dio

Mono


M

ix

Flshy



Dry

Tr

Sh



Li

He

Vi



Dry-indeh

Dry-deh


This

study


A

ustralia


16,824

(total),


16,704

(habit),


16,702

(lfspan),

16,655

(sex),


16,802

(fruit)


17.3

40.8


2.1

38.5


1.2

10.1


89.9

76.3


5.5

18.1


13.0

28.0


59.0

Parsons


(1958)

S.

Australia



2102

89.0


4.2

5.9


1.0

McComb


(1966)

W.

Australia



3886

90.0


4.4

2.5


3.0

Godley


(1979)

New


Z

ealand


1813

76.0


15.0

9.0


Rogers

&

W



alker

(2002)


New

Z

ealand



2715

23.6


2.1

65.6


Steiner

(1988)


South

Africa


565

(habit,


fruit),

8497


(sex)

37.3


62.7

79.7


6.7

13.0


68.3

31.5


Flores

&

Schemske



(1984)

Caribbean

2036

(fruit),


2037

(habit,


sex)

22.7


15.7

10.7


50.9

78.9


6.2

14.9


35.3

64.7


McComb

(1966)


British

Isles


1594

80.7


3.1*

8.7


7.5

Hegde


and

Ellstrand

 

(1999)


British

Isles


860

12.4


87.6

30.9


69.1

6.2


4

4.8


49.1

Khedr


et

al.


(2002)

à

Egypt



2340

(habit),


2376

(lfspan)


1.4

18.5


0.8

79.3


47.8

47.4


4.8

Fox


(1985)

Alaska


1471

8.7


91.3

4.3


9

5.7


Fox

(1985)


California

5421


14.2

85.8


6.6

9

3.4



Hegde

&

Ellstrand



(1999)

California

718

17.7


82.3

35.1


64.9

1.9


4

2.8


55.4

Conn


et

al.


(1980)

N

+



S

C

arolina



3274§

5.3


8.6

83.0


3.1

20.6


79.4

Kaye


et

al.


(1997)

Oregon


338

0.3



7.1

92.6


16.9

83.1


Carlquist

(1966)


Hawaii

1484


55.4

30.7


13.9

Sakai


et

al.


(1995)

Hawaii


844

(habit),


966

(fruit)


28.9

40.8


30.1

44.1


55.9

Sakai


et

al.


(2002)

Hawaii**


1159

(habit),


1045

(lfspan),

1040

(sex)


25.5

42.4


1.5

25.4


4.9

2.1


97.9

62.9


21.0

16.1


42.4

57.7


Robinson

et

al.



(1994)

Statten


Island-current

639


2.7

5.0


59.3

10.3


56.7

17.1


dng

dng


Robinson

et

al.



(1994)

Statten


Island-historic

1082


8.7

8.9


79.8

15.5


81.8

26.5


dng

dng


Turner

et

al.



(1996)

Singapore-current

314

38.5


8.9

20.1


3.8

Turner


et

al.


(1996)

Singapore-historic

448

63.8


8.5

23.2


3.1

Roy


(1974)

India


13,988

79.4


6.7

13.7


Yampolsky

&

Yampolsky



(1922)

World


121,492

71.4


3.5

14.0


10.5

Tr:


tree,

Sh:


shrub,

Li:


liane,

He:


herb,

Vi:


vine,

Non-wdy:


non-woody;

lfspan:


life

span,


Sht:

short


duration,

Lng:


long

duration;

Herm:

hermaphrodi



te,

Dio:


dioecious,

Mono:


monoecious;

Flshy:


fleshy

fruits,


Dry-indeh:

dry-indehiscent

fruits,

Dry-deh:


dry-dehiscent

fruits;


dng:

data


not

given.


*Kay

&

Stevens



(1986)

report


dioecy

levels


of

4%

(n



¼

59).


 

Data


also

from


S.

Hegde,


pers.

comm.


à

Includes


introduced

species;


parasites

(n

¼



36)

omitted


from

habit.


§Includes

gymnosperms

and

introduced



species.

Threatened



species

only.


**Endangered

species


only.

Life


span

and


sex

are


endangered

endemics


only.

Life-history characters in the Australian flora

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290

287


ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə