Patient information leaflet



Yüklə 31,81 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix28.04.2017
ölçüsü31,81 Kb.

 



1



HALLUX VALGUS (BUNION) 

PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET 

 

Hallux  Valgus  is  the  scientific  name  for  a  bunion,  which  refers  to  a 

condition  in  which  the  big  toe  is  angled  towards  the  second  toe.  In  a 

normal foot, the big toe and the long bone that leads up to it – the first 

metatarsal – are in a straight line. However, hallux valgus occurs when 

your long foot bone veers toward the other foot and your big toe drifts 

towards your second toe.  

 

 



What causes hallux valgus? 

No single cause has been proven. Genetics (a family history of bunions), footwear and foot 

mechanics are considered as possible factors. 

 

Symptoms and problems caused by hallux valgus 

Your bunions may not cause you any trouble, but sometimes they can cause: 

 

 



Pain - you may have difficulty walking due to pain, redness and swelling 

 

The foot may become wide so that it can be difficult to find wide enough shoes 



 

You may get arthritis in the big toe 

 

The second toe can become displaced by the misshapen great toe. This can cause a 



‘transfer metatarsalgia’ with body weight being shifted from the ball of the big toe 

to the ball of the smaller toes, which are less adept at taking increased load. 

 

Juvenile Hallux Valgus 

Hallux  valgus  can  occur  in  children.  This  is  called  ‘Juvenile  Hallux  Valgus’.  Wear  and  tear 

arthritis known as degenerative joint arthritis or osteoarthritis which is common with adult 

hallux valgus is usually rare in Juvenile Hallux Valgus.  

 

INITIAL TREATMENTS FOR HALLUX VALGUS 

 

FOOTWEAR  – WIDER, DEEPER SHOES. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

One  of  the  best  things  you  can  do  is  to  go  for  wider,  deeper  shoes.  There  should  be  a 

centimeter  between  the  end  of  your  longest  toe  and  the  end  of  the  shoe.  Shoes  with  an 

adjustable fastening e.g. a lace, buckle or

 

velcro strap allow for “width” across the forefoot. 



The  forefoot  being  the  area  that  has  been  widened  or  broadened  by  the  shape  of  the 

bunion. A wider, deeper shoe will limit rubbing of the shoe on the skin overlying the hallux 

                                                           

1

 



Patient information leaflet: Hallux Valgus October 2014

 

 



 

 

 



 

valgus.  In  turn  this  reduces  the  chances  of  pain  and  inflammation  in  this  area  and  also 



reduces the development of callus and corns.  

 

Slip-on shoes and high heels can increase your discomfort. Slip on shoes  have to be tighter 



to stay on your feet, so you have less room for your toes. With nothing to hold your foot in 

place,  your  toes  often  slide  to  the  end  of  your  shoe  where  they  are  exposed  to  pressure. 

High  heels  throw  more  weight  onto  the  ball  of  the  foot,  putting  your  toes  under  further 

pressure and onto uncomfortable joints. 

 

If it is essential to wear smart dress shoes e.g. dress code for work – consider wearing wider, 



deeper  shoes  outside  work  hours  e.g.  trainers.  This  should  help  to  reduce  any  discomfort 

you are experiencing

 

with your bunion.  



 

Padding 

Padding using materials such as fleecy web, fleecy foam, felt or gel hallux valgus covers can 

help protect the skin and joints from footwear friction/rubbing caused by your footwear. 

 

 



 

OTHER TREATMENTS FOR HALLUX VALGUS 

 

Juvenile hallux valgus 

Research  to  date  has  shown  that  foot  orthoses  -  an  insole  which  supports  and  influences 

the mechanics of the foot DO NOT stop bunions from developing.  

 

Research has shown that night splints for juvenile hallux valgus can help reduce progression 



of  hallux  valgus.  The  research  recommends  the  use  of  night  splints  with  the  objective  of 

stabilizing the deformity, while orthoses could be used during the day for symptom relief. 



 

 

 

SURGERY 

 

Surgery is not available on the NHS for cosmetic correction of bunions. The aim of surgery 

is to correct  the cause of the bunion and reduce the  symptoms. Your Podiatric Surgeon or 

Foot & Ankle Orthopaedic Consultant will discuss the best procedure for you dependent on 

your individual issues. There are over 130 different procedures for bunions. With all surgical 

procedures there are risks and complications with any type of surgery, therefore surgery is 

not usually advised unless your bunions are causing pain – or if it is starting to deform your 

other toes. 

Some examples of surgical procedures:  

 

Silvers  procedure  –  this  is  the  simplest  procedure  that  involves  removing  the  prominent 

bump on the inside of the foot. But because it doesn’t cure the underlying deformity, it will 

only  be  used  in  people  with  mild  deformities  or in  older  people.  This  is  a  short  procedure 

and  the  recovery  is  quick.  Patients  determined  suitable  for  this  procedure  will  spend  6 


 

weeks in a post operative boot and will need to take time off work for a minimum of 3 to 4 



weeks. Those in a sedentary job may be allowed to return to work at week 3 or 4 following 

this operation. It can take 3 to 6 months before the swelling following the surgery subsides 

so until then an oversized shoe may need to be worn. 

 

Chevron  osteotomies  –  this  is  again  suitable  for  mild  to  modest  Hallux  Valgus  without 

arthritis  of  the  toe  joint  (known  as  the  first  metatarsophalangeal  joint).  This  procedure 

involves cutting the bone  toward the end of the first metatarsal (the long bone leading up 

to the big toe), before fixing it back into a straighter position. You’ll need to rest the foot for 

two  to  four  days.  Patients  determined  suitable  for  this  procedure  will  spend  6  weeks  in  a 

post  operative  boot  and  will  need  to  take  time  off  work  for  a  minimum  of  3  to  4  weeks. 

Those  in  a  sedentary  job  may  be  allowed  to  return  to  work  at  week  3  or  4  following  this 

operation.  It  can  take  3  to  6  months  before  the  swelling  following  the  surgery  subsides  so 

until then an oversized shoe may need to be worn. 

 

Base wedge osteotomy e.g. Lapidus – this is for more pronounced deformities. Recovery is 

longer. You’ll need to wear a non-weight bearing cast  for 4-6 weeks (i.e. you

 

can’t walk on 



it)  and  possibly  a  weight–bearing  cast  for  2-4  weeks.

 

A  wedge  of  bone  is  removed  at  the 



base  of  the  first  metatarsal  bone  in  order  to  re-align  the  big  toe  joint  and  held  in  place 

whilst is unites (heals). Internal fixation (plates, screws or pins) is used to hold the bone cut 

together.  You  will  not  notice  these  and  they  do  not  usually  need  to  be  removed.  It  is 

sometimes  necessary  to  perform  a  similar  procedure  on  the  big  toe  (Akin  osteotomy)  to 

achieve  full correction. Those in  non-manual work  may be able  to return  in approximately 

6-8 weeks & those in manual work approximately 10-12 weeks

 

 

 



 

References: 

 

Use of text with permission from Patient.co.uk available at 

http://www.patient.co.uk/health/bunions © 2014, Egton Medical Information Systems Limited. 

All Rights

 

Reserved. 

 

MacFarlan  AJH,  Kilmartin  TE.  Conservative  treatment  of  juvenile  hallux  valgus  –  A  seven  year 



prospective study. Br J Podiatry 2004; 7: 101 – 105 

 

www.scpod.org/foot-health/common-foot-problems/bunions-toe-deformities 



 

 

 

 



 

 

Patient information leaflet: Hallux Valgus October 2014



 

Yüklə 31,81 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə