Oromucosal use or cutaneous use



Yüklə 0,61 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə5/7
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü0,61 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7
Participants  

Posology  

Interventions  

Outcomes  

Comments  

Prevention 

of head lice  

Canyon & 

Speare 

2007  


Controlled 

experiments on 

researcher’s 

forearms  

Researcher  

Test materials applied with 

well-soaked cotton bud  

100% TTO 

compared to various other oils 

and neem insect repellent  

Positive control: N,N-Diethyl-

3-methylbenzamide (DEET) 

69.75 g/l  

Negative control: KY-Jelly, 

inert lubricant gel  

Lice applied to treated area 

after 2 mins  

TTO repelled 55% of 

head ice from treated 

area, followed by 

peppermint (34%) and 

DEET (26%).  

TTO was most effective 

at preventing lice from 

feeding (60%) followed 

by lavender (40%), 

peppermint (28%) and 

DEET (23%).  

Most repellents were 

not effective at causing 

lice to leave the 

treated site or prevent 

blood feeding 

 

Reduction 



of nickel-

induced 


contact 

hypersensiti

vity reaction  

Pearce et 



al. 2005  

4 arm 


controlled trial  

18 subjects with 

nickel 

hypersensitivity 



(17F/1M; 19-57 

years); 18 subjects 

used 100% TTO. 

7subjects used 

Macadamia oil.  

10 subjects used 

5% TTO and 

placebo lotion  

25 μl topical application 3 

and 5 days after nickel 

exposure  

Treatment 1: 100% TTO 

(complying with ISO4730);  

Control 1: 100% macadamia 

oil  

Treatment 2: 5% TTO lotion  



Control 2: placebo lotion (no 

TTO)  


 

100% TTO significantly 

reduced the flare area 

and erythema index 

when compared to the 

nickel-only sites. The 

other substances had 

no significant effect.  

No adverse 

skin 


reactions to 

TTO 


reported  

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  



 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  

Page 37/73 

 


 

Indication   Reference   Method  

Participants  

Posology  

Interventions  

Outcomes  

Comments  

Effectivenes

s of hand-

cleansing  

Messager 

et al. 2005  

Study 1: 3 arm 

controlled trial: 

Hygienic skin 

wash (HSW) 

and 5% TTO in 

Tween 80 vs. 

Soft Soap (SS) 

control;  

Study 2: 2 arm 

controlled trial: 

Alcoholic 

hygienic skin 

wash (AHSW) 

vs. Soft Soap 

(SS) control  

Study 1: 13 

subjects (8F/5M; 

22-52 yrs):  

Study 2: 14 

subjects (8F/6M; 

19-53 yrs)  

Followed ‘EN1499 

European Hand washing 

Method’ against E. coli

5ml of SS (control) or 

treatment antiseptic 

product poured into 

cupped hands pre-

moistened with tap water, 

and 6 steps of hand 

washing procedure 

performed. Enough water 

to create lather and hand 

wash continued for 60s.  

Hands rinsed under tap 

water for 15s from distal to 

proximal with fingertips 

upright. 

Treatments: HSW(5% TTO); 

AHSW (5% TTO, 10% 

alcohol); 5% TTO; 

0.001%(v/v) Tween 80 in 

sterile distilled water;  

Control: SS recommended by 

EN1499 (linseed oil; 

potassium hydroxide; ethanol, 

sterile distilled water)  

TTO meets ISO4730;  

 

 



5% TTO in Tween 80 

and AHSW were 

significantly more 

active than SS 

(control);  

HSW appeared slightly 

more active than SS 

(control) but difference 

not significant. 5% TTO 

in Tween 80 was 

significantly more 

active than HSW. 

 

Indication  



Reference  

Method  


Participants  

Posology  

Interventions  

Outcomes  

Comments  

Reduction 

of wheal 

and flare 

associated 

with 


histamine 

induced 


responses  

Khalil et al. 

2004 

Controlled trial, 



participants act 

as own control. 

Allocation of 

arms randomly 

assigned to 

control or 

treatment 

(alternating 

fashion)  

18 participants 

(testing 100% TTO)  

25 μl of TTO applied 

topically with a pipette to 

histamine-induced reaction 

area after 10 and 20mins  

Treatment: 100% TTO  

Control: no treatment  

TTO significantly 

reduced the wheal and 

flare response. 

Significant difference in 

flare observed 30mins 

from histamine 

injection and in wheal 

observed 50 mins from 

histamine injection.  

No adverse 

effects  

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  



 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  

Page 38/73 

 


 

Indication   Reference   Method  

Participants  

Posology  

Interventions  

Outcomes  

Comments  

Reduction 

of histamine 

induced 


skin 

inflammatio

n  

Koh et al. 



2002  

Controlled trial, 

participants act 

as own control. 

Allocation of 

arms randomly 

assigned to 

control or 

treatment 

(alternating 

fashion)  

21 participants 

testing 100% TTO 

(16F/5M; 23-56 

yrs);  

6 participants 



testing liquid 

paraffin (5F/1M; 23-

54 yrs)  

25μl of TTO applied 

topically with a pipette to 

histamine-induced reaction 

area after 20mins  

Treatment 1: 100% TTO  

Treatment 2: liquid paraffin  

Control: no treatment  

Mean weal volume 

significantly decreased 

after TTO application 

(30mins and 60mins) 

compared to control. 

Liquid paraffin had no 

significant effect on 

weal or flare. No 

difference in mean 

flare area between 

control and TTO.  

No adverse 

effects  

TTO – Tea Tree Oil  

F – Female  

M – Male 



 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  



 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  

Page 39/73 

 


 

4.1.2. 

 

Overview of pharmacokinetic data regarding the herbal 

substance(s)/preparation(s) including data on relevant constituents 

Considerable research has been done on the metabolism of monoterpenes. After rapid dermal and/or 

oral absorption, liver P450 mono-oxygenases are involved in biotransformation. Subsequently, 60-80% 

of absorbed monoterpenes are excreted as glucuronides (Villar et al. 1994). 

Cal and Krzyaniak (2006), Cal et al. (2006) and Cal (2008) studied the penetration behaviour of TTO 

and pure constituents using a flow-through diffusion cells, human skin preparations and in vivo human 

studies which represented infinitive dose and occlusive application conditions. TTO or pure terpene-4-ol 

caused a significant increase in the skin accumulation of terpene-4-ol in the hydrophilic skin layers 

(dermis and epidermis). 

The process of terpene penetration into the skin and through the skin can be considered to be strongly 

dependent on the experimental model used (choice of membrane, hydration level and dose) and on 

the carrier for the penetrating terpene, while in vivo the effect of evaporation – shown to be 98% 

needs to be considered. 

Human pharmacokinetic data are not available for tea tree oil. In vitro dermal penetration studies 

using human skin preparations indicate that dermal absorption of TTO components is relatively low, up 

2-4% of applied dose and the main components observed to penetrate were terpene-4-ol and α-

terpineol. As the components of TTO are semi-volatile, the majority of the applied dose evaporates 

from the surface of the skin (Cross et al. 2008). 



4.2. 

 

Clinical Efficacy 

Clinical trials have been performed to test the efficacy of topical TTO products for a range of conditions 

including acne, wound healing, mycosis (oral candidiasis, denture stomatitis, onychomycosis, tinea and 

tinea pedis), protozoan infections, herpes labialis, dandruff, tinea.  



4.2.1. 

 

Dose response studies 

Not applicable. 



4.2.2. 

 

Clinical studies (case studies and clinical trials) 

Clinical studies on effects of TTO were conducted for the following indications: 

-

 



Acne vulgaris 

-

 



Wound healing 

-

 



Protozoan infections 

-

 



Mycosis 

 



Onychomycosis 

 



Oropharyngeal candidiasis 

 



Denture stomatitis 

 



Tinea pedis 

 



Various dermatological mycosis 

 



C. albicans vaginal infection 

-

 



Recurrent herpes labialis 

-

 



Halitosis 

-

 



Supragingival plaque 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 40/73 

 


 

 

-

 



Minor skin lesions 

-

 



Dandruff 

Clinical studies conducted with combinations containing TTO:  

-

 



Mycosis 

 



Onychomycosis 

-

 



Pediculosis 

Clinical studies conducted with TTO:  

Acne vulgaris 

Bassett et al. 1990 and Enshaieh et al. 2007 conducted randomised controlled trials and reported on 

the use of TTO for the treatment of mild to moderate acne.  

A comparative study of tea-tree oil versus benzoylperoxide in the treatment of acne (Bassett et al. 

1990). 

A single-blind, randomised clinical trial on 124 patients to evaluate the efficacy and skin tolerance of 

5% TTO gel in the treatment of mild to moderate acne when compared with 5% benzoyl peroxide 

lotion was performed. The results of this study showed that both 5% tea-tree oil and 5% benzoyl 

peroxide had a significant effect in ameliorating the patients' acne by reducing the number of inflamed 

and non-inflamed lesions (open and closed comedones), although the onset of action in the case of 

tea-tree oil was slower. Fewer side effects were experienced by patients treated with tea-tree oil 

(Bassett et al. 1990).  

The efficacy of 5% topical TTO gel in mild to moderate acne vulgaris: A randomised, double-blind 

placebo-controlled study (Enshaieh et al. 2007). 

One study has been conducted on the possible efficacy of TTO in treatment of the acne vulgaris. It was 

a randomised double-blind clinical trial performed in 60 patients with mild to moderate acne vulgaris. 

They were randomly divided into two groups and were treated with TTO gel 5% (n=30) or placebo 

(n=30). They were followed every 15 days for a period of 45 days. Response to treatment was 

evaluated by the total acne lesions counting and acne severity index (ASI). The data was analysed 

statistically using t-test and by SPSS program. There was a significant difference between TTO gel and 

placebo in the improvement of the total acne lesions counting and also regarding improvement of the 

ASI. In terms of total acne lesions counting and ASI, TTO gel was 3.55 times and 5.75 times more 

effective than placebo respectively. Side-effects with both groups were relatively similar and tolerable. 

The authors concluded that topical 5% TTO is an effective treatment for mild to moderate acne 

vulgaris (Enshaieh et al. 2007). 

Assessor’s Comment: 5% TTO gel showed to ameliorate acne lesions in two studies.  

Feinblatt 1960 reported on the use of TTO for the treatment of furunculosis (boils). 35 patients (26 

males and 9 females) with furuncles located in various sites (18 in the neck, 8 on the back, 6 in the 

axilla areas, 1 on the scalp, 4 on the face and forehead, 4 on the forearm, 1 on the calf and 1 on the 

external ear) many of them at multiple sites were enrolled in the study. Ten patients were given 

expectant treatment and 25 were treated with TTO painting the surface over the furuncle freely with 

the oil two or three times daily, after thoroughly cleaning the site. Results showed that, of the 10 

untreated controls, five of the boils were finally incised and in five cases the infected site of the 

furuncle was still apparent after eight days. In the 25 cases treated with TTO, only one boil required 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 41/73 

 


 

incision and in 15 cases the infected site of the furuncle was removed completely in eight days. In six 

cases the infected site of the furuncle, while still present after eight days, was reduced more than one-

half and in three cases the infected site was reduced less than half in eight days. As to local reactions, 

three patients complained of slight temporary stinging. 

In the same paper Feinblatt (1960) described a typical case report of a male patient aged 40 under 

treatment for diabetes mellitus, who complained of recurrent boils. TTO was applied directly over a 

large boil (3 x 3 cm), swollen, reddened and painful boil on his neck two or three times daily after 

thorough cleansing. There was definite improvement within two days, most of the inflammation had 

disappeared after four days and the skin healed after eight days with no untoward effects or local 

reactions. The patient repeated the use of TTO whenever a new boil developed and every time the 

further boils development aborted. The Author concluded that, due to its high germicidal activity 

against Staphylococcus aureus and on the basis of rapid healing without scarring achieved in the 

study, TTO may be used as an alternative option before surgical intervention in furunculosis.  



Wound healing 

Uncontrolled, open-label, pilot study of TTO solution in the decolonisation of MRSA positive wounds and 

its influence on wound healing (Edmonson et al. 2011). 

The primary aim of an uncontrolled case series study was to assess whether a TTO solution used in a 

wound cleansing procedure could decolonise MRSA from acute and chronic wounds of mixed aetiology. 

The secondary aim was to determine if the TTO solution influenced wound healing outcomes. The 

product used was a water-miscible 10% v/v TTO solution. Nineteen participants with wounds 

suspected of being colonised with MRSA were enrolled in a pilot study. Seven were subsequently 

shown not to have MRSA and were withdrawn from the study. As many as 11 of the remaining 12 

participants were treated with a wash solution of 3.3% TTO manually shaken in water; the solution 

was applied as part of the wound cleansing regimen at each dressing change. Dressing changes were 

three times per week or daily as deemed necessary by the study nurse following assessment. One 

participant withdrew from the study before treatment. No participants were MRSA negative after 

treatment. After treatment had been implemented, 8 out of the 11 treated wounds had begun to heal 

and reduced in size as measured by computer planimetry. TTO did not appear to inhibit healing and 

the majority of wounds reduced in size after treatment. 

Two adverse events of pain were reported by participants who experienced pain during the cleansing 

procedure that may or may not have been because of the irrigation with the TTO solution (Edmonson 



et al. 2011). 

Assessor’s comment: this study shows that treatment with TTO can influence positively wound healing 

through its antimicrobial activity; limit of the study is the small number of participants.  

Protozoan infections 

A clinical investigation to determine the efficacy and safety of TTO use for vaginal douche and topical 

application in the treatment of trichomonal vaginitis, C. albicans vaginitis and other vaginal infections 

was performed. The medication studied was a special emulsified 40% solution of Australian TTO with 

isopropropyl alcohol 13%. Hundred thirty cases of vaginal infections were investigated: trichomonal 

vaginitis (n=96), C. albicans vaginitis (n=4), nulliparous cervicitis from Trichomonas vaginalis (n=20), 

chronic endocervicitis (n=10). Australian TTO was found to be highly effective in treatment of 

tricomonal vaginitis, C. albicans vaginitis, cervicitis and chronic endocervicitis (Peña 1962). 



Mycosis 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 42/73 

 


 

Onychomycosis is a superficial fungal infection that destroys the entire nail unit. It is the most 

frequent cause of nail disease, ranging from 2% to 13%. Standard treatments include debridement, 

topical medications, and systemic therapies. 

Comparison of two topical preparations for the treatment of onychomycosis: TTO and clotrimazole 

(Buck et al. 1994). 

A double-blind, multicenter, randomised controlled trial was performed at two primary care health and 

residency training centres and one private podiatrist's office to assess efficacy and tolerability of topical 

application of 1% clotrimazole solution compared with that of 100% TTO for the treatment of toenail 

onychomycosis. 

The participants included 117 patients with distal subungual onychomycosis proven by culture. Patients 

received twice-daily application of either 1% clotrimazole solution (n=53) or 100% TTO oil (n=64) for 

6 months. Debridement and clinical assessment were performed at 0, 1, 3, and 6 months. Cultures 

were obtained at 0 and 6 months. Each patient's subjective assessment was also obtained 3 months 

after the conclusion of therapy. Adverse reactions were erythema, irritation and oedema (7.8% in TTO 

and 5.7% in clotrimazole group), which cause the dropping out of four (3%) of the initial participants. 

The baseline characteristics of the treatment groups did not differ significantly. After 6 months of 

therapy, the two treatment groups were comparable based on culture cure (clotrimazole = 11%, TTO 

= 18%) and clinical assessment documenting partial or full resolution (clotrimazole = 61%, TTO = 

60%). Three months later, about one half of each group reported continued improvement or resolution 

(clotrimazole = 55%; TTO = 56%). 

Topical therapy, including the two preparations presented in this paper, provide improvement in nail 

appearance and symptomatology. The study shows that use of a topical preparation in conjunction 

with debridement is an appropriate initial treatment strategy (Buck et al. 1994). 

Assessor’s comment: the study shows efficacy of 100% TTO solution comparable to clotrimazole in the 

treatment of onychomycosis.  

Syed et al. 1999 conducted a double blind randomised controlled trial investigating the treatment of 

onychomycosis. 40 patients were randomly allocated to the Treatment group of 2% butenafine 

hydrochloride and 5% TTO and 20 patients were randomly allocated to the control group consisting of 

a TTO cream of unspecified concentration. After 16 weeks of topical application three times daily and 

covering with an occlusive plastic dressing, 80% in the treatment group were cured and no patients in 

the control group were cured. TTO in the control cream did not show the expected response and TTO 

was mixed with butenafine hydrochloride in the treatment group, it is difficult to determine whether 

the TTO produced any effect in this group. Treatment in the control group was discontinued after 8 

weeks so it is possible that the control treatment did not have sufficient time to render its full potency. 



Oropharyngeal candidiasis. Oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common opportunistic infection 

observed in the patients with HIV/AIDS.  

Efficacy of melaleuca oral solution for the treatment of fluconazole refractory oral candidiasis in AIDS 

patients (Jandourek et al. 1998, Vazquez & Zawawi 2002). 

Efficacy of melaleuca oral solution, an USA branded non-prescription commercial mouthwash

in AIDS 



patients with fluconazole-resistant oropharyngeal Candida infections was investigated in two studies. 

A prospective, single centre, open-labelled study was performed on thirteen patients with AIDS and 

oral candidiasis documented to be clinically refractory to fluconazole, as defined by failure to respond 

to a minimum of 14 days of > or = 400 mg fluconazole per day. Additionally, patients had in in vitro 

resistance to fluconazole, defined by minimal inhibitory concentrations of > or = 20 µg/ml. 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 43/73 

 


 

Patients were given 15 ml Melaleuca oral solution four times daily to swish and expel for 2-4 weeks. 

Resolution of clinical lesions of oral pseudomembranous candidiasis lesions evaluations were performed 

weekly for 4 weeks and at the end of therapy for clinical signs of oral candidiasis. Quantitative yeast 

cultures were performed at each evaluation. 

A total of 13 patients were entered into the study, 12 were evaluable. At the 2-week evaluation, 7 out 

of 12 patients had improved, none were cured, and 6 were unchanged. At the 4-week evaluation, 8 out 

of 12 patients showed a response (2 cured, 6 improved), 4 were non-responders, and 1 had 

deteriorated. A mycological response was seen in 7 out of 12 patients. A follow-up evaluation 2-4 

weeks after therapy was discontinued revealed that there were no clinical relapses in the 2 patients 

who were cured. 

The authors concluded that melaleuca oral solution appeared to be effective as an alternative regimen 

for AIDS patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis refractory to fluconazole (Jandourek et al. 1998).  

The efficacy of alcohol-based and alcohol-free USA branded non-prescription commercial mouthwashes 

containing TTO in patients with AIDS and fluconazole-refractory oropharyngeal candidiasis was 

investigated. 

The prospective, single-centre, open-label study was performed in a university-based inner city 

HIV/AIDS clinic. The study included 27 patients with AIDS and oral candidiasis clinically refractory to 

fluconazole. Patients were randomised 1:1 to receive either alcohol-based or alcohol-free TTO 

mouthwash four times daily for 2–4 weeks. Thirteen patients were enrolled into cohort called 1, and 

treated with 15 ml of an alcohol-based TTO mouthwash 4 times daily for 2 weeks; 14 patients were 

enrolled into cohort called 2 and treated with 5 ml of an alcohol-free TTO mouthwash 4 times daily for 

2 weeks. The different amount of mouthwash used in the two groups was due to need to use an 

equivalent quantity of TTO because the alcohol-based mouthwash was less concentrated than the non-

alcohol-based mouthwash. Additional 2 weeks of therapy were provided for patients who showed 

clinical improvement but who had not demonstrated a complete clinical response at the end of the 

initial 2 weeks. The main outcome measure was resolution of clinical lesions of oral candidiasis. 

Evaluations were performed at 2 and 4 weeks for clinical signs and symptoms of oral candidiasis and 

quantitative yeast cultures.  

All C. albicans isolates showed some degree of in in vitro resistance to fluconazole. Overall, using a 

modified intent-to-treat analysis, 60% of patients demonstrated a clinical response to the TTO 

mouthwash (7 patients cured and 8 patients clinically improved) at the 4-week evaluation.  

The authors concluded that both formulations of the TTO mouthwash appeared to be effective 

alternative regimens for patients with AIDS suffering from oropharyngeal candidiasis refractory to 

fluconazole (Vazquez & Zawawi 2002). 

Assessor’s comment: These studies show a positive effect of TTO commercial preparations in patients 

with AIDS affected by oropharyngeal candidiasis. No information on the concentration of TTO in the 

preparations used in the studies is available. Moreover the studies were conducted on a small number 

of patients. 

Denture stomatitis  

In vitro and in vivo activity of melaleuca alternifolia mixed with tissue conditioner on C. albicans 

(Catalan et al. 2008). 

Denture stomatitis is an inflammatory reaction of the palatal and alveolar mucosa underlying 

removable dental prostheses. Denture stomatitis is more commonly seen in the maxillary mucosa than 

in the mandibular mucosa. 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 44/73 

 


 

A study was performed to identify in vitro and in vivo activity of TTO mixed with different tissue 

conditioners on the C. albicans strain. Microbiological tests were used to isolate C. albicans from 

patients with denture stomatitis. The in vitro antifungal activity of TTO against C. albicans was 

determined when it was applied directly and when it was mixed with tissue conditioners (Fitt, Lynal, 

Coe-Comfort). For the in vivo activity the responses of 27 denture stomatitis patients divided in three 

arms (each of them with 9 patients) were evaluated over a period of 12 days: the control group 

received Coe-Comfort tissue conditioner, treatment group 1 received 1 ml TTO mixed with 4 ml Coe-

Comfort and treatment 2 group received 2 ml Nystatin mixed with 3 ml Coe-Comfort.  

In the in vitro study, Coe-Comfort or Fitt conditioners mixed with 1 ml, 20% (v/v) of TTO exhibited a 

total inhibition of C. albicans. Patients treated with TTO mixed with Coe-Comfort showed a significant 

decrease in palatal inflammation compared with those treated with Coe-Comfort (P = 0.001). In 

addition, a significant inhibition of C. albicans growth was observed with TTO mixed with Coe-Comfort 

compared with only Coe-Comfort (P = 0.000004). There was no difference between the treatment 

arms at day 12. The data did however suggest the decrease in C. albicans was faster with Treatment 1 

(TTO) than with Treatment 2 (Nystatin). Conclusions of authors were that TTO mixed with Coe-Comfort 

tissue conditioner is effective in treating denture stomatitis (Catalan et al. 2008). 

Assessor’s comment: This study has been conducted on a small number of patients, but suggests that 

TTO can be useful as an adjuvant in the care of denture stomatitis. 

Treatment of tinea pedis  

Satchell et al. 2002a and Tong et al. 1992 conducted randomised controlled trials and reported on the 

use of TTO for the treatment of tinea pedis.  

Treatment of interdigital tinea pedis with 25% and 50% TTO solution: A randomised, placebo-

controlled, blinded study (Satchell et al. 2002a). 

A randomised, controlled, double-blinded study to determine the efficacy and safety of 25% and 50% 

TTO in the treatment of interdigital tinea pedis was conducted. One hundred and fifty-eight patients 

with tinea pedis clinically and microscopy suggestive of a dermatophyte infection were randomised to 

receive either placebo, 25% or 50% TTO mixed in ethanol and polyethylene glycol solution. Patients 

applied the solution twice daily to affected areas for 4 weeks and were reviewed after 2 and 4 weeks of 

treatment. There was a marked clinical response seen in 68% of the 50% TTO group and 72% of the 

25% TTO group, compared to 39% in the placebo group. Mycological cure was assessed by culture of 

skin scrapings taken at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment. The mycological cure rate was 64% in 

the 50% TTO  group  and 55% in the 25%

 

TTO group, compared to 31% in the placebo group. Four 



(3.8%) patients applying TTO (one in the 25% group and three in the 50%) developed moderate to 

severe dermatitis that improved quickly on stopping the study medication (Satchell et al. 2002a). 



Assessor’s comment: This randomised, controlled, double-blinded study showing efficacy of 50% and 

25%  TTO  versus placebo in the treatment of interdigital tinea pedis.  The study indicates also the 

potential development of dermatitis during TTO treatment.  

TTO in the treatment of tinea pedis (Tong et al. 1992). 

One hundred and four patients completed a randomised, double-blind trial to evaluate the efficacy of 

10% w/w TTO cream compared with 1% tolnaftate and placebo creams in the treatment of tinea pedis. 

Significantly more tolnaftate-treated patients (85%) than TTO (30%) and placebo-treated patients 

(21%) showed conversion to negative culture at the end of therapy (p < 0.001); there was no 

statistically significant difference between TTO and placebo groups. All three groups demonstrated 

improvement in clinical condition based on the four clinical parameters of scaling, inflammation, itching 

and burning. The TTO group (24/37) and the tolnaftate group (19/33) showed significant improvement 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 45/73 

 


 

in clinical condition when compared to the placebo group (14/34; p = 0.022 and p = 0.018 

respectively). TTO cream (10% w/w) appears to reduce the symptomatology of tinea pedis as 

effectively as tolnaftate 1% but is no more effective than placebo in achieving a mycological cure 

(Tong et al. 1992).  

Assessor’s comment: This RCT shows efficacy of cream containing 10% TTO in improving symptoms of 

tinea pedis but without significant effects against the basic cause of pathology.  

Treatment of vaginal infections of C. albicans with TTO (Belaiche 1985a). 

A clinical study with TTO on 28 patients (average age 34), in full oestro-progestinic activity affected by 

vaginitis caused by C. albicans was carried outOne vaginal capsule weighting 2 g and containing 0.2 

grams of TTO was administered every night before sleeping for 90 days. Only one woman had felt 

vaginal burning at the end of the first week and she stopped the treatment. 23 out of 27 patients 

showed a complete cure with disappearance of burning and white discharge (leucorrhea). 4 of them 

had to continue the treatment due to the persistence of leucorrhea. Biological examinations showed 

the disappearance of C. albicans in 21 patients (Belaiche 1985a). 

Treatment of skin infections with TTO (Belaiche 1985b). 

A clinical study with TTO was conducted in 27 patients affected by different dermatological disorders 

with the following results: 

 

3 cases of intertrigo infected with C. albicans: application of pure TTO for 6 weeks - 2 months 



showed positive effects.  

 



4 cases of angular stomatitis infected with C. albicans and streptococci: twice a day application 

of TTO was successful in 3 out of 4 patients.  

 

2 cases of staphylococcal and streptococcal impetigo in children: twice a day application of TTO 



caused improvement in 10-15 hours. 

 



6 cases of staphylococcal acne: local treatment determined amelioration of the lesions, without 

a complete healing, acting on the infection and not on the sebaceous glands activity. 

 

11 cases of nail infections by C. albicans: treatment with pure TTO twice a day for 3 months, 



was successful in 8 patients with the first positive result in the first week; no significant 

improvement in 3 patients.  

 

1 case of pytiriasis versicolor [tinea versicolour caused by Malassezia  and/or  Trichophytum]: 



twice a day application of TTO controlled the event after 20 hours (Belaiche 1985b). 

Australian TTO: a natural antiseptic fungicidal agent (Shemesh & Mayo 1991) 

A clinical trial with Australian TTO was undertaken for the treatment of various dermatological 

disorders for six months in 50 patients. Several forms of TTO preparations were used: pure oil (100%), 

lozenges with 1% TTO plus 2.5 mg ground leaf; and a 5% cream. 50 patients were supplied TTO for a 

period of 1 to 4 weeks, depending on the severity of the condition being treated. All patients who 

completed treatment were either cured, all showed remarkable improvement in their presenting 

condition. One patient stopped the treatment after one day because of mild erythematous skin 

sensitivity to the 100% TTO (Shemesh & Mayo 1991). 

Recurrent herpes labialis 

Use of deception to achieve double-blinding in a clinical trial of TTO for the treatment of recurrent 

herpes labialis (Carson et al. 2008). 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 46/73 

 


 

In a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of TTO for the treatment of recurrent herpes labialis (RHL), or 

cold sores, deception was used to prevent volunteers from identifying their treatment allocation. 

Volunteers received placebo (n=102) or TTO (n=112) ointment in preparation for their next episode of 

RHL and were told, falsely, that the aroma of the ointments had been changed to prevent identification 

of the treatment group. At the trial's end, of the volunteers who had used their ointment and 

presented for treatment assessment (n=100), approximately 50% correctly guessed their treatment 

allocation (P=0.774). Amongst volunteers that had not presented for treatment assessment (n=114), 

12 volunteers did not provide blinding data and 46 did not open their tube. For the 56 volunteers who 

opened their tube, less than half of those receiving TTO (44.4%) and only a small proportion of those 

on placebo (17.2%) were able to correctly identify their treatment allocation. Among the volunteers 

that were not treated, the P-value was 0.083. This study showed that the ethical use of deception may 

provide effective blinding in challenging circumstances (Carson et al. 2008). 

Halitosis 

Antimicrobial activity of garlic, TTO, and chlorhexidine against oral microorganisms (Groppo et al. 

2002). 

Antimicrobial activities of TTO, garlic, and chlorhexidine solutions against oral microorganisms were 



compared in a five week study consisting of thirty subjects. The first week was considered baseline. All 

subjects used a control solution (second week), and were randomly divided into the three groups (third 

week): G1- 0.12% chlorhexidine in a vehicle solution; G2 - 2.5% solution of a garlic (Allium sativum 

L.) aqueous extract 1:1; and G3 - 0.2% TTO in vehicle solution and 0.5% Tween 80. Dishes containing 

blood agar and Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar (MSB) were inoculated with the subjects' saliva 

(collected twice a week). Total microorganisms and mutans streptococci were counted in blood agar 

and MSB, respectively.  

Chlorhexidine and garlic groups showed antimicrobial activity against mutans streptococci, but not 

against other oral microorganisms. The TTO group showed antimicrobial activity against mutans 

streptococci and other oral microorganisms. Maintenance of reduced levels of microorganisms was 

observed only for garlic and TTO during the two consecutive weeks (fourth and fifth). Unpleasant taste 

(chlorhexidine 40%, TTO 30%, garlic 100%), burning sensation (chlorhexidine 40%, TTO 60%, garlic 

100%), bad breath (chlorhexidine 40%, TTO 20%, garlic 90%), and nausea (chlorhexidine 0%, TTO 

10%, garlic 30%) were reported. The authors concluded that garlic and TTO might be an alternative to 

chlorhexidine (Groppo et al. 2002). 



Supragingival plaque 

Clinical and antibacterial effect of tea tree oil – a pilot study (Arweiler et al. 2000) 

Arweiler et al. 2000 reported the results from a pilot, non-randomised study on the effect of TTO on 

supragingival plaque formation and vitality. The study was performed with eight patients, which after 

professional tooth cleaning were asked to refrain any mechanical cleaning and to rinse the mouth with 

placebo (water) for 1 week, with chlorhexidine 0.1% (positive control) in a second and 0.34% TTO 

water solution with milk as emulsifier in a third test week. Every test week was followed by a 10-day 

washout in which normal tooth brushing with standard toothpaste was performed. The TTO reduced 

neither the plaque index nor the plaque area relative to the placebo although there was a reduction in 

the amount of vital bacteria compared to placebo. Chlorhexidine significantly reduced plaque area and 

vital bacteria compared to placebo and reduced plaque index. 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 47/73 

 


 

The effects of a tea tree oil-containing gel on plaque and chronic gingivitis (Soukoulis & Hirsch 2004) 

The use of TTO for oral conditions such severe gingivitis was studied in a double-blind, longitudinal, 

non-crossover trial with 49 medically fit non-smokers (24 males and 25 females) aged 18-60 years. 

Subjects were randomly assigned to three groups and given either 2.5% TTO-gel, 0.2% chlorhexidine 

gel, or a placebo gel to be applied with a toothbrush twice daily. Treatment effects were assessed 

using the Gingival Index (GI), Papillary Bleeding Index (PBI) and plaque staining score at four and 

eight weeks. The TTO group had significant reduction in PBI and GI scores. However, TTO did not 

reduce plaque scores, which tended to increase over the latter weeks of the study period. The Authors 

concluded that topical application of TTO gel to inflamed gingival tissue may be useful as an adjuvant 

of chemotherapeutic periodontal therapy.  

Minor skin lesions  

A randomised, controlled trial of TTO topical preparations versus a standard topical regimen for the 

clearance of MRSA colonisation (Dryden et al. 2004) 

Two topical MRSA eradication regimes were compared in hospital patients: a standard treatment 

included mupirocin 2% nasal ointment, chlorhexidine gluconate 4% soap, silver sulfadiazine 1% cream 

versus a TTO regimen. The TTO regimen comprised TTO 10% cream applied to the anterior nostrils 

three times a day for five days; TTO 5% body wash all over the body at least once a day for five days; 

TTO 10% cream to skin lesions, wounds and ulcers, and also to axillae or groins as an alternative to 

the body wash. One hundred and fourteen patients received standard treatment and 56 (49%) were 

cleared of MRSA carriage. One hundred and ten received TTO regimen and 46 (41%) were cleared. 

There was no significant difference between treatment regimens (Fisher’s exact test; P ¼ 0:0286). 

Mupirocin was significantly more effective at clearing nasal carriage (78%) than TTO cream (47%; P ¼ 

0:0001), but TTO treatment was more effective than chlorhexidine or silver sulfadiazine at clearing 

superficial skin sites and skin lesions. The TTO preparations were effective, safe and well tolerated and 

could be considered in regimens for eradication of MRSA carriage (Dryden et al. 2004).  

Assessor’s comment: this study shows the efficacy of a cream containing TTO 10% to clean skin 

lesions, wounds and ulcers.  

TTO as an alternative topical decolonisation agent for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 

(Caelli et al. 2000) 

Clearance of MRSA was also investigated by Caelli et al. 2000 who conducted a pilot randomised 

controlled trial on 30 hospital inpatients aged between 32 and 82 years. Fifteen patients were 

randomised to the TTO treatment group consisting of 4% TTO nasal ointment and 5% TTO body wash. 

Fifteen patients were randomised to the standard treatment group consisting of 2% mupirocin nasal 

ointment and triclosan body wash. The TTO treatment combination appeared to perform better than 

the standard treatment of mupirocin and triclosan although the difference was not statistically 

significant. 



Assessor’s comment: this is a pilot study with a too small number of patients.  

Dandruff 

Treatment of dandruff with 5% TTO shampoo (Satchell et al. 2002b). 

The efficacy and tolerability of 5% TTO on mild to moderate dandruff vs. placebo was investigated in a 

randomised, single-blind, parallel-group study. One hundred twenty-six male and female patients, 

aged 14 years and older, were randomly assigned to receive either 5% TTO shampoo or placebo, 

which was used daily for 4 weeks. The dandruff was scored on a quadrant-area-severity scale and by 

patient self-assessment scores of scaliness, itchiness, and greasiness. The 5% TTO shampoo group 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 48/73 

 


 

showed a 41% improvement in the quadrant-area-severity score compared with 11% in the placebo 

group (P < 0.001). Statistically significant improvements were also observed in the total area of 

involvement score, the total severity score, and the itchiness and greasiness components of the 

patients’ self-assessments. The scaliness component of patient self-assessment improved but was not 

statistically significant. There were no adverse effects. 5% TTO appears effective and well tolerated in 

the treatment of dandruff (Satchell et al. 2002b). 

Assessor’s comment: this study shows efficacy and good tolerability of a 5% TTO shampoo in the 

treatment of dandruff. 

Finally a case study describing a 5-day successful use of vaginal pessaries containing 200 mg of TTO in 

vegetable basis for the treatment of vaginal discharge typical of anaerobic vaginosis was reported by 

Blackwell 1991.  

Clinical Treatment of Ocular Demodecosis by Lid Scrub With Tea Tree Oil (Gao et al. 2007) 

Gao et al. 2007, following an in vitro observation that Demodex is resistant to a wide range of 

antiseptic solutions but susceptible to TTO in a dose-dependant manner, reported on the results of a 

retrospective review of an in vivo treatment with TTO of eleven patients with ocular Demodex. They 

found that Demodex count dropped to zero for two consecutive visits in less than four weeks in eight 

patients. Ten out of eleven patients showed different degrees of symptomatic relief and notable 

reduction of inflammatory signs. A significant visual improvement was noted in six out of twenty-two 

eyes which was associated with the development of a stable lipid tear film. The TTO lid scrub 

effectively eradicated ocular Demodex and resulted in subjective and objective improvements, which 

was interpreted a result in understanding , but caused notable irritation in 3 patients. Positive results 

were interpreted as preliminary results useful in understanding Demodex pathogenicity in causing 

several ocular surface diseases. Retrospective nature and the lack of using a standardized format to 

grade symptoms as well as randomisation with lid scrub using baby shampoo and small number of 

patients were recognised as a limitation of the value of this study (Gao et al. 2007).  

Finally the results of a case study were described by Millar & Moore 2008 where 100% TTO was used 

for the topical treatment of multiple warts, due to human papilloma virus, on the hand of a seven year 

old girl. Salicylic acid (12%) and lactic acid (4%) was previously used on this condition but only 

resulted in the temporary removal of the warts and they recurred in greater numbers. After five days 

treatment with undiluted TTO, all warts were reduced in size. After a further 7 days, there was no 

evidence of warts and complete reepithelialisation of the area. No recurrence has been reported. 

A summary of these studies is presented in Table 4. 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 49/73 

 

1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə