Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 26,37 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə34/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü26,37 Mb.
1   ...   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   ...   41

A4
Fi
gu
re
:
Pr
oj
ec
t I
D:
 1
12
6
Dr
aw
n:
 D
C
Da
te
: 0
8/
07
/1
0
K
0
20
40
Ki
lo
m
et
re
s
1:
2,
12
6,
24
9
Ab
so
lu
te
 S
ca
le
 - 
U
ni
qu

M
ap
 ID
: M
X
XX
Cl
ie
nt
 L
og
o(
s)
Lo
ca
tio

of
 S
le
nd
er
-b
ill
ed
Th
or
nb
ill
s
Figure 8-2  Slender-billed Thornbill records

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
233
8.2.2 
Nature and extent of likely impact 
8.2.2.1 
Slender‐billed Thornbill 
The  Slender‐billed  Thornbill  (Acanthiza  iredalei  iredalei)  is  a  small  bird  that  occurs  in  the  arid  and 
semi‐arid zones of southern WA and South Australia (SA).  Its known distribution extends from near 
Carnarvon in WA, east through central WA, and across the Nullarbor Plain to Whyalla, Port Augusta 
and Port Davis in SA.   Slender‐billed  Thornbills are  uncommon, rare or extinct across most of their 
range,  with  the  exception  of  populations  on  the  Mid‐West  coast,  where  they  are  considered 
moderately common (Ecologia, 2010b).  They are found mainly in chenopod shrublands, in treeless 
or sparsely wooded flatlands, and samphire and low melaleuca shrubs.  Based on the habitat present 
in  the  Proposal  Area,  it  is  possible  that  the  Slender‐billed  Thornbill  occurs  in  the  Proposal  Area,  as 
patches of salt flats with chenopod shrubland occur within the Proposal Area (Ecologia, 2010b).  
Slender‐billed Thornbills were not recorded during recent Ecologia surveys.  Approximately 14 hours 
of  bird  surveys  were  conducted  in  areas  of  halophytic  vegetation  suitable  for  Slender‐billed 
Thornbills,  and  transects  for  the  species  were  conducted  where  potentially  suitable  habitat  was 
encountered. 
This  species  has  previously  been  recorded  in  the  Study  Area  near  Weld  Range,  in  the  chenopod 
shrubland to the north of the Weld Range Gap (Figure 8‐2).   
Within the Study Area small patches of potential habitat may occur in Sections OPR‐B, OPR‐D, OPR‐E 
and  OPR‐F  of  the  Study  Area,  as  well  as  the  salt  lake  and  floodplain  vegetation  of  the  Murchison 
Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation of Australia (IBRA) region (Mf1, Mf2, & Mf3, covering a total of 
1117 ha), as these contain chenopod vegetation.   
Figure 5‐17 shows these vegetation units and Appendix 7 shows the indicative alignment in relation 
to  these  salt  lake  and  floodplain  vegetation  types.    Predicted  clearing  based  on  an  indicative  rail 
alignment (Table 7‐9) estimates Mf1, Mf2 and Mf3 will have 14 ha (2.6%), 1 ha (5%), and 17 ha (3%) 
impacted  respectively,  equating  to  a  total  of  32  ha  (2.9%)  being  potentially  impacted.    This 
calculation  is  based  on  an  assessment  of  the  habitat  types  only  within  the  Study  Area,  as  detailed 
vegetation mapping has not been conducted outside of the Study Area.  It is therefore probable that 
there will be additional habitat outside of the Study Area. 
Will the action lead to a long‐term decrease in the size of an important population of a species? 
While the species has previously been recorded in the Proposal Area, it was not observed in the most 
recent  survey  by  Ecologia.    In  addition,  the  preferred  habitat  for  the  species  is  limited  within  the 
Proposal  Area  to  the  region  north  of  Weld  Range  and  only  small  patches  elsewhere  along  the  Rail 
Corridor.  As the habitat is unlikely to support large numbers of this species, it is considered unlikely 
that the rail development will decrease the size of an important population of this species. 
Will the action reduce the area of occupancy of an important population? 
The area of suitable habitat within the Proposal Area is limited to chenopod shrubland north of Weld 
Range  and  small  patches  in  OPR‐B,  OPR‐D,  OPR‐E  and  OPR‐F  sections  of  the  Proposal  Area  (Figure 
5‐23).  It is therefore unlikely to support large numbers of the species.  The Proposal development is 
unlikely to reduce the area of occupancy of an important population. 
Will the action fragment an existing important population into two or more populations? 
The  Proposal  Area  is  unlikely  to  support  large  numbers  of  the  Slender‐billed  Thornbill  due  to  the 
limited  fraction  of  suitable  habitat  within  its  boundaries.    Nevertheless,  the  impact  area  is  narrow 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
234
and will not constrain movement of this species.  As a result, the Proposal is unlikely to fragment an 
important population of this species.   
Will the action adversely affect habitat critical to the survival of the species? 
The  Proposal  is  unlikely  to  affect  habitat  critical  to  the  survival  of  the  species  as  limited  suitable 
habitat exists within the Proposal Area.  Suitable habitat is limited to patches of chenopod shrubland 
north of Weld Range and  in OPR‐B, OPR‐D, OPR‐E and OPR‐F sections of the  Proposal Area (Figure 
5‐23) and are not likely to support significant populations of this species. 
Will the action disrupt the breeding cycle of an important population? 
It is unlikely that the Slender‐billed Thornbill breeds along the majority of the Proposal Area due to 
limited suitable habitat.  Chenopod shrubland in treeless or sparsely wooded flatlands and samphire 
and  low  melaleuca  shrubs  are  the  preferred  habitat  for  this  species.    Suitable  habitat  as  described 
occurs north of the Weld Range and in small patches in the OPR‐B, OPR‐D, OPR‐E and OPR‐F sections 
of  the  Rail  Corridor.  While  it  is  possible  that  the  species  occurs  in  the  area,  it  is  unlikely  that  large 
numbers occur along the Proposal Area.   
Will the action modify, destroy, remove or isolate or decrease the availability or quality of habitat 
to the extent that the species is likely to decline? 
It  is  unlikely  that  the  proposed  action  will  modify,  destroy,  remove  or  isolate  or  decrease  the 
availability or quality of habitat to the extent that the species is likely to decline.  The Proposal Area is 
unlikely to support large numbers of Slender‐billed Thornbill due to the limited availability of suitable 
habitat within the corridor.  In addition, the patches of potential habitat that exist are in most parts 
towards the boundary of the Proposal rather than in the centreline.  It is likely that most patches of 
chenopod shrubland that may serve as habitat will be avoided. 
Will  the  action  result  in  invasive  species  that  are  harmful  to  a  vulnerable  species  becoming 
established in the vulnerable species’ habitat? 
The main potential threat to the Slender‐billed Thornbill is habitat degradation, caused by livestock 
and  rabbits,  which  graze  intensively  on  the  chenopod  shrublands  that  are  the  preferred  habitat  of 
the species. The historical decline in the distribution and numbers of the Slender‐billed Thornbill has 
been  mainly  attributed  to  the  impact  of  grazing.    There  is  evidence  that  rabbit  control  may  be  an 
effective measure in protecting habitat for this species (DEWHA 2010a).  The Proposal is unlikely to 
result in an increase in rabbit numbers that in turn may lead to habitat degradation.   
Will the action introduce disease that may cause the species to decline? 
The proposed action is  unlikely to introduce disease that may cause the Slender‐billed Thornbill to 
decline.  The dominant threats to the species are degradation of chenopod shrubland by rabbits and 
livestock which is the preferred habitat.  Disease is not considered a threat to the species. 
Will the action interfere substantially with the recovery of the species? 
The action is unlikely to interfere substantially with the recovery of the Slender‐billed Thornbill as the 
area is unlikely to support large numbers of the species.  In addition, there is limited potential habitat 
within  the  Proposal  Area  and  those  patches  that  do  exist  are  likely  to  be  avoided  by  the  rail 
centreline. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
235
8.2.2.2 
Western Spiny‐tailed Skink 
The  Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink  (Egernia  stokesii  badia)  is  confined  to  WA  and  occurs  in  the 
Murchison  region  and  in  the  Wheatbelt,  from  Mullewa  south  to  Kellerberrin.  The  black  or  melanic 
form  of  the  skink  (Plate  8‐1)  shelters  within  crevices  of  large  rocky  outcrops  and  occasionally  in 
hollow  logs  and  semi  arboreal  habitats  (Ecologia,  2010c)  and  has  been  found  within  the  Proposal 
Area.  Unlike the brown form of the species, the black form does not inhabit tree hollows (Ecologia, 
2010c). 
 
Plate 8‐1  Western Spiny‐tailed Skink (Egernia stokesii badia) (Ecologia, 2010c) 
The  Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink  (black  form)  was  formerly  known  from  only  a  handful  of  locations 
including Woolgorong Rock and 4 km east of Yalgoo (Ecologia, 2010c).  In relation to the proposed 
action this species was first recorded during comprehensive baseline fauna surveys undertaken along 
the Proposal Area in 2006. As a result of the discovery of numerous previously unknown populations, 
OPR  commissioned  two  further  targeted  fauna  surveys  for  the  skink  (black  form).    The  first  was 
designed to map the occurrence of the skink (black form) within the Proposal Area, and the second 
was  designed  to  search  for  the  skink  within  geotechnical  feasibility  study  locations  including 
proposed future quarry/borrow areas. 
Threatening  processes  that  are  thought  to  be  the  cause  of  the  decline  of  this  species  have  been 
identified  as  a  combination  of  overgrazing  by  stock  and  clearance  of  woodland  habitat  for 
agriculture, although clearance of woodland habitat is less of a threat to the black form as they use 
rock crevice habitat rather than tree hollows (Ecologia, 2010c).  If it is assumed that the melanic form 
forages  on  plant  material  in  a  similar  manner  to  that  shown  more  widely  for  the  Western  Spiny‐
Tailed  Skink  (brown  form),  significant  grazing  of  plant  material  by  livestock  is  likely  to  be  the  most 
significant risk to the species, which reduces feeding habitat, and indirectly by reducing invertebrate 
prey.    

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
236
Surveys by Ecologia (2009c) of alternate proposed Rail Corridors and the current Proposal Area have 
substantially  increased  the  known  population  of  the  species  with  more  than  50  new  locations 
discovered, all clustered around emergent granite formations ranging in size from hills to low rises. 
Numerous  Western  Spiny‐Tailed  Skinks  (black  form)  were  found  inhabiting  granite  outcrops  within 
the Proposal Area to the southwest of Weld Range, sheltered in the horizontal rock crevices that had 
formed in weathered granite outcrops.  Figure 8‐1 depicts the location of populations or individuals. 
Ecologia  recently  commissioned  a  regional  survey  for  the  Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink  (black  form), 
publication pending.  The preliminary findings of this survey have confirmed that this species has a 
much  broader  range  than  previously  known,  with  new  populations  being  identified  up  to  90  km 
north, and up to 130 km south of the Proposal Area (Figure 8‐3). 
OPR is committed to preserving the skink population in the area and as part of a management plan 
for  the  species,  the  route  of  the  track  will  be  diverted  within  the  Proposal  Area  to  avoid  known 
habitat.  A total of twelve separate populations of Western Spiny‐tailed Skink were found inhabiting 
granite outcrops within the Proposal Area.  For all but two of these known populations, the rail line 
has been deviated to provide a 200 m buffer zone between known populations and the rail line. 
200 m was considered to be a suitable buffer as the skinks are predominantly sedentary and confined 
to  discrete  granite  outcrop  habitats  (see  Appendix  2).  This  buffer  was  recommended  by  fauna 
specialists (Ecologia, 2010c). 
While the two remaining populations may potentially be bisected by the rail line, a buffer of 50 to 60 
m will be maintained and no granite outcrops will be directly impacted.  In addition, all borrow areas 
will be located outside of the buffer area.   
Although  it  is  thought  that  the  skinks  can  move  up  to  500  m  (based  on  genetic  studies),  this  is 
thought to be rare.  The maximum distance an individual Western Spiny‐tailed Skink has been known 
to travel is 350 from its original location (Ecologia 2010c). 
Studies  of  a  closely  related  species  to  the  Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink  and  showing  a  similar  life 
history strategy,  E. cunninghami, found that 92% of individuals had moved less than 11 metres when 
recaptured  (Ecologia  2010).    This  contributes  to  the  view  that  the  Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink  is 
generally likely to stay within a limited area.  
Of  note  is  that  the  species  is  considered  to  adapt  well  to  disturbance  by  utilising  waste  rock  as 
habitat (Ecologia, 2010c).   
The species is therefore unlikely to be significantly affected by the Proposal.   
Additional information on this species in included in Section 7.3.4.1. 
Will the action lead to a long‐term decrease in the size of an important population of a species? 
It is unlikely that the Proposal will lead to a long‐term decrease in the size of an important population 
of the species.  Ecologia surveys have contributed substantially to the knowledge of the distribution 
and abundance of the species including identification of more than 50 new locations of the species 
(Ecologia,  2010c).    Ecologia  undertook  a  regional  assessment  survey  in  April  2010,  which  aimed  at 
better  defining  the  abundance  and  location  of  potential  habitat  in  the  region.    The  results  of  this 
survey have significantly increased the known abundance and distribution of the species (Figure 8‐3). 
Will the action reduce the area of occupancy of an important population? 
Approximately  twelve  individual  populations  of  Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink  (black  form)  have  been 
found along the Proposal Area.   

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
237
In order to prevent impacts on these populations, the following strategies will be adopted: 
 
maintaining a 200 m buffer between the final rail centreline and any known colonies or 
individuals where practicable; 
 
maintaining a 50 – 60 m buffer between the final rail centreline and the two known 
colonies where a 200 m buffer is not possible; 
 
ensuring all supporting facilities such as borrow areas, turkeys nests, access tracks etc are 
located outside of the 200 m buffer area; 
 
provision of fauna passages below the rail line to allow movement between populations 
located within 50‐60 m of the rail (only two locations); and 
 
translocation of individuals to habitats away from the development prior to construction, if 
required. 
Will the action fragment an existing important population into two or more populations? 
Western  Spiny‐tail  Skinks  live  in  colonies  predominantly  within  the  same  rocky  outcrop  and 
movements  between  outcrops  are  thought  to  be  low.    Evidence  of  low  dispersal  rates  has  been 
found from genetic analysis and recapture studies of populations (Gardner et al. 2001; Gardner et al
2007).    Studies  in  Egernia  cunninghami,  a  species  closely  related  to  the  Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink 
(black form) and showing a similar life history strategy, found that 92% of individuals had moved less 
that 11 m when recaptured (Stow and Sunnucks 2004).  A low dispersal rate may be expected based 
on  the  patchy  nature  of  Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink’s  preferred  habitat;  rocky  outcrops  often 
separated from each other by large expanses of flat, often sparsely vegetated land. 
As Western Spiny‐tail Skinks live in colonies within predominantly the same outcrop it is unlikely that 
the  proposed  action  will  fragment  an  existing  important  population  into  two  or  more  populations.  
Although  no  significant  movement  is  anticipated  between  populations,  provision  will  be  made  for 
fauna passages below the rail line to allow for potential movement.  Skinks have also been observed 
climbing  and  jumping  between  rocks  when  moving  between  crevices  within  an  outcrop  and  are 
therefore considered also to be capable of crossing train tracks (Ecologia, 2010). 
Will the action adversely affect habitat critical to the survival of the species? 
The  proposed  action  is  unlikely  to  adversely  affect  habitat  critical  to  the  survival  of  the  Western 
Spiny‐tailed  Skink.    The  Proposal  will  maintain  a  200 m  buffer  between  the  rail  and  any  known 
colonies or individuals where practicable.  In addition, culverts which will also serve as small fauna 
passages  will  be  established  along  the  designated  sections  of  the  rail  line  to  allow  for  potential 
movement between areas of habitat. 
Will the action disrupt the breeding cycle of an important population? 
The proposed action is unlikely to disrupt the breeding cycle of an important population of Western 
Spiny‐Tail  Skinks  as  a  200 m  buffer  will  be  maintained  between  the  rail  centreline  and  any  known 
colonies or individuals where practicable.   
Will the action modify, destroy, remove or isolate or decrease the availability of quality of habitat 
to the extent that the species is likely to decline? 
The  proposed  action  is  unlikely  to  decrease  the  availability  or  quality  of  habitat  available  to  the 
Western Spiny‐Tailed Skink, and may even create additional habitat, as occurred alongside the linear 
infrastructure of the Koolanooka power line.   

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
238
A 200 m wide buffer will be maintained between the rail centreline and known colonies or individuals 
where practicable.  Fauna passages will assist the movement of individuals across the rail centreline. 
Will  the  action  result  in  invasive  species  that  are  harmful  to  a  vulnerable  species  becoming 
established in the vulnerable species’ habitat? 
The proposed action is unlikely to introduce invasive species that are harmful to the Western Spiny‐
tailed Skink.  Invasive species are not a known threat to the Western Spiny‐tailed Skink.  The principle 
threatening  process  that  has  contributed  to  the  decline  of  the  black  form  of  the  species  is 
overgrazing by livestock which reduces food availability or the species. 
Will the action introduce disease that may cause the species to decline? 
The proposed action is unlikely to introduce disease that may cause the Western Spiny‐tailed Skink to 
decline.  Disease is not a known threat to the Western Spiny‐tailed Skink. The principle threatening 
process  that  has  contributed  to  the  decline  of  the  black  form  of  the  species  is  overgrazing  by 
livestock which reduces food availability or the species. 
Will the action interfere substantially with the recovery of the species? 
The action is unlikely to interfere substantially with the recovery of the Western Spiny‐tailed Skink.  
Surveys  conducted  by  Ecologia  have  significantly  increased  knowledge  on  the  abundance  and 
distribution  of  the  black  form  of  the  skink.    This  knowledge  will  better  inform  the  planning  of 
recovery actions.  Ecologia are undertook a regional assessment survey in April 2010 which intended 
to better define the abundance and location of potential habitat in the region. 
 
 

!
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
(
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
C
U
E
M
ul
le
w
a
M
U
R
C
H
IS
O
N
SA
N
D
ST
O
N
E
M
ee
ka
th
ar
ra
M
IL
LY
 M
IL
LY
M
ou
nt
 M
ag
ne
t
G
er
al
dt
on
20
00
00
30
00
00
40
00
00
50
00
00
60
00
00
70
00
00
680
000
0
690
000
0
700
000
0
710
000
0

Yüklə 26,37 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   ...   41




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə