Oromucosal use or cutaneous use



Yüklə 0,61 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/7
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü0,61 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

Herbal preparation 

Pharmaceutical form 

Indication 

Strength 

Posology 

Period of medicinal use 

and fungicidal 

properties  

TTO for local application 

for treating microbial 

infections. 

TTO concentrations 

ranging from 1.0% to 

0.05%  

1997 


Combest  

US 


Cutaneous (and oromucosal) 

liquid 


treatment of skin 

infection, cut wounds, 

excoriation 

 

0.33 – 0.5 ml to be 



stirred in 50 ml of 

lukewarm water and 

the solution is applied 

on the skin with a 

sterile cotton wool or 

gauze. 


Since 2004 (Hungary) 

TTO for local application 

Uses described in 

pharmacopoeias and 

in traditional 

medicine: as an 

antiseptic and 

disinfectant for the 

treatment of wounds.  

Uses described in folk 

medicine: 

symptomatic 

treatment of burns, 

psoriasis 

external application at 

concentrations of 5-

100%, depending on 

skin disorder being 

treated 

2004 


World Health Organization  

International 

TTO 

As a disinfectant 



Several published 

reports have 

addressed minimum 

inhibitory and 

bactericidal 

concentrations of TTO 

against clinical isolates 

of S. aureus. A study 

of 105 clinical isolates 

of using a broth 

microdilution method 

found the105 clinical 

isolates of S. aureus 

MIC


90

 _= 0.5%.  

100 clinical isolates of 

methicillin-resistant S. 



aureus (MRSA) MIC

90 


= 0.32%.  

(Halcon & Milkus 2004). 

TTO for local application 

treatment of 

furunculosis 

Not specified 

1949  

British Pharmaceutical Codex 



(UK) 

 

 



Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 

and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 17/73 

 


 

Herbal preparation 

Pharmaceutical form 

Indication 

Strength 

Posology 

Period of medicinal use 

Cutaneous liquid 

for treatment of mild 

acne 


TTO diluted in olive oil 

or baby oil 1:9 (10%) 

and dabbed on the 

afflicted areas of the 

skin 1-3 times daily. 

Maximum duration of 

use 1 month. 

Not recommended for 

children under 12 

years of age.  

Since 1988 (Sweden) 

Cutaneous liquid 

disinfection in acne  

Before use dilute 1 

part of oil with 9 parts 

of olive oil or similar 

oil. To be applied 1-3 

times daily. 

Maximum duration of 

use 1 month. 

Not recommended for 

children under 12 

years of age. 

1993-2009 

(Denmark) 

Water based gel 

treatment of acne 

 

5% water based gel 



applied daily for 3 

months 


1990 

Bassett et al .(clinical trial) 

Cutaneous (and oromucosal) 

liquid 


treatment of acne 

 

0.33 – 0.5 ml to be 



stirred in 50 ml of 

lukewarm water and 

the solution is applied 

on the skin with a 

sterile cotton wool or 

gauze  


Since 2004 (Hungary) 

TTO for local application 

Uses supported by 

clinical data 

(reference to  

Bassett et al. 1990): 

topical application for 

symptomatic 

treatment of common 

skin disorders such as 

acne and furunculosis 

5% water based gel 

applied daily for 3 

months 


 

2004 


World Health Organization  

International  

solution (saponified) readily 

miscible in water containing 

35% of TTO  

peryonichia  

 

a) 10% watery lotion 



to be applied as 

impregnated dressing 

to be changed every 

24 hours. 

Moisten the dress with 

water if it becomes dry 

1930 

Humphery  



Australia 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 18/73 

 


 

Herbal preparation 

Pharmaceutical form 

Indication 

Strength 

Posology 

Period of medicinal use 

b) pure 35% TTO 

solution 

TTO for local application 

Peryonichia 

(paronychia), 

ringworm (tinea). 

Refers to 100% oil or 

a water soluble oil 

emulsion (Melasol

*



without relating to a 



specific indication 

1937  


Penfold and Morrison  

Australia 

 

TTO for local application 



tinea, paronychia 

Not specified 

1949  

British Pharmaceutical Codex 



(UK) 

TTO for local application 

Perionychia 

(paronychia) 

Refers to 100% oil or 

a water soluble oil 

emulsion (Melasol) 

without relating to a 

specific indication 

1950  


Penfold and Morrison  

Australia 

1) Undiluted TTO 

2) Melasol* – 40% TTO in water 

soluble emulsion (mixed with 

13% isopropyl alcohol)  

3) 8% extract of TTO in lanolin 

as an ointment 

Common foot 

problems:  

a) Reduce 

bromidrosis  

b) to eliminate odour 

and healing cracks 

and fissures, peeling 

and callused heels  

c) to reduce 

inflammation of 

corns, calluses, 

bunions, hammertoes  

d) Post-operative 

wound healing of 

chemical 

matricectomies 

e) post-surgical 

sutured wounds 

healing 

f) Relief of post-

treatment dryness 

following copper 

sulphate 

iontophoresis for 

tinea pedis 

g) onychomycosis 

h) prevention of tinea 

pedis 


a) half once of Melasol 

in 22 gallons of water: 

apply once daily or as 

a whirlpool additive for 

hydrotherapy 

b) Melasol – 40% TTO 

in water soluble 

emulsion (mixed with 

13% isopropyl 

alcohol): daily 

application 

c) Melasol – 40% TTO 

in water soluble 

emulsion (mixed with 

13% isopropyl 

alcohol): daily 

application to irritated 

areas 


d) Melasol – 40% TTO 

in water soluble 

emulsion (mixed with 

13% isopropyl alcohol) 

post-operative 

dressing 

e) Melasol – 40% TTO 

in water soluble 

emulsion (mixed with 

13% isopropyl 

alcohol): apply twice 

1972  


Walker  

USA 


*

 a preparation containing 40% of TTO in a soap base called Melasol in Australia and Ti.Trol solution in England (Anonimous 

1933) 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 19/73 

 

                                                



 

Herbal preparation 

Pharmaceutical form 

Indication 

Strength 

Posology 

Period of medicinal use 

daily 


f) Melasol – 40% TTO 

in water soluble 

emulsion (mixed with 

13% isopropyl 

alcohol): daily 

massages before 

iontophoresis and 

application twice a 

week after 

iontophoresis 

g) TTO: apply twice 

daily (morning and 

evening, 1 to 6 

months)  

h) 8% extract of TTO 

in lanolin as an 

ointment 

Cutaneous liquid 

against itch at mild 

athlete´s foot 

TTO diluted in olive oil 

or baby oil 1:9 (10%) 

and dabbed on the 

afflicted areas of the 

skin 1-3 times daily. 

Maximum duration of 

use 1 month. 

Not recommended for 

children under 12 

years of age. 

Since 1988 (Sweden) 

Cutaneous liquid 

disinfection in fungal 

infections on the foot  

Before use dilute 1 

part of oil with 9 parts 

of olive oil or similar 

oil. To be applied 1-3 

times daily. 

Maximum duration of 

use 1 month. 

Not recommended for 

children under 12 

years of age. 

1993-2009 

(Denmark) 

TTO for local application 

Onychomycosis 

100% TTO  

Tong et al. 1992 

(clinical trial) 

TTO for local application 

tinea pedis 

10% TTO  

Buck et al. 1994 

(clinical trial) 

TTO for local application 

athlete’s foot 

dilute the concentrated 

oil with an equal 

amount of water or 

vegetable oil and apply 

1999 

Combest  



US 

 

 



Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 

and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 20/73 

 


 

Herbal preparation 

Pharmaceutical form 

Indication 

Strength 

Posology 

Period of medicinal use 

to the affected area 

three times a day with 

a cotton ball  

TTO for local application 

Uses supported by 

clinical data: topical 

application for 

symptomatic 

treatment of common 

skin disorders such as 

tinea pedis, 

bromidrosis and 

mycotic onychia 

(onychomycosis)  

external application at 

concentrations of 5-

100%, depending on 

skin disorder being 

treated 


2004 

World Health Organization  

International 

solution readily miscible in 

water containing 35% of TTO 

(saponified) 

to clear up sore 

throats in the early 

stages  

20 drops in a glass of 

warm water used as a 

gargle 


1930 

Humphery  

Australia 

TTO for local application  

  

Use as an antiseptic 



for special and 

general dental 

surgery  

100% TTO 

or 

40% TTO in water 



soluble emulsion 

(Melasol) 

1930  

MacDonald  



Australia 

TTO for local application 

Throat and mouth 

condition including 

acute 

nasopharyngitis, 



catarrh, thrush, 

aphthous stomatitis, 

tonsillitis, mouth 

ulcers, sore throat, 

pyorrhoea, gingivitis.  

Refers to 100% oil or 

a water soluble oil 

emulsion (Melasol) 

without relating to a 

specific indication  

1937  

Penfold and Morrison  



Australia 

 

TTO for local application 



thrush and stomatitis 

Not specified 

1949 British Pharmaceutical 

Codex (UK) 

TTO for local application  

 

Extensive application 



in surgical and dental 

practice. Throat and 

mouth condition 

including acute 

nasopharyngitis, 

catarrh, thrush, 

aphthous stomatitis, 

tonsillitis, mouth 

ulcers, sore throat, 

pyorrhoea, gingivitis. 

Antiseptic agent in 

denture and mouth 

washes. 

Refers to 100% oil or 

a water soluble oil 

emulsion (Melasol) 

without relating to a 

specific indication 

1950  

Penfold and Morrison  



Australia 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 21/73 

 


 

Herbal preparation 

Pharmaceutical form 

Indication 

Strength 

Posology 

Period of medicinal use 

TTO for local application 

treatment of 

stomatitis, gingivitis. 

 

0.17 – 0.33 ml 



(0.15735-0.47205 g) 

to be mixed in 100 ml 

of water for gargle 

several times daily. 

Since 2004 (Hungary) 

TTO for local application 

Uses described in folk 

medicine: 

symptomatic 

treatment of 

gingivitis, stomatitis, 

tonsillitis 

external application at 

concentrations of 5-

100%, depending on 

skin disorder being 

treated 

2004 


World Health Organization  

International 

TTO for local application 

a) As an aid to clear 

head cold symptoms.  

b) as a spray for 

nasopharynx  

a) A few drops inhaled 

from handkerchief  

b) TTO diluted with 

paraffin  

1930 


Humphery  

Australia 

TTO for local application 

nasopharyngitis, 

catarrh 

Refers to 100% oil or 

a water soluble oil 

emulsion (Melasol) 

without relating to a 

specific indication 

1937 

Penfold and Morrison  



Australia 

TTO for local application 

as inhalant in coryza 

Not specified 

1949 British Pharmaceutical 

Codex (UK) 

TTO for local application  

nasopharyngitis, 

catarrh 

Refers to 100% oil or 

a water soluble oil 

emulsion (Melasol) 

without relating to a 

specific indication 

1950  

Penfold and Morrison  



Australia 

TTO for local application 

Uses described in folk 

medicine: 

symptomatic 

treatment of coughs 

and colds, 

nasopharyngitis, 

sinus congestion 

 

2004 



World Health Organization  

International 

 

Long-standing use since at least 30 years, 15 of them within the European community, is therefore 



demonstrated for the following preparations and indications: 

1) Liquid preparation containing 0.5% to 10% of essential oil to be applied on the affected area 1-3 

times daily for treatment of small superficial wounds and insect bites. Traditional use of this 

preparation is substantiated by the presence in the BPC 1949, by the European market overview (in 

Sweden since 1988, registered in Hungary since 2004) and by the widespread use in Australia 

documented since 1930. 

2) Oily liquid or semi-solid preparation, containing 10% of essential oil, to be applied on the affected 

area 1-3 times daily or 0.7-1 ml of essential oil stirred in 100 ml of lukewarm water to be applied as an 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 22/73 

 


 

impregnated dressing to the affected areas of the skin for treatment of small boils (furuncles and mild 

acne). Traditional use of this preparation is substantiated by the presence in the BPC 1949 (treatment 

of furunculosis), by the European market overview (in Sweden since 1988, in Denmark from 1993 to 

2009) and by the widespread use in Australia. 

3) Oily liquid or semi-solid preparation, containing 10% of essential oil, to be applied on the affected 

area 1-3 times daily for the relief of itching and irritation in cases of mild athlete´s foot. Traditional use 

of this preparation is substantiated by the European market overview (in Sweden since 1988, in 

Denmark from 1993 to 2009) and by the widespread use in USA, documented since 1972, and in 

Australia documented since 1930. 

4) 0.17–0.33 ml of TTO to be mixed in 100 ml of water for rinse or gargle several times daily for 

symptomatic treatment of minor inflammation of oral mucosa. Traditional use of this preparation is 

substantiated by the presence in the BPC 1949 (stomatitis) and by the European market overview 

(registered in Hungary since 2004) and by the widespread use in Australia documented since 1937. 



3. 

 

Non-Clinical Data 

3.1. 

 

Overview of available pharmacological data regarding the herbal 

substance(s), herbal preparation(s) and relevant constituents thereof 

Based on results of laboratory and animal studies, there are several likely mechanisms by which a 

topical TTO preparation may facilitate healing in chronic Staphylococcus-infected wounds. Preliminary 

studies suggest both reduction in microbial load and changes in immune function related to TTO 

applications. Terpinen-4-ol, linalool, and α-terpineol are the most studied active antibacterial 

components of TTO (Halcon & Milkus 2004). 



Primary pharmacology  

Antibacterial activity 

The oil exhibits a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity in vitro although its efficacy in vivo remains 

relatively unsubstantiated. Antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, both methicillin-

susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant (MRSA) has been demonstrated (Carson et al. 1996). 

Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) have been determined for many organisms including 

coagulase-negative staphylococci (0.06-3% v/v), S. aureus (including MRSA) (0.12-0.5%), 



Streptococcus spp. (0.03-0.12%), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) (0.5-1%), Acinetobacter 

baumannii (0.06-1%), Escherichia coli (0.12-0.25%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (0.12-0.5%), Candida 

albicans (0.12-0.25%), other Candida species (0.12-0.5%) and Malassezia furfur (0.12-0.25%). The 

wide range of organisms susceptible to TTO suggests that it may be useful for skin antisepsis. 

Furthermore, many organisms that colonise skin transiently have been shown to be more susceptible 

to TTO than commensal organisms (Carson et al. 1998). 

MICs of TTO range from 0.06 to 0.5% (v/v) for Escherichia coliStaphylococcus aureus and 

Streptococcus spp., and 2 to 8% (v/v) for Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Longbottom et al. 2004). 

A study was carried out to evaluate the activities of TTO against lactobacilli and a range of organisms 

associated with bacterial vaginosis. MIC data indicated that a variety of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria 

are susceptible to TTO. The data also show that all lactobacilli tested were appreciably more resistant 

to TTO than organisms known to be associated with bacterial vaginosis, with at least a twofold 

difference in MIC

90

 results. Therefore, authors suggested that previous clinical success reported by 



Blackwell may be due, in part, to the susceptibility of bacterial vaginosis-associated organisms to TTO 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 23/73 

 


 

and the relative resistance of commensal Lactobacillus spp.. The authors suggested that this difference 

in susceptibility could allow formulation of products that will selectively kill or inhibit certain organisms 

while having a minimal effect on the commensal lactobacilli (Hammer et al. 1999).  



In vitro studies established that MIC and MBC (minimum bactericidal concentration) of TTO range from 

0.003 to 2.0% (v/v). Studies indicate that several oral bacteria are susceptible, suggesting that TTO 

may be used in oral healthcare products and in maintenance of oral hygiene (Hammer et al. 2003a).  

TTO and α-terpineol and terpinen-4-ol shows to have antibacterial activity against growth of S. aureus 

and E. coli biofilms at concentration about 0.78%. Terpinen-4-ol seems to have the most potent 

activity (Budzynska et al. 2011).  

The in vitro activity of TTO against MRSA has been shown many times with minimum inhibitory 

concentrations ranging from 0.25% to 2% (Edmonson et al. 2011). 

The broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of TTO is mainly attributed to terpinen-4-ol and 1,8-cineole, 

major components of the oil, and includes antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antiprotozoal and 

antimycoplasmal activities, all promoting TTO as therapeutic agent (Furneri et al.2006). 

McMahon et al. (2007) has suggested that the treatment of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative 

bacteria with low levels of TTO results in organisms becoming less susceptible to antibiotics when 

compared to cells not treated with TTO. One interpretation of these data is that cells undergo an 

adaptive response that produced cross-tolerance to conventional antimicrobial agents in addition to 

potentially protecting cells from TTO.  

The effect of sub-lethal challenge with TTO on the antibiotic resistance profiles of staphylococci has 

been studied. Isolates of MRSA and MSSA and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were 

habituated to sub-lethal concentrations of TTO (72 h). Following habituation, the minimum inhibitory 

concentrations (MIC) of antibiotics and TTO were determined. Habituated MRSA⁄MSSA cultures had 

higher (P < 0.05) MIC values than control cultures for the examined antibiotics. Habituated 

MRSA⁄MSSA cultures also displayed decreased susceptibility to TTO. Conclusions of the authors were 

that TTO habituation ‘stress-hardens’ MRSA and MSSA was evidenced by transient decreased antibiotic 

susceptibility and stable decreased TTO susceptibility. Although TTO habituation did not decrease 

susceptibility of CoNS to TTO, such cultures showed transient decreased antibiotic susceptibility. 

Results suggested that application of TTO at sub-lethal concentrations may reduce the efficacy of 

topical antibiotics used with TTO in combination therapies (McMahon et al. 2008). 

Carson (2009), Thomsen et al. (2009) and Hammer & Riley (2009) attempted to reproduce the results 

of McMahon et al. (2007), but were unsuccessful. The authors have suggested that exposure to sub-

inhibitory concentrations of TTO does not appear to affect the susceptibility or resistance to 

conventional antibiotics. 

Carson et al. (2002) investigated the mechanisms of action of TTO and three of its components, 1,8-

cineole, terpinen-4-ol, and α-terpineol, against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144. They reported that 

treatment with the test compounds at the MIC and two times the MIC, reduced the viability of S



aureus, particularly the treatment with terpinen-4-ol and α –terpineol. None of the compounds caused 

lysis, as determined by measurement of the optical density at 620 nm, although cells became 

disproportionately sensitive to subsequent autolysis. S. aureus organisms treated with TTO or its 

components at the MIC or two times the MIC showed a significant loss of tolerance to NaCl.  

When the compounds were tested at one-half the MIC, only 1,8-cineole significantly reduced the 

tolerance of S. aureus to NaCl. Electron microscopy of terpinen-4-ol-treated cells showed the formation 

of mesosomes and the loss of cytoplasmic contents. The authors concluded that the predisposition to 

lysis, the loss of 260-nm-absorbing material, the loss of tolerance to NaCl, and the altered morphology 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 24/73 

 

1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə