Perth Dilhorn House, 2 Bulwer Street Perth wa 6000 t (08) 9227 2600 f (08) 9227 2699


GOVERNMENT AND PARLIAMENTARY STAKEHOLDERS



Yüklə 11,21 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/6
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11,21 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6

GOVERNMENT AND PARLIAMENTARY STAKEHOLDERS 

NON-GOVERNMENT STAKEHOLDERS 

Murray Criddle MLC 

Action Group Against Stable Fly 

Bruce Donaldson MLC 

Frogmoor Commercial Association 

Anthony Fels MLC 

WA Farmers Federation 

Margaret Rowe MLC 

Moore Catchment Council 

Landskills WA (Ag Department) 

Ellen-Brockman Integrated Catchment Group 

 

Lower Moore River Working Group Inc 



DPAW ACQUISITION 

Agreement to Acquire 

Aurora  Environmental  has  been  engaged  in  on-going  dialogue  with  DPAW  regarding  the  proposed 

acquisition of the offset area.  The Department has confirmed that it is interested in acquiring the 

land identified in Attachment 2 as the proposed offset.  

The  acquisition  of  the  offset  area  is  a  sound  proposal  given  that  the  vegetation  is  within  the 

modelled distribution of Carnaby’s Cockatoo, contains high value habitat and is in close proximity to 

the Boonanarring Nature Reserve.  DPAW has previously secured vegetation on the landholding for 

conservation  as  part  of  offsets  for  other  projects.    The  previously  acquired  bushland  is  directly 

adjacent to the proposed offset area. 

Aurigen has agreed with DPAW the following: 

  Initial transfer of the 189.14ha offset area as depicted on Attachment 2.  The transfer will be 



achieved via subdivision. 

  Aurigen will meet the nominal costs associated with the subdivision. 



  DPAW will manage the subdivision process. 

  Aurigen will manage the interface between the offset area and the landfill project via fencing 



and periodic inspection for weeds, windblown litter and illegally dumped wastes. The offset area 

condition is not to diminish below current levels as a result of the landfill project. 

  Following  decommissioning,  Aurigen  will  transfer  to  DPAW  the  area  of  land  where  the 



weighbridge, office facilities and storage area are located.  Prior to decommissioning of the site, 

Aurigen will discuss and agree with DPAW the transfer details. 

  Aurigen will provide a copy of the annual compliance report to DPAW. 



Aurigen  remains  committed  to  implementing  appropriate  site  management  practices  during  the 

construction,  operation  and  decommissioning  phases.    These  practices  include  making  the  site 

secure  through  the  use  of  fencing,  gates  and  a  controlled  entry/exit  point  so  that  authorised 

personnel and vehicles can enter the site.  The general public will not have direct access to the site.   

Wastes will be delivered to the site by covered vehicles which will be unloaded in the active cell and 

in the vicinity of the active tipping facing.  One active tipping face will be operational at a time, with 

compaction and covering of waste taking place daily.  Perimeter fencing around the site boundary 


Department of Environment 

Fernview Farms EPBC Referral 

Request for Information 

Aurora Environmental 

CIS2015-001-EPBC-005_pz 



22 March 2017 

and litter fences around the active cell will reduce the occurrence of windblown rubbish impacting 

adjacent conservation areas.  Litter fencing and the perimeter fencing will be inspected regularly by 

staff.  Where windblown wastes or illegally dumped rubbish is noted by staff, these will be collected 

and disposed of.  Site speed limits will apply to reduce the risks associated with the loss of wastes 

from vehicles. 



ACQUISITION MECHANISM 

The offset  area  will  be  subdivided  from  the  landholding  and  transferred  to  the State Government.  

This approach has been followed in the past for the acquisition of other offset sites.  The subdivision 

process will be managed by DPAW and the nominal costs will be met by Aurigen. 



CONTINGENCY MEASURES 

DPAW has indicated that it would like to secure the offset site for conservation purposes.  Subject to 

Aurigen  receiving  approval  to  implement  the  project,  the  subdivision  and  transfer  to  the  State 

Government will proceed.   

If  the  subdivision  and  transfer  does  not  proceed,  Aurigen  will  investigate  options  to  secure  a 

conservation  covenant  over  the  offset  area.    The  covenant  will  be  registered  on  the  Certificate  of 

Title.    Under  these  circumstances,  an  environmental  management  plan  would  be  prepared  and 

implemented for the offset area to the satisfaction of the DoEE. 

Please  feel  free  to  contact  the  undersigned  if  you  have  any  queries  relating  to the  content  of  this 

letter.   

For and on behalf of Aurora Environmental, 

 

Paul Zuvela 



Manager – EIA / Director 

 

Attachments: 



1.

  Black Cockatoo Habitat Assessment (Harewood, 2016) 

2.

  Offset Area and Black Cockatoo Habitat Ratings 



 

 

 

 



 

 

ATTACHMENT 1 

 

Black Cockatoo Habitat Assessment 

(Harewood, 2016) 

 

 

Black Cockatoo

Habitat Assessment

Lot 98 Wannamal Road South

Cullalla

June 2016



Version 2

On behalf of:

Aurora Environmental

2 Bulwer Street

PERTH WA 6000

T: (08) 9227 2600

Prepared by:

Greg Harewood

Zoologist

PO Box 755

BUNBURY WA 6231

M: 0402 141 197

T/F: (08) 9725 0982

E: gharewood@iinet.net.au



LOT 98 WANNAMAL ROAD – CULLALLA – BLACK COCKATOO HABITAT ASSESSMENT – JUNE 2016 – V2

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SUMMARY

1.

INTRODUCTION..................................................................................... 3



2.

SCOPE OF WORKS ............................................................................... 3

3.

METHODS .............................................................................................. 4



3.1

Black Cockatoo Foraging Habitat .....................................................................................4

3.2

Black Cockatoo Breeding Habitat.....................................................................................5



3.3

Black Cockatoo Roosting Habitat .....................................................................................6

4.

SURVEY CONSTRAINTS ....................................................................... 7



5.

RESULTS ............................................................................................... 7

5.1

Black Cockatoo Foraging Habitat .....................................................................................7



5.2

Black Cockatoo Breeding Habitat...................................................................................14

5.3

Black Cockatoo Roosting Habitat ...................................................................................15



6.

CONCLUSION ...................................................................................... 15

7.

REFERENCES...................................................................................... 16



LOT 98 WANNAMAL ROAD – CULLALLA – BLACK COCKATOO HABITAT ASSESSMENT – JUNE 2016 – V2

TABLES

TABLE 1:


Criteria for Assessing Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo Foraging Value 

(Source: Aurora 2016 pers. comm.)

TABLE 2:

Identified Flora Species within the Subject Site and Black Cockatoo 

Foraging Status

TABLE 3:


Foraging Habitat Areas

TABLE 4:


Foraging Evidence Examples

TABLE 5:


Summary of Potential Black Cockatoo Habitat Trees (DBH >50cm) 

within the Subject Site



FIGURES

FIGURE 1:

Subject Site and Surrounds

FIGURE 2:

Air Photo

FIGURE 3:

Proposed Offset Area and Works Footprint

FIGURE 4:

Vegetation Units (Modified from Coffey 2017) & Photo Points

FIGURE 5:

Foraging Value

APPENDICES

APPENDIX A:

Photo Point Habitat Photographs and Details

APPENDIX B:

Black Cockatoo Habitat Tree Details


LOT 98 WANNAMAL ROAD – CULLALLA – BLACK COCKATOO HABITAT ASSESSMENT – JUNE 2016 – V2

Page i

SUMMARY

This report details the results of a black cockatoo habitat assessment over sections of 

Lot 98 Wannamal Road South, Cullalla (the subject site) (Figure 1 and 2).

It is understood that a 66.6 hectare (ha) section of Lot 98 is proposed to be developed 

as a landfill facility (works footprint) (Figure 3).  The development will require the 

clearance of some remnant native vegetation that has been identified as representing 

black cockatoo foraging habitat of varying quality.  

Because of potential impacts on Carnaby’s black cockatoo habitat the proposed 

development had been referred to the Federal Department of the Environment (DotE) 

for assessment (Aurora (2015) - EPBC referral 2015/7621).  To offset the loss of black 

cockatoo foraging habitat and to facilitate approvals, the proponent is offering an area 

of Banksia woodland, also within Lot 98 (Figure 3).

Previous flora and fauna survey work was completed by ATA Environmental/Coffey in 

2007 (Coffey 2007) and an assessment of foraging value was also completed by 

Coffey in 2010/2011 (Aurora (2015) - Figure 4: Foraging Value).  Given the age of this 

data the DotE have requested an updated black cockatoo habitat assessment be 

conducted over the proposed works footprint.  In addition, the proponent has requested 

the offset area also be assessed so that a comparison of habitat values between the 

two areas can be made.

Vegetation units within the subject site are shown in Figure 4 along with the location of 

habitat photo points.  The plan has generally followed the units identified by Coffey 

(2007), though given that a detailed botanical assessment has not been carried out to 

determine the full characteristics of the various broad units seen, some have been 

combined (e.g. all banksia woodland units).  Some units have also been split and/or 

their extent changed based on observations made during the field survey carried out in 

May 2016.

A review of the 156 flora species currently identified within Lot 98 indicates that 15 are 

documented as known food sources for Carnaby’s black cockatoos.  Eleven of these 

have been recorded in parts of the proposed offset area and 10 within the balance of 

the site (includes two introduces species).  Another nine species of plant recorded 

within the offset area may possibly be foraged upon but this is based on other 

members of their genus being documented as a known food source.  Eight potential 

foraging species have been recorded in the balance of the subject site.

The estimated foraging value of the various sections of the proposed offset area and 

works footprint are shown in Figure 5.  Habitat photographs taken at each photo point 

where foraging scores was primarily assessed are held in Appendix A.

As indicated in Figure 5, the proposed offset area has an estimated foraging value of 

between 3 and 4 with most areas being rated as 4, primarily as a consequence of the 



LOT 98 WANNAMAL ROAD – CULLALLA – BLACK COCKATOO HABITAT ASSESSMENT – JUNE 2016 – V2

Page ii

dominance of banksia woodland over much of the area.  Most of the areas rated as 3 

are in the relatively early stages of regrowth after an historical clearing event or fire.  

The balance of the site, outside of the proposed offset area, have ratings ranging from 

0 (cleared areas) to 4.  Areas with the higher ratings (3 and 4) are again characterised 

by the presence of banksia which is generally absent from areas rated as having a 

lower foraging value.

A breakdown of the extent of each assigned foraging rating within the works footprint 

and the proposed offset area are shown in Table 3 below.

Table: Foraging Habitat Areas

Area

Assigned 

Foraging 

Rating

Hectares

% of Total Hectares

Works 


Footprint

0 to 1


29.8

44.7


1 to 2

6.3


9.5

3

12.9



19.4

4

17.6



26.5

Total

66.6

100.0

Proposed 

Offset Area

0 to 1


2.4

1.1


3

89.4


39.8

4

132.6



59.1

Total

224.3

100

Eight potential “black cockatoo breeding habitat trees” were located within a small 

section of the proposed offset area, all within vegetation unit “EmW” as shown in Figure 

4. Five of the eight potential “habitat trees” appeared to contain hollows with entrances 

large enough to allow entry of a black cockatoo.  The actual size of each possible 

hollow could however not be determined and no evidence of any hollow being used by 

a black cockatoo for nesting purposes was seen.

No evidence of black cockatoos roosting within the subject site was found and most of 

the vegetation is probably unlikely to be used for this purpose, given the dominance of 

low banksia woodlands. 

The results suggest that while some vegetation within the proposed works footprint has 

a “moderate foraging value” the majority has “no or negligible to low foraging value”.  

Most of the proposed offset area has a “moderate foraging value” with the balance 

having a “low to moderate foraging value”.  The potential value of the offset area to 

cockatoos is also increased to a small degree by the presence of a small number of 

“black cockatoo breeding habitat trees”.



LOT 98 WANNAMAL ROAD – CULLALLA – BLACK COCKATOO HABITAT ASSESSMENT – JUNE 2016 – V2

Page 3

1.

INTRODUCTION

This report details the results of a black cockatoo habitat assessment over sections 

of Lot 98 Wannamal Road South, Cullalla (the subject site) (Figure 1 and 2).  Lot 98 

is a privately owned property and is referred to as Fernview Farm.

It is understood that a 66.6 hectare (ha) section of Lot 98 is proposed to be 

developed as a landfill facility (works footprint) (Figure 3).  The development will 

require the clearance of about 42 ha of re-growth remnant native vegetation 

including some Banksia woodland.  Some of this remnant native vegetation has 

been identified as representing black cockatoo foraging habitat of varying quality.  

Because of potential impacts on Carnaby’s black cockatoo habitat the proposed 

development had been referred to the Federal Department of the Environment 

(DotE) for assessment (Aurora (2015) - EPBC referral 2015/7621).  To offset the 

loss of black cockatoo foraging habitat and to facilitate approvals, the proponent is 

offering ~ 224 ha tract of Banksia woodland, also within Lot 98, which if accepted, 

will have ownership transferred to the state (Figure 3).

Previous flora and fauna survey work was completed by ATA Environmental/Coffey 

in 2007 to support the State Environmental approval process (Coffey 2007) and an 

assessment of foraging value was also completed by Coffey in 2010/2011 (Aurora 

(2015) - Figure 4: Foraging Value).  Given the age of this data the DotE have 

requested an updated black cockatoo habitat assessment be conducted over the 

proposed works footprint.  In addition, the proponent has requested the offset area 

also be assessed so that a comparison of habitat values between the two areas can 

be made.

2.

SCOPE OF WORKS

The scope of works, as define by Aurora Environmental, was to:

Carry out a black cockatoo habitat assessment with the primary aim of 

determining the extent and relative quality of foraging habitat within the 

defined survey areas (i.e. works footprint and offset area).  Among other 

details to be collected, site photos of the habitat are to be taken and the 

location of these to be recorded.

The assessment is to be completed in accordance with relevant sections of 

the  EPBC Referral Guidelines for black cockatoos (SEWPaC 2012) and the 

Survey Guidelines for Australia’s Threatened Birds (SEWPaC 2010).  

Preparation of a report summarising all results.


LOT 98 WANNAMAL ROAD – CULLALLA – BLACK COCKATOO HABITAT ASSESSMENT – JUNE 2016 – V2

Page 4

3.

METHODS

The assessment has included a review of previous surveys carried out at the subject

site and a field survey carried out by the Author on the 28 April 2016. So as to 

comply with the requested scope of works and in line with the published guidelines 

the following methods were employed.

3.1

Black Cockatoo Foraging Habitat

The nature and extent of potential foraging habitat within the study area was 

assessed in a number of ways.  The vegetation unit map created by Coffey has 

been reviewed and expanded to include areas not previously assessed.  This has 

not involved a detailed botanical assessment but is simply based on the broad 

vegetation types observed during the field survey.

A listing of potential foraging species present within the subject site has also been 

compiled.  This was primarily based on the flora survey results provided by Coffey 

(Coffey 2007), in addition to observations made during the field survey.  The 

foraging potential of each plant species identified has been assessed using 

available literature and placed into one of three categories:

Known – specific plant species documented in literature as being foraged 

upon by Carnaby’s black cockatoos;

Possible - specific plant species NOT documented in literature as being 

foraged upon by Carnaby’s black cockatoos but plant species of the same 

genus/closely related species have been; or

Not Documented - specific plant species NOT documented in literature as 

being foraged upon by Carnaby’s black cockatoos.

Primary sources of information for Carnaby’s black cockatoo foraging species have 

included DPaW (2016), Davies (1966), DEC (2012), Groom (2011), Higgins (1999), 

Johnstone and Storr (1998), Johnstone and Kirkby (2011), Saunders (1974, 1979a, 

1979b, 1980 & 1986), Saunders et al. (1982), SEWPaC (2012) and Shah (2006).

The foraging value to Carnaby’s black cockatoos of the remnant vegetation within 

the subject site has also been assessed using the criteria listed in Table 1 below.

The assessment of foraging value of the various vegetation units was carried during 

the field survey and included the establishment of “photo points” at 32 locations 

across the subject site.  At each point the foraging value, based on criteria listed in 

Table 1 was estimated and recorded along with other relevant details (e.g. dominant 

plant species, GPS coordinates).  


LOT 98 WANNAMAL ROAD – CULLALLA – BLACK COCKATOO HABITAT ASSESSMENT – JUNE 2016 – V2

Page 5

Table 1: Criteria for Assessing Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo Foraging Value

(Source: Aurora 2016 pers. comm.)

Site Score 

Example Description of Vegetation 

0: No foraging value. 

No Proteaceae, eucalypts or other potential sources 

of food such as salt lakes and bare ground. 

1: Negligible to low foraging value. 

Scattered specimens of known food plants but 

projected foliage cover of these <2% including urban 

areas with scattered foraging trees;  

Blue gum plantations. 

2: Low foraging value. 

Shrubland in which species of foraging value, such as 

shrubby banksias, with <10% projected foliage cover;  

Open eucalypt woodland/mallee of small-fruited 

species; 

Paddocks with melons or other weeds known to be 

foraged upon by Carnaby’s black cockatoo (a short-

term, seasonal food source). 



3: Low to Moderate foraging value. 

Shrubland in which species of foraging value, such as 

shrubby banksias, with 10-20% projected foliage 

cover;  


Woodland with tree banksias 2-20% projected foliage 

cover; 


Eucalypt woodland/mallee of small-fruited species 

and/or marri <20% project foliage cover. 



4: Moderate foraging value. 

Woodland with tree banksias 20-40% projected 

foliage cover; 

Eucalypt woodland/forest with marri 20-40% 

projected foliage cover. 

5: Moderate to High foraging value. 

Banksia woodlands with tree banksias 40%- 60%.  

Vegetation condition moderate due to weed invasion 

and some tree deaths. 

6: High foraging value 

Banksia woodlands of key species (e.g. B. attenuata

B. menziesii) with projected foliage cover >60%.  

Vegetation condition good with low weed invasion 

and low tree death to indicate it is robust and unlikely 

to decline in the medium term. 

The location and nature of actual black cockatoo foraging evidence (e.g. chewed 

fruits around base of trees) observed opportunistically during the field survey was 

also recorded.

3.2

Black Cockatoo Breeding Habitat

The black cockatoo breeding habitat assessment has involved the identification of 

all suitable breeding trees species (native, endemic species only) within the subject 

site that had a diametre at breast height (DBH) of equal to or over 50cm.  The DBH 

of each tree assessed was estimated using a pre-made 50 cm “caliper”.


LOT 98 WANNAMAL ROAD – CULLALLA – BLACK COCKATOO HABITAT ASSESSMENT – JUNE 2016 – V2

Page 6

The location of each tree identified as being equal to or over the threshold DBH was 

recorded with a GPS and details on tree species, number and size of hollows (if 

any) noted.

Target tree species included

marri


and

jarrah or any other endemic 



Corymbia/Eucalyptus species of a suitable size that was present.  Peppermints, 

banksia, sheoak and melaleuca tree species (for example) were not assessed as 

these typically do not develop hollows that are used by black cockatoos.

Based on this assessment, trees present within the subject site have been place into 

one of four categories:

Tree < 50cm DBH or/and an unsuitable species (not recorded);

Tree >50cm DBH, no hollows seen;

Tree >50cm DBH, one or more hollows seen, none of which were considered 

suitable for black cockatoos to use for nesting; or

Tree >50cm DBH, one or more hollows seen, with at least one considered 

possibly suitable for black cockatoos to use for nesting.

For the purposes of this assessment a tree containing a potential cockatoo nest 

hollow was defined as:



Generally any tree which is alive or dead that contains one or more visible 

hollows (cavities within the trunk or branches) suitable for occupation by a

black cockatoo for the purpose of nesting/breeding.  Hollows that had an 

entrance greater than about 10cm in diameter and would allow the entry of a 

black cockatoo into a suitably orientated and sized branch/trunk were

recorded as a “potential black cockatoo nest hollow”.

Identified hollows were examined using binoculars for evidence of actual use by 

black cockatoos (e.g. chewing around hollow entrance, scarring and scratch marks 

on trunks and branches).




Yüklə 11,21 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə