Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 26,37 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə38/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü26,37 Mb.
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41

Management Strategies 
Relevant 
EMP 
Phase 
Responsible Persons 
Prepare and implement a Waste Management Plan based on the hierarchy of waste minimisation: 
   1. Waste avoidance/reduction. 
   2. Reuse, recycling and reclamation. 
   3. Waste treatment. 
   4. Waste disposal.   
The plan will include the following actions: 
 
prior to construction and prior to operation Proposal waste audits will be conducted to: 
    - identify proposal waste streams; 
    - quantify and characterise the waste types; 
    - establish how each waste stream is generated; and 
    - identify options to minimise each of the waste streams. 
 
ensure that litter is minimised, and waste disposal, storage or transport occurs in accordance with relevant waste legislation and guidelines; 
 
appropriate containers (vermin-proof) will be provided for putrescible waste and these wastes will be disposed of at a licensed facility; 
 
appropriate facilities will be provided for waste materials, with separate areas for recyclable materials.  Facilities will be secure and clearly labelled for the various 
waste streams; 
 
concrete wastes and concrete wash out will be contained in lined bunds; and 
 
conduct a waste management audit every three years. 
Waste 
Management 
Plan 
Construction 
& Operation 
Environment Manager, 
Construction Manager, 
Operations Manager 
Greenhouse Gases 
Energy use monitoring will be undertaken monthly and results reported to OPR Management. 
Greenhouse 
Gas 
Management 
Plan 
(GHGMP) 
Construction 
& Operation 
Environment Manager 
OPR will identify and comply with all energy usage and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) reporting requirements, and any future Commonwealth GHG legislation. 
GHGMP Construction 
& Operation 
Environment Manager 
Construction and operations will be conducted with efficiency of energy use as a guiding principal to reduce unnecessary GHG emissions GHGMP 
Design, 
Construction 
and Operation 
Project Engineer, 
Operations Manager, 
Environment Manager 
Consider fuel efficiency and emissions profiles for all new locomotive purchases. 
GHGMP Construction 
& Operation 
Operations Manager 
Report GHG emissions in accordance with National Greenhouse Emissions Reduction Scheme 
GHGMP Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
Participate in the Commonwealth Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme as required 
GHGMP Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
Benchmark greenhouse emissions targets for each major phase of the Proposal against best practice. 
GHGMP 
Operation 
Operations Manager, 
Environment Manager 
Conduct annual energy audits of operations 
GHGMP Operation 
Operations 
Manager, 
Environment Manager 
Implement energy saving strategies for the rail system addressing factors such as fuel type, equipment design, rail design, operational procedures, schedules, loading 
and unloading systems, and technology. 
GHGMP Construction 
& Operation 
Operations Manager 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
263
Management Strategies 
Relevant 
EMP 
Phase 
Responsible Persons 
Heritage 
Aboriginal Heritage will be managed in accordance with the OPR Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Management Plan (ACHMP).  The ACHMP will include the following 
commitments: 
 
as part of the ongoing consultation with Traditional Owners (TOs) regarding Heritage, inform TOs on relevant  proposed works, work schedules, and potential 
impacts on sites throughout the life of the Proposal; 
 
undertake indigenous heritage surveys within proposed disturbance envelopes using suitably qualified archaeologists and anthropologists as agreed with TOs; 
 
determine the nature, extent and significance of sites within the potential disturbance envelope; 
 
establish cultural heritage database with GIS records of indigenous heritage site locations within the Proposal Area; 
 
consider indigenous cultural heritage in Proposal planning and detailed design, avoiding significant sites where practicable; 
 
seek approval to disturb known sites under section 18 of the AH Act where a known Aboriginal site impact is unavoidable; 
 
document the location of protected indigenous heritage areas and make available (acknowledging confidentiality issues) to relevant employees; 
 implement 
conditions 
of any s18 applications; 
 
audit implementation of s18 conditions and ground disturbance procedures; 
 
implement the OPR ground disturbance permitting procedure incorporating checks on heritage sites and exclusion zones; 
 
implement procedures outlined in the ACHMP if a suspected heritage site is detected; 
 
if appropriate, mark and signpost sites to reduce the likelihood of inadvertent damage; and 
 
monitor clearing/earthworks activities with qualified site heritage monitors. 
ACHMP  
Construction 
Heritage Manager 
Visual Amenity 
Undertake visual amenity modelling for public viewscapes through the Wokatherra Gap and Chapman Valley areas.   
Visual 
Amenity 
Management 
Plan (VAMP) 
Design Environment 
Manager 
OPR will develop a VAMP that will be prepared with reference to the following guidelines: 
 
Guidelines for Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment (Landscape Institute and Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment, 2002); 
 
Visual Landscape Planning in WA (WAPC 2007); and 
 
Reading the remote: landscape characters of Western Australia (CALM; 2004). 
The VAMP is to include the following elements: 
 
identify and assess the visual landscape characteristics of the key public viewscapes, in particular through the Wokatherra Gap and Chapman Valley project areas; 
 
identify the potential visual and amenity issues identified through the visual and amenity modelling; 
 
identify mitigation measures, in particular to ensure that visual impacts from public viewscapes are maintained; 
 
management and mitigation measures to minimise the exposure of residence locations to any lighting
 
considerations of viewscapes from residences will be included in land access negotiations; 
 
minimisation of the height of the rail embankment; and 
 
minimisation of lighting exposure through compliance with Australian Standard AS4282-1997: Control of Obtrusive Effects of Outdoor Lighting. 
VAMP Design 
Construction  
Operations 
Environment Manager 
Other Social and Economic 
Undertake progressive rehabilitation of disturbed areas to minimise the visual effect of bare earth 
VFMP Construction 
Construction Manager 
Use local provenance species and matching local relative plant densities and strata in rehabilitation areas 
VFMP 
Construction 
Construction Manager 
Environment Manager 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
264
Management Strategies 
Relevant 
EMP 
Phase 
Responsible Persons 
Rail Safety and Risk will be managed according to the Rail Safety Act 1998 including risk assessment and safety provisions for all level crossings. 
-  
Design, 
Construction 
& Operation 
Safety Manager 
In accordance with access agreements and leases negotiated with the State, signage will be erected and maintained to alert members of the public to risks and hazards 
and exclude them from construction and operational areas. 
Traffic 
Management 
Plan 
Construction 
& Operation 
Public Relations 
Manager 
Include Public Risk in Risk Assessment and Risk Management programmes 
-  
Construction 
& Operation 
Public Relations 
Manager 
Public notices shall be communicated prior to any works taking place that may affect public access. 
-  
Construction 
& Operation 
Public Relations 
Manager 
Prepare and implement a Traffic Management Plan that includes designated traffic areas, measures for safe traffic interactions with the public and arrangements with 
local government and Main Roads WA.  The plan will include the following actions: 
 
At intersections with public access roads, maintain a visual inspection and cleanup routine to minimise dust spill and spread onto public roads 
 
Traffic will be minimised at public access areas 
 
Specify ongoing consultation arrangements with Local Shires and Main Roads WA. 
Traffic 
Management 
Plan 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction Manager, 
Operations Manager, 
Public Relations 
Manager 
Matters of National Environmental Significance (NES) 
Where practicable, rocky outcrops and large trees will be left in situ for fauna habitat. 
FMP Design 

Construction 
Construction Manager 
Minimise trench length where practicable.  Should trenching be required for distances in excess of 1000 m, inspect trenches and excavations outside of construction 
envelopes regularly and where any trenching is to remain open overnight, provide fauna ramps and inspect before work resumes the next morning to remove any 
trapped fauna 
FMP Construction 
Construction Manager, 
Environment Manager 
All disturbance areas have or will be surveyed for EPBC protected species prior to disturbance.  The survey information will be included in OPR databases and 
documented to ensure that OPR will not disturb species or their habitat beyond the disturbance areas approved in the PER.  Should these species be found during 
construction in locations where impacts are unavoidable, OPR will minimise the disturbance in those areas and will seek permission to disturb. 
FMP Construction 
Construction Manager, 
Environment Manager 
Turkeys nest dams will be fenced to restrict access by fauna. Fauna escape methods such as wire mesh will be fixed within turkeys nests to allow fauna egress.  
FMP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction Manager, 
Operations Manager 
No domestic animals or pets will be permitted on site 
FMP Construction 
& Operation 
Construction Manager, 
Operations Manager 
Feral animal controls will be specified in the Fauna Management Plan.  Control strategies will be developed consistent with regional and local feral animal control 
initiatives. 
FMP Construction 
& Operation 
Environmental 
Manager 
Include NES fauna protection specifications in all construction related contracts 
FMP Construction 
Construction Manager 
Induct all workforce on NES fauna identification and encounter procedures (including feeding, littering, interaction etc) 
FMP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction Manager, 
Operations Manager 
Apply and enforce speed limits to vehicles within potential NES fauna habitat 
FMP Construction 
& Operation 
Construction Manager, 
Operations Manager 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
265
9.2.2 
Rehabilitation and Closure 
It is the intention of the WA Government that the larger OPR Proposal will form a key link between 
Mid‐West mining operations and export markets.  Therefore the closure of the OPR Proposal is not 
expected to result in the closure of the land developed by the Proposal, as the WA Government (or 
others with the authority of the Government) will simply take over the rail operations. 
There will be large areas of land that is required to be cleared for construction purposes but will not 
be  required  during  operation.    This  may  include  land  previously  used  for  the  following  Proposal 
facilities: 
 
borrow  areas  –  a  majority  of  the  borrow  areas  will  not  be  required  for  maintenance 
purposes and therefore will be rehabilitated; 
 
turkey’s  nests  –  all  turkey’s  nests  not  required  for  maintenance  purposes  will  be  drained 
and rehabilitated; 
 
quarries  –  Small  portions  of  each  of  the  quarries  may  remain  open  to  provide  access  for 
rock  material  during  maintenance,  however  the  remainder  of  the  quarries  will  be 
rehabilitated; 
 
access tracks – Access roads along the railway will remain open for maintenance purposes 
however  many  other  access  tracks  (such  as  access  to  borrow  areas  etc)  will  be 
rehabilitated; and 
 
accommodation camps – Of the six accommodation camps proposed only one or two of the 
camps  will  remain  open  during  operation  of  the  Proposal.  All  others  will  be 
decommissioned and rehabilitated.  In addition, portions of the remaining camps will also 
be decommissioned and rehabilitated. 
 These areas will be rehabilitated to form a safe, stable, self sustaining and not polluting landform.   
Table  9‐4  summarises  the  management  strategies  to  be  implemented  for  those  areas  to  be 
rehabilitated. 
Table 9‐4  Rehabilitation management strategies 
Management Strategies 
Phase 
Responsible 
Persons 
Rehabilitation requirements will include the provision of suitable fauna habitat 
Construction & 
Operation 
Environment Manager, 
Construction Manager 
Prepare and implement a VFMP which will include the following: 
 
Records  of the areas and prescriptions used for clearing and rehabilitation will be 
maintained in a separate Rehabilitation Register 
 
Rehabilitation prescriptions for different vegetation types and soil types to include 
local native species with seed sourced locally where possible. 
 
Initial clearing will occur as close as practicable to first construction activities  
 
Direct seeding and/or planting will be undertaken to stabilise surfaces and integrate 
landforms into the surrounding landscape and ecosystems 
 
Stockpiled vegetation and topsoil will be stored away from water courses and spread 
over disturbed areas that are no longer required 
 
Rehabilitated areas will be constructed to blend in and allow suitable habitat for 
recolonising fauna.   
 
Topsoil management procedures will be developed and implemented to ensure that 
suitable topsoil and cleared vegetation is available for rehabilitation of cleared areas 
 
The impact on active creek beds will be minimised and any additional construction 
areas will be rehabilitated as soon as practicable after construction  
 
Bores not required will be decommissioned.  Remaining bores will be capped and 
locked for potential future use 
 
Salvage and store topsoil so that rehabilitation of construction areas can be 
completed in a timely, effective and efficient manner 
 
Develop completion criteria and monitoring methods for the assessment of 
rehabilitation progress 
Construction & 
Operation 
Environment Manager, 
Construction Manager, 
Operations Manager 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
266
10 
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 
The Proponent, Oakajee Port and Rail (OPR), has considered the potential environmental impacts, 
undertaken substantial investigations and taken the results of these into account when preparing 
this Public Environmental Review (PER).  Given the Proposal design considerations and the 
implementation of management strategies outlined in this PER, OPR considers that the Proposal can 
be implemented consistent with Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) objectives and without 
risk to matters of National Environmental Significance (NES).   
The development of the Proposal shall not impact upon any Threatened Ecological Community (TEC), 
Priority Ecological Communities (PEC) or Declared Rare Flora (DRF). Based on predictions of clearing 
using the indicative Rail Corridor alignment five out of the 87 species of Priority Flora recorded within 
the  Study  Area  will  be  impacted,  to  a  maximum  of  3.8%  of  their  known  population.    Additional 
surveys  prior  to  disturbance  will  be  commissioned  for  those  species  with  the  highest  risk  of  being 
significantly impacted. 
There will be minimal disturbance to significant vegetation communities.  Significant Beard and Burns 
(1976) associations will be cleared by a maximum of 0.2% of their pre‐European extent.  A minimum 
of 92% of significant Ecologia (2010a) vegetation units will remain unaffected by the Proposal. 
The Proposal does not impact upon any existing conservation reserves, with the exception of Reserve 
16200,  which  has  been  vested  in  the  Minister  for  Water  for  the  conservation  of  water  supply  and 
conservation of flora and fauna.  Approximately 14.6% of Reserve 16200 will be impacted.   
The  expected  maximum  disturbance  to  the  Narloo,  Woolgorong  and  Twin  Peaks  proposed 
conservation reserves, is 0.2%, 0.2% and 1.3% respectively.   
The development of the Proposal may result in the direct loss of some fauna due to accidental strikes 
of trains; however it is likely that over time local fauna will avoid the immediate area.  No significant 
impacts  are  expected  to  fauna  listed  under  the  Environmental  Protection  and  Biodiversity 
Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) and/or the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (WC Act), including the 
Malleefowl and Western Spiny‐tailed Skink. Significant impacts on SRE species is considered unlikely 
due  to  the  linear  nature  of  the  infrastructure  and  the  reduced  disturbance  footprint  within  the 
freehold  area.    No  significant  impacts  are  expected  for  subterranean  fauna  as  no  significant 
excavations or long term abstraction of large volumes of groundwater. 
There  may  be  minor,  localised  impacts  to  the  surface  hydrology  in  some  areas,  including  drainage 
shadow effects in sheetflow areas, and localised ponding along drainage lines.  The drainage shadow 
is  expected  to  be  limited  to  the  general  disturbance  envelope,  due  to  the  use  of  environmental 
culverts.  The  predicted  outcome  is  no  significant  indirect  impacts  to  sheetflow  dependent 
vegetation, such as Mulga. 
The  majority  of  groundwater  abstraction  within  the  Proposal  Area  will  be  short‐term  and/or 
relatively small volumes over a number of locations, which will substantially reduce the likelihood of 
unacceptable impact.  All groundwater use will be licensed under the Rights in Water and Irrigation 
Act 1914 (RIWI Act) which will ensure sustainable use. 
The  preferred  Rail  Corridor  alignment  has  been  selected  to  minimise  the  number  of  receptors 
impacted.    The  Proposal  will  result  in  three  residences  receiving  noise  in  excess  of  the  limit  set  in 
State  Planning  Policy  5.4  (SPP5.4),  and  seven  residences  receiving  noise  in  excess  of  target  criteria 
(WAPC  2009b).    Noise  mitigation  measures  may  include  external  noise  barriers,  internal  sound 
proofing  and  building.    Consultation  with  affected  landholders  will  determine  the  appropriate 
mitigation measures to be taken. 
Dust emissions are expected primarily during construction of the Proposal.  Emissions will be short‐
term and subject to best practice dust controls.   

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
267
The  waste  and  hazardous  material  issues  relating  to  this  Proposal  are  similar  to  those  faced  and 
managed by many other remote operations in Western Australia (WA).  Significant risk reduction will 
be achieved through the application of industry standard preventative controls, storage and handling 
standards, incident reporting and remedial capacity.   
It  is  anticipated  that  the  Proposal  will  contribute  approximately  0.02%  of  Australia’s  annual 
Greenhouse  Gas  (GHG)  emissions.    Emissions  will  be  reported  under  the  National  Greenhouse  and 
Energy  Reporting  Act  2007  (NGER  Act),  and  OPR  will  be  required  to  participate  in  the  proposed 
Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. 
Management  measures  will  minimise  the  risk  of  inadvertent  disturbance  to  registered  and 
unregistered Aboriginal heritage sites; however the Proposal will directly impact a number of sites.  
Permission  will  be  sought  under  the  Aboriginal  Heritage  Act  1972  (AH  Act)  for  disturbance  to  any 
registered  site.    Management  measures  will  minimise  the  risk  of  inadvertent  disturbance  to 
registered and unregistered sites. OPR will continue to liaise with Native Title claimants in the area 
and work towards creating sustainable opportunities for Aboriginal people. 
The design, alignment, and position of the Rail Corridor on lower relief land will prevent significant 
impacts  to  general  visual  amenity  in  agricultural  and  pastoral  landscapes  and  from  the  sensitive 
location  of  the  Moresby  Range.    Disturbance  minimisation  and  rehabilitation  will  minimise  any 
impacts to visual amenity as a result of the Proposal. 
Potential  environmental  and  social  impacts  associated  with  the  Proposal  are  summarised  in  Table 
10‐1, as well as proposed management strategies. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
268
Table 10‐1 
Potential environmental and social impacts 
Environmental 
Factor 
EPA Objective 
Existing Environment 
Potential Impacts 
Environmental Management 
Predicted Outcome 
BIOPHYSICAL 
Vegetation and 
Flora 
Maintain the 
abundance, 
biodiversity, 
geographic distribution 
and productivity of 
flora at species and 
ecosystem levels 
through the avoidance 
of adverse impacts 
and improvement of 
knowledge. 
  Native vegetation subject to broad 
scale grazing with low levels of 
disturbance throughout the pastoral 
area in the eastern two thirds of the 
Study Area 
  Approximately 830 vascular flora 
species recorded within the Study 
Area. 
  Largely cleared land used for 
farming with small, detached 
remnants of native vegetation in the 
western third of the Study Area 
(freehold area). 
  62 Weed species recorded within the 
Study Area, including 3 Declared 
Weeds occurring largely in the 
freehold area 
  26 Beard vegetation associations 
recorded within Study Area. 
  72 Ecologia vegetation units 
recorded within Study Area. 
  No TECs known from within the 
Study Area.   
  4 PECs known from within the Study 
Area. 
  3 EPBC Act listed flora species, 2 of 
which are DRF. 87 Priority Flora 
recorded within the Study Area. 
  Agricultural land use in the freehold 
area dominated by broad scale 
dryland farming with crops and 
pastures. 
 
  The most significant potential impact 
identified is the direct impact of clearing of 
native vegetation for construction of the Rail 
Corridor.  Most of the disturbance of native 
vegetation is in the pastoral area 5900 ha 
out of a total of 6000 ha). 
  Indirect impacts may also occur on 
vegetation within and immediately adjacent 
to the Rail Corridor and ancillary facilities 
from interference with local drainage 
patterns. 
  Spread of weeds, particularly from 
construction and maintenance activities 
  Indirect impacts through possible increases 
in the frequency of fire. 
  Increased risk of erosion and / or 
sedimentation impacting on vegetation. 
  Possible fragmentation of vegetation and 
flora populations, which may impact on 
population dynamics and increase edge 
effects 
 
  Clearing control system will be implemented to 
restrict the number and extent of cleared areas 
to the minimum needed for safe and efficient 
implementation of the Proposal.   
  Vegetation clearing will be minimised and will 
occur within clearly defined boundaries. 
  All conservation significant locations will be 
avoided where possible and will be marked 
with restricted access. 
  Throughout the freehold area native vegetation 
will not be cleared except for the purposes of 
the Rail Corridor itself and access tracks 
where alternative routes are not practicable. 
  Rail Corridor restricted to an average 100 m 
disturbance width through areas of native 
vegetation in the freehold area. 
  PECs will be avoided and a 50 m buffer will be 
put in place around these areas. 
  More detailed weed assessments completed 
along the corridor prior to significant ground 
disturbance and hygiene controls based on 
this information and consultation with 
landholders. 
  Restricted movement of topsoil and machinery 
or hygiene controls between sites where 
weeds could be spread to new locations during 
construction. 
  Workforce education to include weed 
awareness and control information. 
  Maintain Weed Hygiene Program such that 
weed inspection reports, records of weed 
hygiene certificates and weed survey data is 
recorded, assessed and reported.  The Weed 
Hygiene Program will be regularly reviewed. 
  Use incident reporting system to identify and 
rectify non-compliance with the Weed Hygiene 
Program, 
  Post-construction weed survey and weed 
control program to ensure that new weed 
infestations from construction activities are 
controlled. 
  Preparation and implementation of 
construction rehabilitation management plans 

Yüklə 26,37 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə