O r I g I n a L a r t I c L e



Yüklə 225,04 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/3
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü225,04 Kb.
1   2   3

Australian angiosperm flora looks like, for example it is

predominantly composed of bisexual shrubs with dry-dehis-

cent fruits (Fig. 1), and, not unexpectedly, this combination of

characters is significantly and negatively associated with a

threatened status (Table 2). The binomial and the multinomial

models reveal that the occurrence of a threatened status in the

Australian flora can be explained by a complex interaction

between habit, sex system and fruit type. Thus it may be

misleading to use a single character state or layer of informa-

tion to infer character association with a threatened status. If

interaction is considered, it appears from the binomial model

(Table 2) that there is a significant and positive association of

endangered trees having a monoecious sex system. In contrast,

there is a significant occurrence of herbs with dry-indehiscent

fruits not being endangered species. From this we hypothesize

that tree species with monoecious sex systems (rare and

common) are likely to be vulnerable to processes that increase

extinction risk, such as fragmentation. Gross (2005) postulates

that the high predominance of monoecy in Australian

rainforest trees may be related to inefficiencies in insect

pollination systems – and from this we suggest that inefficien-

cies in pollination could be causal of extinction risk. Support

for this hypothesis comes from Sakai et al. (2002), who found

for the Hawaiian flora that insect pollination is significantly

associated with extinction risk. In contrast, we hypothesize that

herbs with dry-indehiscent fruits are resilient to the processes

of fragmentation. These will be interesting areas to test, for

example in rehabilitation studies.

The influence of phylogeny on extinction risk

We found that phylogeny and particular life-history characters

are significantly correlated with extinction risk. For example,

extinction risk and unisexual flowers are significantly correlated

in the Asteraceae, Thymelaeaceae, and in a clade represented by

the Cyperaceae, Eriocaulaceae and Hydatellaceae. Similarly,

certain fruit types are also correlated with a threatened status in

some groups. For example, in the Apocynaceae, Euphorbiaceae,

Myrtaceae and Rutaceae, fleshy fruit and extinction risk are

correlated. Whether the correlation between these characters

and extinction risk is cause or effect remains to be tested. Our

results could, however, be used in conservation planning; for

example, species from the Euphorbiaceae with fleshy fruits on

low-priority threatened species lists could be flagged for

population assessment, a process that otherwise might not

happen for many years if at all, thus enabling species to be caught

in a cost-effective way before they become critically endangered.

The association between speciosity and extinction risk

Studies that determine whether rarity is associated with taxon

speciosity provide the opportunity to test the hypothesis that

rates of rarity are independent of taxonomic group-size (e.g.

Edwards & Westoby, 2000; Schwartz & Simberloff, 2001).

Results from studies between speciosity, extinction risk and

taxon size (e.g. Edwards & Westoby, 2000) should, however, be

viewed with caution if artificial phylogenies (e.g. Cronquist,

1988 classification system) were used in the study. Our results

concur with those of Schwartz & Simberloff (2001); that is,

genera and families with few species consistently contain fewer

than the expected number of threatened species. We did detect

a significant positive relationship between extinction risk and

the size of genera for endangered species and the size of

families for extinct species, but bootstrapping supports our

hypothesis that these relationships are an artifact of the fact

that most genera and families in Australia are small. Thus, as

pointed out by Schwartz & Simberloff (2001), plant conser-

vation is facilitated by the fact that there are relatively few

species-poor lineages that contain rare species.

C O N C L U S I O N

At the continental scale, the Australian flora mostly comprises

bisexual shrubs with dry-dehiscent fruits, and this combina-

tion of characters is significantly and negatively associated with

rarity. Moreover, herbs with dry-indehiscent fruits are unlikely

to be endangered species. This combination of characters could

be taken into consideration for the selection of species with

robust life-history strategies where resilience is greatly needed,

for example in the restoration of degraded habitats. The tree

life form is significantly absent from the contemporary list of

extinct species in Australia. This may reflect a degree of

resilience in the tree life form, as well as too short an

observation period. In particular, there are many trees on the

current endangered list, indicating that extinction is a real

threat for such species. However, the longevity of many tree

species provides a window of opportunity to mitigate some

threats. Our analyses showed that monoecious trees in

particular may be a life form vulnerable to extinction

processes. Our approach has been a broad one, so that

most flowering species in Australia could be assessed for

key life-history strategies. This approach could also be used

as a model for other floras for which a continent-specific

profile of the life-history characters would expedite conserva-

tion planning.

A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S

The following people kindly answered our botanical queries:

L. Adams, K. Atkins, B. Bennett, E. Brown, J.J. Bruhl,

D. Coates, B. Conn, R. Chinnock, D. Dixon, R. Elick, J.

Everett, A.S. George, B. Gray, S.G. Hegde, B.P.M. Hyland, B. R.

Jackes, J. Jeanes, L. Jessup, R.W. Johnson, G. Keighery, A.

Lowrie, D. Mackay, N. Marchant L. Meredith, A. Orchard, P.

A. Sjo¨stro¨m and C. L. Gross

288

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290



ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Weston, P. Wilson. M.M.R. Gross provided translations from

the Latin. The directors from the following herbaria are

thanked for allowing us access to their specimens and/or data

bases: AD, BRI, NE, NSW, QRS, PERTH. Several colleagues

reviewed an earlier version of this manuscript. R. Goldingay, S.

McIntyre, D. Morrison, A. Robertson. D.A. Mackay, R.

Murison and J. Reid are thanked for comments on statistics.

D.A. Mackay, D.A. Keith and B.R. Murray are thanked for

valuable suggestions. D. Bowman and B.W. Brooks are

thanked for comments that improved the manuscript. The

study was funded by the University of New England.

R E F E R E N C E S

Akaike, H. (1974) A new look at statistical model identification.

IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, Au-19, 716–722.

Akcakaya, H.R., Ferson, S., Burgman, M.A., Keith, D.A., Mace,

G.M. & Todd, C.R. (2000) Making consistent IUCN classi-

fications under uncertainty. Conservation Biology, 14, 1001–

1013.


Briggs, J.D. & Leigh, J.H. (1996) Rare or threatened Australian

plants, 1995 rev. edn. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research;

Australian Nature Conservation Agency, Canberra, Australia.

Burgman, M.A. (2002) Are listed threatened plant species

actually at risk? Australian Journal of Botany, 50, 1–13.

Carlquist, S. (1966) The biota of long distance dispersal. IV.

Genetic systems in the floras of oceanic islands. Evolution,

20, 433–455.

Chazdon, R.L., Careaga, S., Webb, C. & Vargas, O. (2003)

Community and phylogenetic structure of reproductive

traits of woody species in wet tropical forests. Ecological

Monographs, 73, 331–348.

Conn, J.S., Wentworth, T.R. & Blum, U. (1980) Patterns of

dioecism in the flora of the Carolinas. The American Mid-

land Naturalist, 103, 310–315.

Crawley, M.S. (2003) Statistical computing. An introduction to

data analysis using S-Plus. Wiley, Chichester, UK.

Cronquist, A. (1988) The evolution and classification of

flowering plants, 2nd edn. New York Botanical Garden

Publication, Bronx, NY.

Davies, T.J., Barraclough, T.G., Chase, M.W., Soltis, P.S.,

Soltis, D.E. & Savolainen, V. (2004) Darwin’s abominable

mystery: insights from a supertree of the angiosperms.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United

States of America, 101, 1904–1909.

Edwards, W. & Westoby, M. (2000) Families with highest

proportions of rare species are not consistent between floras.

Journal of Biogeography, 27, 733–740.

Flores, S. & Schemske, D. (1984) Dioecy and monoecy in the

flora of Puerto Rica and the virgin islands. Biotropica, 16,

132–139.

Fox, J.F. (1985) Incidence of dioecy in relation to growth form,

pollination and dispersal. Oecologia, 67, 244–249.

Garcia, M.B. (2003) Demographic viability of a relict popu-

lation of the critically endangered plant Borderea chouardii.

Conservation Biology, 17, 1672–1680.

Godley, E. (1979) Flower biology in New Zealand. New Zea-

land Journal of Botany, 17, 441–466.

Golding, J.S. & Hurter, P.J.H. (2003) A Red List account

of Africa’s cycads and implications of considering life-

history and threats. Biodiversity and Conservation, 12, 507–

528.


Gross, C.L. (2005) A comparison of the sexual systems in the

trees from the Australian tropics with other tropical biomes

– more monoecy but why? American Journal of Botany,

92(6), 907–919.

Hegde, S.G. & Ellstrand, N.C. (1999) Life history differences

between rare and common flowering plant species of Cali-

fornia and the British Isles. International Journal of Plant

Sciences, 160, 1083–1091.

Hnatiuk, R.J. (ed.) (1990) Census of Australian vascular plants.

Australian Govt. Pub. Service, Canberra.

Ihaka, R. & Gentleman, R. (1996) R: A language for data

analysis and graphics. Journal of Computational and Gra-

phical Statistics, 5, 299–314.

Kay, Q.O.N. & Stevens, D.P. (1986) The frequency, distribu-

tion and reproductive biology of dioecious species in the

native flora of Britain and Ireland. Botanical Journal of the

Linnean Society, 92, 39–64.

Kaye, T., Meinke, R.J., Kagan, J., Virlakas, S., Chambers, K.,

Zika, P.F. & Nelson, J. (1997) Patterns of rarity in the

Oregon flora: implications for conservation and manage-

ment. Conservation and management of native plants and

fungi (ed. by T.N. Kaye, A. Liston, R.M. Love, D. Luoma,

R.J. Meinke and M.V. Wilson), pp. 1–10. Native Plant

Society of Oregon, Corvallis, OR.

Keith, D.A. & Burgman, M.A. (2004) The Lazarus effect: can the

dynamics of extinct species lists tell us anything about the

status of biodiversity? Biological Conservation, 117, 41–48.

Khedr, A.H., Cadotte, M.W., El Keblawy, A. & Lovett-Doust, J.

(2002) Phylogenetic diversity and ecological features in

the Egyptian flora. Biodiversity and Conservation, 11, 1809–

1824.

Laurance, W.F., Lovejoy, T.E., Vasconcelos, H.L., Bruna, E.M.,



Didham, R.K., Stouffer, P.C., Gascon, C., Bierregaard, R.O.,

Laurance, S.G. & Sampaio, E. (2002) Ecosystem decay of

Amazonian forest fragments: a 22-year investigation. Con-

servation Biology, 16, 605–618.

Maddison, D.R. & Maddison, W.P. (2001) MacClade 4.03.

Sinauer Associates, Inc., Sunderland, MA.

McComb, J.A. (1966) The sex forms of species in the flora of

south-west Western Australia. Australian Journal of Botany,

14, 303–316.

Morley, B.D. & Toelken, H.R. (eds) (1983) Flowering plants in

Australia. Rigby Publishers, Adelaide.

Murray, B.R. & Lepschi B.J. (2004) Are locally rare species

abundant elsewhere in their geographical range? Austral

Ecology, 29, 287–293.

Murray, B.R., Thrall, P.H., Gill, A.M. & Nicotra, A.B. (2002a)

How plant life-history and ecological traits relate to species

rarity and commonness at varying spatial scales. Austral

Ecology, 27, 291–310.

Life-history characters in the Australian flora

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290

289

ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd



Murray, B.R., Thrall, P.H. & Lepschi, B.J. (2002b) Relating

species rarity to life history in plants of eastern Australia.

Evolutionary Ecology Research, 4, 937–950.

Parsons, P.A. (1958) Evolution of sex in the flowering plants of

South Australia. Nature, 181, 1673–1674.

Possingham, H.P., Andelman, S.J., Burgman, M.A., Medellin,

R.A., Master, L.L. & Keith, D.A. (2002) Limits to the use of

threatened species lists. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 17,

503–507.

Rabinowitz, D. (1981) Seven forms of rarity. The biological

aspects of rare plant conservation (ed. by H. Synge), pp. 205–

217. Wiley, New York.

Renner, S.S. & Ricklefs, RE. (1995) Dioecy and its correlates in

the flowering plants. American Journal of Botany, 82, 596–

606.

Rey Benayas, J.M., Scheiner, S.M., Sanchez-Colomer, M.G. &



Levassor, C. (1999) Commonness and rarity: theory and

application of a new model to Mediterranean montane

grasslands. Conservation Ecology, 3, 5. http://www.consecol.

org/vol3/iss1/art5.

Robinson, G.R., Yurlina, M.E. & Handel, S.N. (1994) A cen-

tury of change in the Staten Island flora: ecological correlates

of species losses and invasions. Bulletin of the Torrey Bota-

nical Club, 121, 119–129.

Rogers, G. & Walker, S. (2002) Taxonomic and ecological

profiles of rarity in the New Zealand vascular flora. New

Zealand Journal of Botany, 40, 73–93.

Roy, R.P. (1974) Sex mechanism in higher plants. The Journal

of the Indian Botanical Society, 53, 141–155.

Sakai, A.K., Wagner, W.L., Ferguson, D.M. & Herbst, D.

(1995) Biogeographical and ecological correlates of dioecy in

the Hawaiian flora. Ecology, 76, 2530–2543.

Sakai, A.K., Wagner, W.L. & Mehrhoff, L.A. (2002) Patterns of

endangerment in the Hawaiian flora. Systematic Biology, 51,

276–302.

Schwartz, M.W. & Simberloff, D. (2001) Taxon size predicts

rates of rarity in vascular plants. Ecology Letters, 4, 464–469.

Scott, B. & Gross, C.L. (2004) Recovery directions for mono-

ecious and endangered Bertya ingramii using autecology and

comparisons

with

common


B.

rosmarinifolia

(Euphorbiaceae). Biodiversity and Conservation, 13, 885–899.

Steiner, K.E. (1988) Dioecism and its correlates in the cape flora

of South Africa. American Journal of Botany, 75, 1742–1754.

Stevens, P.F. (2001) Angiosperm phylogeny website. Version 5,

May 2004 (and updated more or less continuously since).

http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/research/APweb/.

Turner, I.M., Chua, K.S., Ong, Y.S.Y., Soong, B.D. & Tan,

H.T.W. (1996) A century of plant species loss from an

isolated fragment of lowland tropical rain forest. Conserva-

tion Biology, 10, 1229–1244.

Vamosi, J.C. & Vamosi, S.M. (2005) Present day risk of ex-

tinction may exacerbate the lower species richness of dioe-

cious clades. Diversity and Distributions, 11, 25–32.

Venables, W.N. & Ripley, B.D. (2002) Modern applied statistics

with S, 4th edn. Springer, New York.

Walter, K.S. & Gillett, H.J. (eds) (1998) 1997 IUCN Red list of

threatened plants, compiled by the World Conservation

Monitoring Centre. IUCN – The World Conservation Union,

Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.

Webb, C.O. & Donoghue, M.J. (2002) Phylomatic: a database

for applied phylogenetics. http://www.phylodiversity.net/

phylomatic.

Yampolsky, C. & Yampolsky, H. (1922) Distribution of sex

forms in the Phanerogamic flora. Bibliotheca Genetica, 3, 1–63.

B I O S K E T C H E S

Anne Sjo¨stro¨m is interested in the life histories of threatened

Australian flora and the detection of patterns that can be

applied to conservation management.

Caroline Gross studies the distribution of life-history

characters in relation to phylogeny. She has broad interests

in the ecology of pioneer species and plant species in decline,

particularly their reproductive ecologies. The evolutionary

ecology of plant sexual systems, particularly in tropical

ecosystems is a current research focus.

Editor: David Bowman

A. Sjo¨stro¨m and C. L. Gross



290

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290



ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd


Yüklə 225,04 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə