Oromucosal use or cutaneous use



Yüklə 0,61 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə7/7
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü0,61 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7
Participants  

Posology  

Interventions  

Outcomes  

Comments  

ml of control 

solution and 

standard dentifrice. 

Week 3: 1 min 

mouthwashes for 7 

days using 10 ml of 

one of the 

treatment solutions 

(G1, G2 and G3) 30 

mins after the last 

tooth brushing of 

the day. 

Week 4 and 5: 

treatment 

discontinued 

0.12% 

chlorhexidine in a 



vehicle solution; 

G2 - 2.5% solution 

of a garlic (Allium 

sativum L.) 

aqueous extract 

1:1; and G3 - 

0.2% TTO in 

vehicle solution 

and 0.5% Tween 

80. Receive either 

6% TTO in 

aqueous gel base 

or placebo gel  

organisms was observed only for garlic 

and TTO during the two consecutive 

weeks (4


th

 and 5


th

). Unpleasant taste 

(chlorhexidine 40%, TTO 30%, garlic 

100%), burning sensation 

(chlorhexidine 40%, TTO 60%, garlic 

100%), bad breath (chlorhexidine 

40%, TTO 20%, garlic 90%), and 

nausea (chlorhexidine 0%, TTO 10%, 

garlic 30%) were reported. 

Prevention of 

dental plaque 

growth  


Arweiler et 

al. 2000 

Three arm 

cross over 

study, 


non-

randomise

d  

8 subjects 23-34 years   Rinse twice daily for 



2 minutes with 

15ml of solution 

using no 

mechanical 

brushing warm 

water 


Week 1: water 

(placebo)  

Week 2: 0.1% 

Chlorhexidine 

(positive control)  

Week 3: 0.34% 

TTO dispersed in 

milk and diluted 

with water  

TTO reduced neither the plaque index 

nor the plaque area relative to the 

placebo, although reduction of vital 

bacteria compared to placebo.  

Chlorhexidine significantly reduced 

plaque area 

Adverse reactions: All subjects 

complained about intensive and 

unpleasant taste of TTO. Study may 

have dropped off particularly as in 3

rd

 



week patients had to mix the TTO 

solution themselves. 

No significant 

efficacy of TTO 

was detected 

on the amount 

of vital bacteria 

although there 

was a reduction 

compared to 

placebo. 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  



 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  

Page 57/73 

 


 

Indication  

Referenc

e  

Method  

Participants  

Posology  

Interventions  

Outcomes  

Comments  

Effect on 

plaque and 

chronic 


gingivitis  

Soukoulis 

& Hirsch 

2004  


3 arm, 

double-


blind, 

longitudin

al, non-

cross-over 

study. 

Gels 


randomly 

distributed  

58 subjects recruited 

with 49 subjects 

evaluated (24F/25M; 

18-60 years) with 

moderate to severe 

gingivitis, non-

smokers.  

For 8 weeks, gel 

applied along entire 

length of 

toothbrush and 

twice daily used as 

dentifrice in contact 

with gingival tissues 

adjacent to teeth 

for min of 2 mins. 

No rinsing, eating, 

drinking for 30 mins 

following gel 

application.  

Treatment: 2.5% 

TTO gel  

Positive control: 

0.2% 


chlorhexidine gel  

Negative control: 

Placebo gel  

TTO had significant reduction in 

Papillary Bleeding Index (PBI) and 

Gingival Index (GI) but did not reduce 

plaque scores which tended to increase 

towards end of study  

No adverse reactions  

 

Clearance of 



MRSA 

colonisation  

Dryden et 

al. 2004  

Randomis


ed 

controlled 

trial; 

Balanced 



randomisa

tion using 

software 

allocation  

236 colonised with 

MRSA (224 evaluable)  

Standard treatment: 

114 patients 

TTO treatment: 110 

patients  

Nasal application 3 

times per day for 5 

days;  

Body wash applied 



all over body at 

least once per day 

for 5 days;  

Application to skin 

lesions, wounds and 

ulcers once per day 

for 5 days  

Standard 

treatment: 

Mupirocin 2% to 

anterior nares; 

chlorhexidine 

gluconate 4% soap 

over body; silver 

sulfadiazine 1% 

cream to skin 

lesions, wounds, 

leg ulcers.  

TTO Treatment:  

10% TTO cream to 

anterior nares; 5% 

TTO body wash 

over body; 10% 

TTO cream to skin 

No significant difference between 

treatments for clearing MRSA.  

Mupirocin significantly more effective at 

clearing nasal carriage. TTO more 

effective at clearing superficial skin 

sites and skin lesions. 

TTO preparations were safe and well 

tolerated.  

 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  



 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  

Page 58/73 

 


 

Indication  

Referenc

e  

Method  

Participants  

Posology  

Interventions  

Outcomes  

Comments  

lesions, wounds, 

leg ulcers and as 

alternative to body 

wash for axillae, 

groins 


Clearance of 

colonised or 

infected 

MRSA  


Caelli et 

al. 2000  

Randomiz


ed, 

controlled 

pilot study  

30 hospital inpatients 

colonised or infected 

with MRSA (15 in each 

study arm; 32-82 

years for TTO group)  

Minimum three 

days treatment  

4% TTO nasal 

ointment + 5% 

TTO body wash vs.  

Standard 

treatment: 2% 

mupirocin nasal 

ointment + 

triclosan body 

wash  

TTO; 33% cleared, 20% chronic, 47% 



incomplete; for standard treatment 

13% cleared, 53% chronic, 33% 

incomplete (not significant)  

Adverse reactions: 

No adverse events. Mild swelling of 

nasal mucosa to acute burning reported 

for TTO nasal ointment (number not 

reported). One patient in standard 

treatment reported skin tightness 

Pilot study. 

Small number 

of patients 

Treatment of 

mild to 


moderate 

dandruff  

Satchell et 

al. 2002b  

RCT, 


investigat

or blinded  

126 patients with mild 

to moderate dandruff 

(> 14 yrs); 63 TTO 

group, 62 placebo 

group  

For 4 weeks, wash 



hair daily, leaving 

shampoo in for 3 

mins before rinsing  

5% TTO shampoo; 

placebo shampoo  

Whole scalp lesion score significantly 

improved in TTO group (41.2%) 

compared to placebo group (11.2%). 

Total area of involvement score, total 

severity score and itchiness and 

greasiness had statistically significant 

improvement in TTO group compared 

to placebo. 

 

Treatment of 



ocular 

Demodex  

Gao et al. 

2007  

Case 


series  

11 patients (6F/6M: 

60.2±11.6yrs) with 

ocular Demodex not 

using topical or 

systemic anti-

inflammatory and 

antibacterial 

Weekly lid scrub: 3 

times a cotton tip 

wetted in 50% TTO 

to scrub lash roots 

from one end to 

other as 1 stroke. 6 

strokes applied. Dry 

Weekly lid scrub: 

50% TTO diluted 

with mineral oil  

Daily lid scrub: 

0.5ml TTO 

shampoo mixed 

with tap water 



Demodex count dropped to zero for 2 

consecutive visits in less than 4 weeks 

in 8 patients. 10/11 patients showed 

different degrees of symptomatic relief 

and notable reduction of inflammatory 

signs. Significant visual improvement in 

6 of 22 eyes was associated with stable 

Small number 

of patients 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  



 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  

Page 59/73 

 


 

Indication  

Referenc

e  

Method  

Participants  

Posology  

Interventions  

Outcomes  

Comments  

medications before 

TTO scrub.  

cotton tip used to 

remove excess 5 

mins later. 

Reapplication after 

5 mins.  

Daily lid scrub: 

With eyes closed, 

lids massaged with 

TTO shampoo and 

water for 3-5 

minutes, medium 

pressure then 

rinsed with water. 

Twice daily for 1 

month, then once 

daily.  

(Kato Sales, 

Florida).  

lipid tear film  

 

Adverse reactions: The weekly office lid 



scrub with 50% TTO resulted in mild 

irritation in 6 patients and moderate 

irritation in 3 patients. Patients’ 

symptoms were relieved, ocular surface 

inflammation resolved and lipid tears 

film stability improved. 

Treatment of 

various 


gynaecologica

l conditions  

Peña  

1962 


Open, 

uncontroll

ed 

96 trichomonal 



vaginitis,  

C. albicans vaginitis,  

20 nulliparous 

cervicitis from 



Trichomonas vaginalis,  

10 chronic 

endocervicitis  

vaginal canal 

washed for 30 sec 

then tampon left in 

place for 24 hours – 

weekly treatment 

Treatment: TTO  

40% in solution 

Cured and healed cervicitis in 10 

patients after 4 weekly treatments 

Effective concentration found to be 

20% solution of TTO 

Adverse reactions: No irritation, mild 

drying effect.  

 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  



 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  

Page 60/73 

 


 

Indication  

Referenc

e  

Method  

Participants  

Posology  

Interventions  

Outcomes  

Comments  

Treatment of 

vaginal 

discharge 

typical of 

anaerobic 

vaginosis  

Blackwell 

1991 2

1

  



Case 

study  


40 year old woman  

5 day application in 

form of TTO vaginal 

pessaries  

Vaginal pessary 

containing TTO  

in a vegetable oil 

base 


Vaginal secretions normal  

 

 



Vaginal 

infections 

associated 

with C. 



albicans 

Belaiche 

1985a 

Open, 


non-

controlled 

 

90 days daily 



application in form 

of a TTO vaginal 

capsule every night 

before sleeping;  

Vaginal capsule 

containing TTO 0.2 

g  

23 out of 27 patients showed a 

complete cure. Remaining patients had 

moderate improvement of discharge. C. 



albicans disappeared in 21 patients 

4 of them had to continue the 

treatment due to the persistence of 

leucorrhea. Biological examinations 

showed the disappearance of C. 

albicans in 21 patients 

Adverse reactions:  

One out of 28 patients experienced 

vaginal burning sensation and withdrew 

from study. 

 

Treatment of 



warts on 

finger  


Millar & 

Moore 


2008  

Case 


study  

Seven yr old girl  

TTO applied with 

sterile cotton wool 

swabs to each 

lesion, each 

evening after 

bathing and prior to 

sleep.  

100% TTO.  

Previously used 

salicylic acid 

(12%w/w) and 

lactic acid (4% 

w/w) resulting in 

temporary removal 

of warts but they 

recurred in greater 

numbers  

After 5 days, all warts reduced in size. 

After a further 7 days, no evidence of 

warts and complete re-epithelialisation. 

No recurrence to date.  

 

1



 

Not peer reviewed 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  



 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  

Page 61/73 

 

                                                



 

TTO – Tea Tree Oil  

RCT – Randomised Controlled Trial  

F – female  

M – male 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  



 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  

Page 62/73 

 


 

Clinical studies conducted with combinations containing TTO: 

Mycosis 

Treatment of toenail onychomycosis with 2% butenafine and 5% TTO in cream 

The objective of a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to examine the clinical 

efficacy and tolerability of 2% butenafine hydrochloride and 5% TTO incorporated in a cream to 

manage toenail onychomycosis in a cohort. Sixty outpatients (39 M, 21 F) aged 18–80 years (mean 

29.6) with 6–36 months duration of disease were randomised to two groups (40 and 20), active and 

placebo. Patients were shown how to apply the trial medication at home three times a day topically for 

7 days. After 16 weeks, 80% of patients using medicated cream were cured, as opposed to none in the 

placebo group. Four patients in the active treatment group experienced subjective mild inflammation 

without discontinuing treatment. During follow-up, no relapse occurred in cured patients and no 

improvement was seen in medication-resistant and placebo participants (Syed et al. 1999).  

Assessor’s comment: this is randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study showing efficacy of a 

combination of TTO (5%) with 2% butenafine hydrochloride incorporated in a cream in management of 

toenail onychomycosis. 

Halitosis 

Reduction of Mouth Malodour and Volatile Sulphur Compounds in Intensive Care Patients using an 

Essential Oil Mouthwash 

A study was carried out to explore the effect of an essential oil solution on levels of malodour and 

production of volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) in patients nursed in intensive care unit. Thirty two 

patients received 3 min of oral cleaning using an essential oil solution (mixture of TTO, peppermint, 



Mentha piperita and lemon, Citrus limon) on the first day, and benzydamine hydrochloride on the 

second day. Two trained nurses measured the level of malodour with a 10 cm visual analogue scale 

(VAS) and VSC with a Halimeter before (Pre), 5 min after (Post I) and 1 h following treatment (Post 

II). The level of oral malodour was significantly different following the essential oil session, and differed 

significantly between two sessions at Post I (p < 0.005) and Post II ( p < 0.001). Differences between 

the two sessions were significant (benzydamine hydrochloride, p < 0.001; essential oil, p < 0.001) in 

the level of VSC and significantly lower in the essential oil session than benzydamine hydrochloride at 

the Post II (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that mouth care using an essential oil mixture of diluted 

TTO, peppermint and lemon may be an effective method to reduce malodour and VSC in intensive care 

unit patients (Hur et al. 2007). 



Assessor’s comment: These studies suggests that TTO, alone or in combination, probably due to its 

antimicrobial activity against oral microorganisms, can be useful to fight halitosis.  

A Clinical Study: Melaleuca, Manuka, Calendula and Green Tea Mouth Rinse 

A mouthwash (IND 61,164) containing essential oils and extracts from four plant species (Melaleuca 

alternifoliaLeptospermum scopariumCalendula officinalis and Camellia sinensis) was tested. The 

study aimed to evaluate the safety, palatability and preliminary efficacy of the rinse. Fifteen subjects 

completed the Phase I safety study. Seventeen subjects completed the Phase II randomised placebo-

controlled study. Plaque was collected, gingival and plaque indices were recorded (baseline, 6 weeks, 

and 12 weeks). The relative abundance of two periodontal pathogens (Actinobacillus 

actinomycetemcomitansTanerella forsythensis) was determined utilizing digoxigenin-labelled DNA 

probes. ANCOVA was used at the p = 0.05 level of significance. Two subjects reported a minor adverse 

event. One subject withdrew from the study. Several subjects objected to the taste of the test rinse 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 63/73 

 


 

but continued treatment. Differences between gingival index, plaque index or relative abundance of 

either bacterial species did not reach statistical significance when comparing nine placebo subjects with 

eight test rinse subjects. Subjects exposed to the test rinse experienced no abnormal oral lesions

altered vital signs, changes in liver, kidney, or bone marrow function. The authors concluded that 

larger scale studies would be necessary to determine the efficacy and oral health benefits of the test 

rinse (Lauten et al. 2005). 

Assessor’s comment: a preliminary study on a small number of patients showing positive effects of 

mouth rinse containing TTO in combination with Manuka, Calendula and Green Tea. 

Pediculoris 

An ex vivo, assessor blind, randomised, parallel group, comparative efficacy trial of the ovicidal activity 

of three pediculicides after a single application - TTO and lavender oil, eucalyptus oil and lemon TTO, 

and a “suffocation” pediculicide 

Components to the clinical efficacy of pediculicides are: (i) efficacy against the crawling stages 

(lousicidal efficacy); and (ii) efficacy against the eggs (ovicidal efficacy). Lousicidal efficacy and ovicidal 

efficacy are confounded in clinical trials. A trial was specially designed to rank the clinical ovicidal 

efficacy of pediculicides. Eggs were collected, pre-treatment and post-treatment, from subjects with 

different types of hair, different coloured hair and hair of different length. 

Subjects with at least 20 live eggs of Pediculus capitis (head lice) were randomised to one of three 

treatment-groups: a TTO and lavender oil pediculicide (TTO/LO); an eucalyptus oil and lemon TTO 

pediculicide (EO/LTTO); or a “suffocation” pediculicide. Pre-treatment: 10 to 22 live eggs were taken 

from the head by cutting the single hair with the live egg attached, before the treatment (total of 

1,062 eggs). Treatment: The subjects then received a single treatment of one of the three 

pediculicides, according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Post-treatment: 10 to 41 treated live eggs 

were taken from the head by cutting the single hair with the egg attached (total of 1,183 eggs). Eggs 

were incubated for 14 days. The proportion of eggs that had hatched after 14 days in the pre-

treatment group was compared with the proportion of eggs that hatched in the post-treatment group. 

The primary outcome measure was % ovicidal efficacy for each of the three pediculicides. 

Seven hundred twenty two subjects were examined for the presence of eggs of head lice. Ninety two of 

these subjects were recruited and randomly assigned to: the “suffocation” pediculicide (n = 31); the 

TTO/LO (n = 31); and the EO/LTTO (n = 30 subjects). The group treated with EO/LTTO had an ovicidal 

efficacy of 3.3% (SD 16%) whereas the group treated with TTO/LO had an ovicidal efficacy of 44.4% 

(SD 23%) and the group treated with the “suffocation” pediculicide had an ovicidal efficacy of 68.3% 

(SD 38%). 

Ovicidal efficacy varied substantially among treatments, from 3.3% to 68.3%. The “suffocation” 

pediculicide (68.3% efficacy against eggs) and the TTO/LO (44.4% efficacy against eggs) were 

significantly more ovicidal than EO/LTTO (3.3%) (P < 0.0001). The “suffocation” pediculicide and 

TTO/LO are also highly efficacious against the crawling-stages. Thus, the “suffocation” pediculicide and 

TTO/LO should be recommended as first line treatments (Barker & Altman 2011). 



Assessor’s comment: this study shows the efficacy of a combination of TTO with lavender oil as 

pediculicide. 

4.2.3. 

 

Clinical studies in special populations (e.g. elderly and children) 

No significant study has been performed in special populations 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 64/73 

 


 

4.3. 

 

Overall conclusions on clinical pharmacology and efficacy 

TTO has been widely investigated in several clinical studies, which showed its efficacy as an antiseptic 

in various conditions.  

Two RCT conducted in different countries support the ability of a 5% TTO gel to ameliorate lesions in 

the treatment of mild to moderate acne vulgaris (Enshaieh et al. 2007, Bassett et al. 1990). Another 

study conducted by Feinblatt (1960) is insufficient to show the efficacy of 100% TTO for the treatment 

of furunculosis (boils) despite the positive findings. 

Clinical trials support the efficacy versus placebo of 50% and 25% TTO solutions in the treatment of 

interdigital tinea pedis (Satchell et al. 2002a) and the traditional use of a cream containing 10% TTO 

to improve symptoms of tinea pedis, but with no significant effects against the basic cause of the 

pathology (Tong et al. 1992).  

A RCT showed that 100% TTO has an effect comparable to that of clotrimazole for the treatment of 

onychomycosis (Buck et al. 1994). Another RCT (Syed et al. 1999) did not show effects of TTO in 

onychomycosis, but information are lacking on the TTO concentration of the cream used in the study.  

The use of TTO for the reduction of yeast and fungal infections was studied in various clinical trials 

conducted by different investigators, but in some studies information on the TTO content of the 

preparation used is not provided (Jandourek et al. 1998, Vazquez & Zawawi 2002) and in the other 

studies the number of patients or the study design cannot be considered supportive for the well-

established use (Catalan et al. 2008, Belaiche 1985a, Belaiche 1985b). 

Two RCT (Dryden 2004, Caelli et al. 2000) and one open controlled pilot study (Enshaieh et al. 2007, 

Bassett et al. 1990) conducted by different investigators showed that different concentrations (3.3-

10%) of TTO may influence positively wound healing through its antimicrobial activity and clearance of 

MRSA. 

Clinical studies for the relief of the symptoms associated with a variety of oral cavity diseases or for 



the prevention of dental plaque growth support the use and antimicrobial activity of various TTO 

preparations (TTO commercial oral solutions, 6% TTO in aqueous gel, 0.34% TTO dispersed in milk 

and diluted with water, 2.5% TTO gel) but they were performed in a too small number of patients or 

showed no significant results (Jandourek et al. 1998, Vazquez & Zawawi 2002, Catalan et al. 2008, 

Groppo et al. 2002, Arweiler et al. 2000, Soukoulis & Hirsch 2004). 

The clinical study on the use of TTO for the treatment of ocular Demodex (Gao et al. 2007) provide an 

interesting hypotesis for further investigation. 

Clinical investigations on the use in vaginitis, cervicitis and endocervicitis gives only a very low level of 

evidence, insufficient to support the use of any formulation tested (Peña 1962, Blackwell 1991, 

Belaiche 1985a). 



5. 

 

Clinical Safety/Pharmacovigilance 

5.1. 

 

Overview of toxicological/safety data from clinical trials in humans 

Most of the clinical studies in which skin irritations and allergies were demonstrated utilized 1% TTO 

preparations thus indicating that commonly used topical concentrations are likely to elicit allergic 

responses in susceptible individuals. Because of demonstrated systemic toxic effects, TTO should never 

be used internally. In 2005, Nielsen reviewed the reported toxicity of TTO and its major components 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 65/73 

 


 

and derived an estimated NOAEL for whole TTO of 330 mg/kg b.w. based on component data with a 

worst case scenario of 117 mg/kg b.w. (Nielsen 2005).  

Skin Irritation  

In a recent review, Hammer et al. (2006) reported the results of a number of publications on human 

patch testing with TTO. The results of these studies are summarised in the Table 5. Undiluted TTO has 

been reported to cause skin irritation in a small proportion of subjects (generally <5%). The irritation 

potential of TTO may be related to the age of the oil, with aged oils (presumably containing higher 

levels of peroxides and degradation products such as ascaridol) displaying a greater incidence of 

irritation.  

Table 5: Skin irritation potential of TTO in humans  

Test substance  

No of subjects   Results  

Study  

Ten different samples of 

undiluted TTO applied under 

occlusive conditions for 48 

hours.  

219  


The prevalence of marked irritancy to 

100% TTO ranged from 2.4% to 4.3%. 

Any level of irritancy (mild and marked) 

ranged from 7.2 to 10.1%.  

Greig et al. 1999  

Undiluted TTO and 25% TTO in 

cream, 25% TTO in ointment, 

25% TTO in gel, 5% TTO in 

cream and 5% TTO + 5% 

synergist in cream. Applied 

under occlusive conditions for 

48 hours.  

311  

Subjects were treated daily for a three 



week period during the induction phase 

of a sensitisation study. Mean irritancy 

score of 0.25 for undiluted TTO. The 

incidence of irritation with undiluted TTO 

was 5.5%. Formulations containing 25% 

or lower of TTO were non-irritating.  

Altman 1991 

Aspres & Freeman 

2003  

TTO at 10% (in pet.) and 5% 



in a commercial lotion and 4 

other formulations. Applied 

under occlusive conditions for 

48 hours.  

217  

10% TTO (in pet.) did not cause 



irritation. The 5% lotion caused irritation 

in 44 subjects (20%). The 4 formulations 

tested on 160 subjects caused 5 weak 

reactions (3.1%). All test samples 

contained the same source of TTO. The 

other components in the formulation 

influence the incidence and severity of 

irritation.  

Veien et al. 2004 

 

Sensitisation  

Greig et al. (2002) investigated the allergic reaction threshold using occluded patch testing in eight 

subjects previously confirmed to be sensitised to TTO. The reaction threshold concentrations for TTO 

were highly variable and were found to occur at 0.5% in one subject, while still being somewhat 

doubtful at 10% in one other subject. The lowest concentration able to induce a level 1-3 response in 

the other volunteers fell between these: 1% (one person), 2% (three people) and 5% (two people). In 

the same subjects, 11 individual components of TTO were also tested. The TTO components that 

caused reactions in pre-sensitised individuals were p-cymene, terpinolene, α-terpinene and γ-

terpinene. The authors commented that they had concerns that the oil samples may have become 

oxidised within the duration of the study.  



Elicitation 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 66/73 

 


 

The elicitation studies generally demonstrate that the threshold for elicitation of allergic reactions in 

subjects sensitised to tea tree are >2% in the majority of sensitised subjects. Friedman & Moss (1985) 

suggested that when induction conditions are severe then the elicitation threshold is low. When 

induction occurs under mild conditions (as is the case with TTO) much higher exposures are required 

to elicit an allergic reaction and allergic reaction may not occur as long as exposure remains low.  



Induction  

A test on human volunteers using a low dose but highly maximized conditions failed to produce 

sensitisation reactions. A Kligman Human Maximization test was conducted on 1% TTO in petrolatum 

in 22 healthy male and female volunteers. The test material was applied under occlusion to the same 

site on the volar forearm of all subjects for 5 alternate-day 48-hour periods. The patch site was pre-

treated for 24 hours with 5% aqueous SLS under occlusion for the initial patch only. Following a 10-14 

day rest period, a challenge patch of the test material was applied to a fresh site for a 48-hour period 

under occlusion. Prior to challenge, 5% SLS was applied to the test site for 30 minutes under occlusion 

on the left side of the back whereas the test materials were applied without SLS treatment on the right 

side. A fifth site challenged with petrolatum served as a control (RIFM 1802). 



Clinical Diagnostic Studies 

Two cases of contact dermatitis associated with the application of TTO have been reported by Apted et 



al. (1991). The use of a vehicle and other aspects of the patch testing were not discussed however, 

positive patch tests were apparently obtained.  

A TTO hand-wash was provided for staff in the intensive care unit of a major hospital. A 45-year-old 

nurse developed raised red lesions at sites of contact within 5 min of application. This reaction 

occurred on 3 separate occasions, the lesions persisting for at least 36 h. Previously, she had regularly 

used a shampoo containing TTO at home without adverse effects. Patch testing was performed (using 

IQ chambers) on 3 separate occasions over several months, firstly on the outer upper arm and then on 

the upper back. There was no response to 10 different samples of 10% TTO tested at 10%. When the 

TTO used in the manufacture of the handwash was tested at the concentration in the product (3%) 

there was no reaction. When tested at 100% however, the 10 samples of TTO produced reactions on 2 

occasions. Mild erythema and pruritus also occurred with 6 of the 10 oils on 1 occasion and with 4 on 

the other. On the 2nd occasion, one oil caused erythema and oedema. She also gave vesicular 

responses to 3 metals (potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, and nickel sulfate) (Greig et al. 1999).  

Two professional aroma therapists with suspected allergic contact dermatitis after having handled a 

variety of essential oils in the course of their work were patch tested with a total of 60 and 22 oils, 

respectively. Occluded patches with the oils including TTO at 2% diluted in white petrolatum, were 

applied for 48 hours. In one of these patients a positive (+++) reaction was observed to this oil. It is 

not clear how many other oils produced positive reactions in this patient (Dharmagunawardena et al. 

2002).  

A 46-yr-old man applied pure TTO to a superficial abrasion on his left leg. Within a few days, the 

treated area became red and itchy. Applications of TTO were stopped, but the eruption became 

generalized, with urticarial plaques and atypical targets. A skin biopsy from a target-like lesion showed 

a spongiotic dermatitis. The patient then developed dermatitis under an Elastoplast® dressing used on 

the biopsy site. The lesions cleared with oral prednisone. Five months later, patch tests were done with 

the North American standard series and with TTO, hydroabietyl alcohol, abietic acid and turpentine 

peroxides. The patient was also tested to a drop of his own, old TTO. At day 4, the patient reacted to 

both TTO samples, with a stronger reaction to his own than to the fresh preparation. Positive reactions 

to colophony, hydroabietyl alcohol and Balsam of Peru were also noted (Khanna et al. 2000).  

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 67/73 

 


 

Open and closed tests on TTO at different concentrations in water were conducted on a 74-year-old 

man after the occurrence of blistering dermatitis from the use of a TTO containing wart paint. The 

patient reacted to a concentration of 1% at the closed site and at 100% at the open site. No effects 

were seen in 50 controls at 1% or 5% (Bhushan & Beck 1997).  

A 64 year old woman with severe eczema of the ears, neck and upper chest following the use of 

Earex® ear drops was patch tested with the Euopean standard, preservatives, cosmetics and the 

hairdressing series as well as her own products including Earex® ear drops which was positive. Further 

testing to the ingredients of Earex drops was conducted including 5% TTO to which she reacted. No 

further details provided (Stevenson & Finch 2003).  

Tests were conducted on a 33-year-old woman after the occurrence of dermatitis from the use of 

undiluted TTO. Finn chambers and Scanpor tape were used. Reactions were assessed day 3. A positive 

reaction was observed (Selvaag et al. 1994).  

In a study on the frequency of sensitisation to TTO in consecutive patients, patch tests were conducted 

in 10 dermatological departments. TTO gave positive reactions in 16/794 patients when tested at 5% 

in diethylphthalate. Of these 16 reacting patients, 12/16 pts had used TTO in the past, mainly as a 

treatment for herpes simplex, eczema and onychomycosis. 4/16 subjects denied any contact to TTO. 

7/16 subjects also showed a positive patch test to oil of turpentine at 10% in petrolatum (Treudler R, 



et al. 2000).  

A crystalline compound was isolated from oxidized TTO identified as 1,2,4-trihydroxymenthane by 

mass spectroscopy. Fifteen patients sensitive to TTO were tested epicutaneously with seven typical 

constituents of and two degradation products of TTO. Positive effects, 1,2,4-trihydroxymenthane was 

shown to be an important allergen as well as ascaridol, another degradation product of TTO. Besides 

1,2,4-trihydroxymenthane and ascaridol, alpha-phellandrene, alpha-terpinene, and terpinolene were 

found to give positive reactions as well. The authors noted that TTO kept under practical daily 

conditions undergoes photo-oxidation within a short time, leading to the formation of peroxides and 

subsequently to the generation of degradation products. Compounds like ascaridol and 1,2,4-

trihydroxymenthane are formed. These degradation products are moderate to strong sensitisers and 

must be considered responsible for the induction of contact allergy developing in individuals having 

treated themselves with TTO (Harkenthal et al. 2000).  

Seven male and female patients who had become sensitised to TTO were examined during a 3-year 

period in an outpatient dermatology clinic. They had been treating pre-existing skin conditions, which 

included foot fungus, dog scratches, "pimples" of the legs, insect bites and hand rashes. All patients 

initially had an eczematous dermatitis consisting of ill-defined plaques of erythema, oedema and 

scaling. In 3 patients vesciculation was also present. The patients were patch tested on their upper 

backs with Finn Chambers to a 1% solution TTO and solutions of 11 constituent compounds. The 

application time was 48 hours. Reactions were assessed at 50 hours. Control patches of ethanol, olive 

oil and a blank Finn Chamber were also applied. A total of 20 control patients with unrelated 

dermatoses were patch tested to the 1% TTO solution and 10 control patients were patch tested to 

solutions of 11 constituent compounds. 7 control patients were patch tested to the higher 

concentrations of the constituent compounds. The patch test vehicle was ethyl alcohol in all cases. All 

seven patients reacted to TTO at 1%. No effects were seen in 20 control subjects. Positive reactions 

were also seen with d-limonene, α-terpinene, aromadendrene, terpinen-4-ol, α-phellandrene, p-

cymene, α-pinene and terpinolene (Knight & Hausen 1994).  



Human Patch Tests  

There are several human patch test studies with TTO reported in the literature. These have been 

summarised in Table 12. In total, patch tests have identified 151 subjects with positive reactions to 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 68/73 

 


 

TTO among 9367 subjects. The rate of allergic reactions varies from one study to another and is 

between 0.6% and 2.4% (mean 1.6%). The incidence and strength of the reactions was generally 

higher with oxidised TTO samples. Rutherford et al. (2007) concluded that oxidised TTO has a 

sensitising capacity three times stronger than fresh TTO. This is consistent with the finding of Hausen 

(Hausen et al 1999, Hausen 2004) and the relatively high rate of positive reactions observed in patch 

testing of a deliberately oxidised TTO sample (Coutts et al. 2002).  

Nielsen (2005) concluded that the prevalence of positive findings following exposure of pre-sensitised 

dermatological patients in the clinical studies to TTO is generally around 0.4%-0.6% (Hammer et al. 

2006). Thus, TTO has only a weak sensitising potential among pre-sensitised people, though the 

present known number may be an overestimate due to problems with aged TTO (unknown peroxide 

levels) and selection bias in some clinical studies.  

While patch testing remains a useful diagnostic tool used by Dermatologists, it has some well 

recognised limitations. In most studies the researchers neglect to demonstrate clinical relevance of any 

positive patch testing results (Lachapelle 1997). Rutherford et al. (2007) observed positive patch tests 

with TTO in 41 out of 2320 patients. However when the patients were questioned regarding prior 

exposure to TTO products, only 17 out of 41 reactions were of possible clinical relevance, but none 

could be demonstrated to have probable or definite relevance. In other words, out of the 41 patients 

giving a positive patch test to TTO, 24 subjects had no identified prior exposure to TTO.  

False positives in the patch tests are not uncommon. False positives can occur as a result of irritancy 

rather than a true allergic response, particularly as TTO can cause skin irritation both in animals 

(Beckmann & Ippen 1998) and humans (Aspres & Freeman 2003). Similarly, false positives may result 

from cross-reactions where patients react to a substance which is not the substance which initially 

induced the allergic state. TTO is an essential oil with components that are also found in other natural 

substances. The phenomenon of “excited skin syndrome” has also been suggested to contribute to 

false positives (Maibach In Ring & Burg 1981). This phenomenon occurs when a subject shows multiple 

positive patch tests which cannot be reproduced when the subject is retested. 

It should also be noted that many of the Dermatological units obtain their samples of TTO from 

Chemotechnique Diagnostics3. Chemotechnique Diagnostics have confirmed that their oil has been 

deliberately oxidised. 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 69/73 

 


 

Table 12: Summary of human patch test studies  

Test substance  

Number of subjects   Results  

Study  

Products containing TTO 

were tested concentrated 

or diluted  

1216  

Seven patients (0.6%) with an 



allergic contact dermatitis due to 

TTO were identified. Two of them 

also exhibited delayed type IV 

hypersensitivity towards 

fragrance-mix or colophony  

Fritz et al. 2001  

TTO formulations ranging 

from 5 to 100%  

28  

21-day RIPT resulted in 3 



subjects (11%) showing allergic 

reactions to mixtures containing 

oxidised oils  

Southwell et al. 1997 

Undiluted TTO and 25% 

TTO in cream, 25% TTO in 

ointment, 25% TTO in gel, 

5% TTO in cream and 5% 

TTO + 5% synergist in 

cream  


311  

Three (1%) subjects were 

sensitised to TTO.  

Aspres & Freeman 2003  

Ten different samples of 

undiluted TTO.  

219  

Five subjects (2.3%) exhibited 



confirmed sensitisation reactions.  

Greig et al. 1999 

Undiluted TTO, and 5%, 

1% and 0.1% of TTO in 

petrolatum  

Stabilised by 

microencapsulation  

725  


Six subjects (0.8%) gave a 

definite reaction with undiluted 

TTO. Another 37 subjects 

presented equivocal to minimal 

reactions. Serial dilutions were 

positive until 1% concentration 

(one subject). There were no 

reactions at 0.1% concentration. 

The authors concluded that the 

sensitisation potential to TTO was 

“poor”.  

Lisi et al. 2000  

Undiluted TTO which was 

deliberately oxidised  

550  

Thirteen (2.4%) subjects with 4 



considered of relevance and 5 

with possible relevance.  

Coutts et al. 2002 

(Abstract only)  

 

TTO may be regarded as only a weak allergen, where it has any sensitising potential. Thus, normal in-



use exposure may induce a sub-clinical allergic state which will not be elicited under normal exposure 

conditions but may become apparent only under occlusive patch test conditions. This is supported by 

the absence of any clearly documented epidemic of consumer complaints associated with TTO 

containing cosmetic products. This hypothesis has been proposed to explain some of the allergic 

responses seen in clinical studies for some fragrance ingredients (Hostynek & Maibach 2004). 

Furthermore, the relatively high volatility of TTO and the low dermal penetration may also explain the 

difference in the result obtained with diagnostic patch testing, where the dermal penetration is 

expected to be increased due to occlusion, and the lack of consumer complaints as demonstrated by 

company data. 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 70/73 

 


 

5.2. 

 

Patient exposure 

No data available. 



5.3. 

 

Adverse events and serious adverse events and deaths 

Allergic reactions 

Very rarely allergic dermatitis may occur during the use of the essential oil without any dilution. 

Allergic skin reactions reported in Denmark are not common (≥1/1.000 and < 1/100).  

At the Skin and Cancer Foundation (Sydney, NSW, Australia), three of 28 normal volunteers tested 

strongly positive to patch testing with TTO. Following further patch testing with TTO constituents, all 

three patients reacted strongly to two preparations containing sesquiterpenoid fractions of the oil 

(Rubel et al. 1998).  

Acute intoxications 

Several cases of human TTO poisoning have been reported, mostly involving the ingestion of modest 

volumes (N 10-25 ml) of oil. In two cases, ingestion of TTO resulted in what appeared to be systemic 

contact dermatitis (Carson & Riley 1998). 

It has been reported the case of a patient comatose for the first 12 h and then semi-conscious for the 

following 36 h after ingestion of approximately half a cup of TTO. Other cases reported that two 

children who ingested less than 10 ml TTO became ataxic and drowsy or disorientated. Both were 

treated supportively and recovered fully without further complications (Carson & Riley 1998). 

Ingestion of significant quantities of TTO has been described in a 17-month-old male who ingested less 

than 10 ml of the pure oil (100%) and developed ataxia and drowsiness (Halcon & Milkus 2004). 

Accidental poisonings following TTO ingestion, demonstrate that at relatively high doses, TTO causes 

Central Nervous System depression and muscle weakness (Jacobs & Hornfeldt 1994, Del Beccaro 

1995, Morris et al. 2003, Elliott 1993, Villar et al. 1994, Seawright 1993). However, these symptoms 

had generally resolved within 36 hours. 



Cutaneous and mucosal reactions 

Adverse skin reactions like smarting pain, itch, and allergic reactions have been reported. The 

frequency is not known (Sweden). Burn-like skin reaction has been reported in Denmark. The 

frequency is rare (<1/1.000).  

There have been case reports of dermal sensitivity, contact dermatitis related to TTO. Varma et al

reported a case of vaginal application of TTO and lavender oil in a patient with concurrent severe 

eczema (Halcon & Milkus 2004). Bhushan & Beck (1997) reported a case of blistering dermatitis where 

a wart paint containing TTO had been used for a period of 4 months. The man had a positive patch test 

to 1% TTO, while 50 controls were negative on testing with 1% and 5% aqueous tea tree solutions. 

The case patient was treated with topical corticosteroids and recovered with no known sequelae 

(Halcon & Milkus 2004). 

It has been reported the case of a 18 year female patient in whom linear Immunoglobulin A (IgA) 

disease appears to have been precipitated by a contact reaction to TTO. Linear IgA disease is a rare 

acquired subepidermal blistering disorder, characterized by basement membrane zone IgA deposition 

(Perrett et al. 2003).  

Contraindications: Allergy to tea tree oil or to colophonium 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 71/73 

 


 

Not to be used orally use or as inhalation. Not to be used in eyes, ears or in the mouth. 

The patient should be advised to consult a doctor in cases with severe acne. 

To decrease the risk for side effects it is important to follow the instruction to dilute the product before 

use. 

5.4. 

 

Laboratory findings 

5.5. 

 

Safety in special populations and situations 

In vitro pharmacological interactions between TTO and conventional antimicrobials 

(ciprofloxacin⁄amphotericin B) when used in combination were investigated. Interactions of TTO when 

combined with ciprofloxacin against S. aureus indicate mainly antagonistic profiles. The interactions of 

TTO with amphotericin B indicate mainly antagonistic profiles when tested against C. albicans. The 

authors concluded that the predominant antagonistic interactions noted, suggest that therapies with 

TTO should be used with caution when combined with antibiotics (van Vuuren et al. 2009). 

Safety related to the use in pregnancy and lactation is unknown and therefore the use is not to be 

recommended.  



5.6. 

 

Overall conclusions on clinical safety 

Clinical studies and traditional use show that short-term use (not more than 1 month) of diluted TTO 

on skin or mucosa is safe, but it is not suitable to be used in the eye or ear.  

Reported adverse events were minor and mostly limited to local irritation. A case of blistering 

dermatitis has been reported with a wart paint containing TTO used for a period of 4 months. 

There is some evidence that 100% TTO can cause allergic reactions in some patients. The rate of 

allergic reactions reported in the literature in various patch testing studies ranges between 0.6% and 

2.4% (mean 1.6%). The incidence and strength of the reactions is generally higher with oxidised TTO 

samples. Proper storage and handling of TTO and its formulated products should avoid the 

development of these by-products and reduce the risk of skin irritation and sensitisation in sensitive 

individuals.  

Oral use results in poisoning. Accidental ingestion of 10-25 ml, demonstrates that at these relatively 

high doses, TTO causes Central Nervous System depression and muscle weakness. However, these 

symptoms had generally resolved within 36 hours. 

TTO was not genotoxic in in-vivo mouse micronucleus test (up to 1750 mg/kg). Ames test data are 

incomplete.  

Tests on reproductive toxicity and on carcinogenicity have not been performed. 

6. 

 

Overall conclusions 

Despite several studies show that the antiseptic properties of TTO in various conditions no herbal 

medicinal product used in clinical trials with positive outcome is currently authorised in Europe since a 

least 10 years and therefore the “well-established medicinal use” cannot be supported. However 

results of clinical studies reinforce the plausibility of the traditional uses of TTO preparations. 

TTO has been used as a traditional medicine for more than 30 years in Europe and worldwide, 

particularly in Australia for a number of indications. Some of them are supported by pharmacological or 

 

Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 



and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  

 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 72/73 

 


 

clinical data which confirm the antibacterial activity, antifungal activity, antiviral activity and 

antiprotozoal activity under controlled conditions. TTO has a broad spectrum antimicrobial activity with 

little evidence for inducing tolerance and resistance. TTO products are a useful addition to the range of 

skin hygiene and protection products. This type of product has a known safety profile with a long 

history of traditional use. 

Overall, a monograph on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. 

dissitiflora F. Mueller and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum radix is recommended with the 

following preparations and therapeutic indications. 

1) Traditional herbal medicinal product for treatment of small superficial wounds and insect bites: 

liquid preparation containing 0.5% to 10% of essential oil to be applied on the affected area 1-3 times 

daily. 

2) Traditional herbal medicinal product for treatment of small boils (furuncles and mild acne): oily 



liquid or semi-solid preparations containing 10% of essential oil, to be applied on the affected area 1-3 

times daily or 0,7-1 ml of essential oil stirred in 100 ml of lukewarm water to be applied as an 

impregnated dressing to the affected areas of the skin. 

3) Traditional herbal medicinal product for the relief of itching and irritation in cases of mild athlete´s 

foot: oily liquid or semi-solid preparations containing 10% of essential oil, to be applied on the affected 

area 1-3 times daily. 

4) Traditional herbal medicinal product for symptomatic treatment of minor inflammation of oral 

mucosa: 0.17 – 0.33 ml of TTO to be mixed in 100 ml of water for rinse or gargle several times daily 

for symptomatic treatment of minor inflammation of oral mucosa.  

Adverse skin reactions like smarting pain, mild pruritus, burning sensation, irritation, itching, stinging, 

erythema, oedema and allergic reactions have been reported. The frequency is not known.  

Burn-like skin reaction has been reported. The frequency is rare (<1/1.000). 

There is insufficient data to support the safety of TTO during pregnancy and lactation or in children 

under 12 years and therefore the use in this population groups is not recommended as a precautionary 

measure.  

The data on safety are considered sufficient to establish a list entry for the above mentioned 

preparations and indications. 

Annex 

List of references 

 

 



Assessment report on Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden and Betch) Cheel, M. linariifolia Smith, M. dissitiflora F. Mueller 

and/or other species of Melaleuca, aetheroleum  



 

EMA/HMPC/320932/2012  



Page 73/73 

 

Document Outline

  • Abbreviations
  • 1.   Introduction
    • 1.1.  Description of the herbal substance(s), herbal preparation(s) or combinations thereof
    • 1.2.   Information about products on the market in the Member States
      • Regulatory status overview
    • 1.3.  Search and assessment methodology
  • 2.  Historical data on medicinal use
    • 2.1.  Information on period of medicinal use in the Community
    • 2.2.  Information on traditional/current indications and specified substances/preparations
    • 2.3.  Specified strength/posology/route of administration/duration of use for relevant preparations and indications
  • 3.  Non-Clinical Data
    • 3.1.  Overview of available pharmacological data regarding the herbal substance(s), herbal preparation(s) and relevant constituents thereof
    • 3.2.  Overview of available pharmacokinetic data regarding the herbal substance(s), herbal preparation(s) and relevant constituents thereof
    • 3.3.  Overview of available toxicological data regarding the herbal substance(s)/herbal preparation(s) and constituents thereof
    • 3.4.  Overall conclusions on non-clinical data
  • 4.  Clinical Data
    • 4.1.  Clinical Pharmacology
      • 4.1.1.  Overview of pharmacodynamic data regarding the herbal substance(s)/preparation(s) including data on relevant constituents
      • 4.1.2.  Overview of pharmacokinetic data regarding the herbal substance(s)/preparation(s) including data on relevant constituents
    • 4.2.  Clinical Efficacy
      • 4.2.1.  Dose response studies
      • 4.2.2.  Clinical studies (case studies and clinical trials)
        • Clinical studies on effects of TTO were conducted for the following indications:
        • Clinical studies conducted with combinations containing TTO:
        • Clinical studies conducted with TTO:
        • Clinical studies conducted with combinations containing TTO:
      • 4.2.3.  Clinical studies in special populations (e.g. elderly and children)
    • 4.3.  Overall conclusions on clinical pharmacology and efficacy
  • 5.  Clinical Safety/Pharmacovigilance
    • 5.1.  Overview of toxicological/safety data from clinical trials in humans
    • 5.2.  Patient exposure
    • 5.3.  Adverse events and serious adverse events and deaths
    • 5.4.  Laboratory findings
    • 5.5.  Safety in special populations and situations
    • 5.6.  Overall conclusions on clinical safety
  • 6.  Overall conclusions
  • Annex
    • List of references


Yüklə 0,61 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə