Priority ecological communities for western australia version 21 Species and Communities Branch, Department of Parks and Wildlife



Yüklə 0,62 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/6
tarix06.09.2017
ölçüsü0,62 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6

PRIORITY ECOLOGICAL COMMUNITIES FOR WESTERN AUSTRALIA VERSION 21

Species and Communities Branch, Department of Parks and Wildlife 

4 May 2014

Possible threatened ecological communities that do not meet survey criteria or that are not 

adequately defined are added to the priority ecological community list under priorities 1, 2 and 3. 

These three categories are ranked in order of priority for survey and/or definition of the 

community, and evaluation of conservation status, so that consideration can be given to their 

declaration as threatened ecological communities. Ecological communities that are adequately 

known, and are rare but not threatened or meet criteria for near threatened, or that have been 

recently removed from the threatened list, are placed in priority 4. These ecological communities 

require regular monitoring. Conservation dependent ecological communities are placed in priority 

5

Note: 


i) Nothing in this table may be construed as a nomination for listing under the Commonwealth 

EPBC Act 1999

ii) The inclusion in this table of a community type does not necessarily imply any status as a 

threatened ecological community, however some communities are listed as threatened ecological 

communties (TECs) under the EPBC Act (see column D). 

iii) Regions eg Pilbara are based on Department of Parks and Wildlife regional boundaries.

iv) For definitions of categories (priority 1 etc.) refer to document entitled ‘Definitions and 

Categories’.



Community name

Category 

(WA)

Category 

EPBC Act

PILBARA

1

West Angelas Cracking-Clays

Priority 1

Open tussock grasslands of Astrebla pectinata, A. elymoides, Aristida latifolia , in combination with Astrebla 



squarrosa  and low scattered shrubs of Sida fibulifera , on basalt derived cracking-clay loam depressions and 

flowlines.

Threats: Disturbance footprints increasing from mine, future infrastructure development, possible weed 

invasion and changes in fire regime.

2

Weeli Wolli Spring community

Priority 1

Weeli Wolli Spring's riparian woodland and forest associations are unusual as a consequence of the 

composition of the understorey. The sedge and herbfield communities that fringe many of the pools and 

associated water bodies along the main channels of Weeli Wolli Creek have not been recorded from any other 

wetland site in the Pilbara. The spring and creekline are also noted for their relatively high diversity of 

stygofauna and this is probably attributed to the large-scale calcrete and alluvial aquifer system associated 

with the creek. The valley of Weeli Wolli Spring also supports a very rich microbat assemblage including a 

threatened species. 

Threats: dewatering and re-watering altering patterns of inundation, weed invasion 

3

Burrup Peninsula rock pool communities 

Priority 1

Calcareous tufa deposits. Interesting aquatic snails.

Threats: recreational impacts, and potential development; possibly NOX and SOX emissions.  

4

Burrup Peninsula rock pile communities 

Priority 1

Pockets of vegetation in rock piles and outcrops. Comprise a mixture of Pilbara and Kimberley species, 

communities are different from those of the Hamersley and Chichester Ranges. Short-range endemic land 

snails.

Threats: industrial development dust emissions, buffel grass



5

Roebourne Plains coastal grasslands with gilgai microrelief on deep cracking clays (Roebourne Plains 

gilgai grasslands)

Priority 1

The Roebourne Plains coastal grasslands with gilgai micro-relief occur on deep cracking clays that are self 

mulching and emerge on depositional surfaces. The Roebourne Plains gilgai grasslands occur on microrelief 

of deep cracking clays, surrounded by clay plains/flats and sandy coastal and alluvial plains. The gilgai 

depressions supports ephemeral and perennial tussock grasslands dominated by Sorghum  sp and Eragrostis 

xerophila  (Roebourne Plains grass) along with other native species including Astrebla  pectinata  (barley 

mitchell grass), Eriachne  benthamii  (swamp wanderrie grass), Chrysopogon  fallax  (golden beard grass) and 



Panicum  decompositum  (native millet). Restricted to the Karratha area, this community differs from the 

surrounding clay flats of the Horseflat land system which are dominated by Eragrostis xerophila  and other 

perennial tussock grass species (Eragrostis  mostly). 

Threats: Grazing, clearing for mining and infrastructure and urban development, weed invasion, basic raw 

material extraction.

6

Stony Chenopod association of the Roebourne Plains area

Priority 1


The community is dominated by Eragrostis xerophila  and chenopods growing in saline clay soils with dense 

surface strew of pebbles and cobbles. The association appears to be uncommon and is likely to be linked with 

the Cheerawarra land system (Unit 3 - Saline clay plains). Only one occurrence has been located to date 

(Roebourne Airport), however it is likely some other small areas remain. 

 Threats: grazing, clearing, and weeds especially buffel grass

7

Barrow Island subterranean fauna 

Priority 1

Barrow Island stygofauna and troglofauna.

Threats: Mining and industrial development.

8

Subterranean invertebrate communities of mesas in the Robe Valley region

Priority 1

A series of isolated mesas occur in the Robe Valley in the state’s Pilbara Region. The mesas are remnants of 

old valley infill deposits of the palaeo Robe River. The troglobitic faunal communities occur in an extremely 

specialised habitat and appear to require the particular structure and hydrogeology associated with mesas to 

provide a suitable humid habitat. Short range endemism is common in the fauna. The habitat is the humidified 

pisolitic strata.

Threats: Mining

9

Subterranean invertebrate community of pisolitic hills in the Pilbara 

Priority 1

A series of isolated low undulating hills occur in the state’s Pilbara region. The troglofauna are being 

identified as having very short range distributions.

Threats: mining

10

Peedamulla Marsh vegetation complex 

Priority 1

Peedamulla (Cane River) Swamp Cyperaceae community, near mouth of Cane River. Plants are unusual.

Threats: grazing, weed invasion, altered surface hydrologic flows.

11

Triodia angusta  dominated creekline vegetation (Barrow Island)

Priority 1

General cover of Triodia angusta  with shrubs principally Hakea suberea Petalostylis labicheoides, Acacia 

bivenosa , and Gossypium robinsonii .  

Threats: basic raw material extraction for island infrastructure.

12

Brockman Iron cracking clay communities of the Hamersley Range

Priority 1

Rare tussock grassland dominated by Astrebla lappacea  (not every site has presence of Astrebla) in the 

Hamersley Range, on the Brockman land system. Tussock grassland on cracking clays- derived in valley 

floors, depositional floors. This is a rare community and the landform is rare. Known from near West Angeles, 

Newman, Tom Price and boundary of Hamersley and Brockman Stations.

Threats: Heavily grazed, mining and infrastructure developments. 

13

Sand Sheet vegetation (Robe Valley)

Priority 3(iii)

Corymbia zygophylla  scattered low trees over Acacia tumida  var. pilbarensis Grevillea eriostachya  high 

shrubland over Triodia schinzii  hummock grassland. Other associated species include Cleome uncifera 



Heliotropium transforme Indigofera boviperda  subsp. boviperda , and Ptilotus arthrolasius 

Most northern example/expression of vegetation of Carnarvon Basin. Community is poorly represented type in 

the Pilbara Region, and not represented in the reserve system. Community contains many plant species that are 

at their northern limits or exist as disjunct populations. Vulnerable to invasion by weeds.

Threats: mining, basic raw material extraction, weed invasion especially buffel grass.

14

Mingah Springs calcrete groundwater assemblage type on Gascoyne palaeodrainage on Mingah Spring 



Station

Priority 1

Unique assemblages of invertebrates have been identified in the groundwater calcretes.

Threats: mining 

15

Coastal dune native tussock grassland dominated by Whiteochloa airoides

Priority 3

Tussock grassland of Whiteochloa airoides  occurs on the landward side of foredunes, hind dunes or remnant 

dunes with white or pinkish white medium sands with marine fragments. There may be occasional Spinifex 



longifolius  tussock or Triodia epactia  hummock grasses and scattered low shrubs of Olearia dampierii 

subsp. dampierii Scaevola spinescen s, S. cunninghamii, Trianthema turgidifolia  and Corchorus  species (C. 



walcottii, C. laniflorus ).

Occurs on Barrow Island and possibly some unaffected littoral areas in west Pilbara.



Threats: weed invasion especially buffel grass and kapok, basic raw material extraction.

16

Freshwater claypans of the Fortescue Valley

Priority 1

Freshwater claypans downstream of the Fortescue Marsh - Goodiadarrie Hills on Mulga Downs Station.

Important for waterbirds, invertebrates and some poorly collected plants. Eriachne  spp., Eragrostis  spp. 

grasslands. Unique community, has few Coolibah.



Threats: weed invasion, infrastructure corridors, altered hydrological flows, inappropriate fire regimes.

17

Fortescue Marsh (Marsh Land System) 

Priority 1

Fortescue Marsh is an extensive, episodically inundated samphire marsh at the upper terminus of the 

Fortescue River and the western end of Goodiadarrie Hills. It is regarded as the largest ephemeral wetland in 

the Pilbara. It is a highly diverse ecosystem with fringing mulga woodlands (on the northern side), samphire 

shrublands and groundwater dependant riparian ecosystems. It is an arid wetland utilized by waterbirds and 

supports a rich diversity of restricted aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates. Recorded locality for night parrot 

and bilby and several other threatened vertebrate fauna. Endemic Eremophila  species, populations of priority 

flora and several near endemic and new to science samphires.  

Threats: mining, altered hydrology (watering with fresh water), grazing and weed invasion.

18

Tanpool land system

Priority 1

A highly restricted land system that occurs between Pannawonica and Onslow. Consists of stony plains and 

low ridges of sandstone and other sedimentary rocks supporting hard spinifex grasslands and snakewood 

shrublands.

Threats: grazing

19

Stygofaunal community of the Bungaroo Aquifer

Priority 1

A unique assemblage of aquatic subterranean fauna including eels, snails and other stygofauna.

Threats: groundwater drawdown, mining.

20

Coolibah-lignum flats: Eucalyptus victrix  over Muehlenbeckia  community 

Woodland or forest of Eucalyptus victrix  (coolibah) over thicket of Muehlenbeckia florulenta  (lignum) on red 

clays in run-on zones. Associated species include Eriachne benthamii, Themeda triandra, Aristida latifolia, 



Eulalia aurea  and Acacia aneura . A series of sub-types have been identified:

   



Coolibah and mulga (Acacia aneura ) woodland over lignum and tussock grasses on clay plains 

(Coondewanna Flats and Wanna Munna Flats)

 Priority 3(i)

   



Coolibah woodlands over lignum (Muehlenbeckia florulenta over swamp wandiree (Lake Robinson is the 

only known occurrence)

 Priority 1

   



Coolibah woodland over lignum and silky browntop (Eulalia aurea)  (two occurrences known on Mt Bruce 

Flats)


 Priority 1

Threats: dewatering and grazing, clearing associated with infrastructure corridors. 

21

Four plant assemblages of the Wona Land System

(previously ‘Cracking clays of the Chichester and Mungaroona Range’)

A system of basalt upland gilgai plains with tussock grasslands occurs throughout the Chichester Range in the 

Chichester-Millstream National Park, Mungaroona Range Nature Reserve and on adjacent pastoral leases. 

There are a series of community types identified within the Wona Land System gilgai plains that are 

considered susceptible to known threats such as grazing or have constituent rare/restricted species, as follows:

       



Cracking clays of the Chichester and Mungaroona Range. This grassless plain of stony gibber community 

occurs on the tablelands with very little vegetative cover during the dry season, however during the wet a suite 

of ephemerals/annuals and short-lived perennials emerge, many of which are poorly known and range-end 

taxa.


Priority 1

       



Annual Sorghum grasslands on self mulching clays. This community appears very rare and restricted to 

the Pannawonica-Robe valley end of Chichester Range.

Priority 1

       



Mitchell grass plains (Astrebela  spp.) on gilgai

Priority 3(iii)

       


Mitchell grass and Roebourne Plain grass (Eragrostis xerophila ) plain on gilgai (typical type, heavily 

grazed


Priority 3(iii)

22

Tussock grasslands or grassy tall or low shrublands of the Yarcowie Land System (Carnarvon Basin)

Priority 1

Gilgaied soils derived from lower cretaceous benthonitic siltstone on nearly flat plains that support tussock 

grasslands or grassy tall or low shrublands. Land system has very restricted distribution.

Threats: over grazing

23

Triodia  sp. Robe River assemblages of mesas of the West Pilbara  (previously named ‘Triodia  sp. Robe 

River assemblages of mesas of the Robe Valley’)

Priority 3(iii)

This community is typically restricted to mesas and cordillo landforms where the plant assemblages are 

dominated by or contain Triodia  sp. Robe River and are indicative of inverted landscapes; that is, where 

Triodia  sp. Robe River occurs in combination with species that are considered ‘out-of-context’ from their 

normal habitat. The community is a combination of Triodia  sp. Robe River with Acacia pruinocarpa, A. 



citrinoviridis  on slopes or peaks of mesas. These two Acacias  are generally found associated with Pilbara 

creeklines, and their occurrence is probably indicative of the genesis of the mesa surfaces in wetlands, then 

erosion of the landscape and ‘inversion of the landscape’ such that the mesa slopes and peaks that were 

previously low in the landscape become high points. 

Threats: Mining and associated infrastructure

24

Stony saline plains of the Mosquito Land System

Priority 3(iii)


Described as saltbush community of the duplex plains - Mosquito Creek series (Nullagine). Known to contain 

two endemic Acacias. One occurrence known on stony plains, and one on rocky ground. 

Threats: preferential grazing, prospecting and mining, increasing erosion

25

Vegetation of sand dunes of the Hamersley Range/Fortescue Valley (previously 'Fortescue Valley Sand 



Dunes')

Priority 3(iii)

These red linear iron-rich sand dunes lie on the Divide Land system at the junction of the Hamersley Range 

and Fortescue Valley, between Weeli Wolli Creek and the low hills to the west. A small number are vegetated 

with Acacia dictyophleba  scattered tall shrubs over Crotalaria cunninghamii, Trichodesma zeylanicum  var. 

grandiflorum  open shrubland. They are regionally rare, small and fragile and highly susceptible to threatening 

processes. 

Threats: weed invasion especially buffel grass, grazing by cattle, too frequent fire, erosion and impacts of 

mining.


26

Riparian vegetation including phreatophytic species associated with creek lines and watercourses of 

Rudall River

Priority 3(ii)

Semi permanent pools along courses of Rudall River.

Threatsweed invasion, altered hydrological flows, inappropriate fire regimes.

27

Horseflat land system of the Roebourne Plains

Priority 3(iii)

(Does not include priority ecological communities ‘Roebourne Plains gilgai grasslands’ and the ‘Chenopod 

association of the Roebourne Plains area’)

The Horseflat Land System of the Roebourne Plains are extensive, weakly gilgaied clay plains dominated by 

tussock grasslands on mostly alluvial non-gilgaied, red clay loams or heavy clay loams. Perennial tussock 

grasses include Eragrostis xerophila  (Roebourne Plains grass) and other Eragrostis  spp., Eriachne  spp. and 

Dichanthium  spp. The community also supports a suite of annual grasses including Sorghum  spp. and rare 

Astrebela  spp. The community extends from Cape Preston to Balla Balla surrounding the towns of Karratha 

and Roebourne.

This community incorporates Unit 3 (Gilgai plains), Unit 5 (Alluvial Plains) with some Unit 7 (Drainage 

Depressions) described in Van Vreeswyk et al . 2004. 

Threats: grazing, weed invasion, fragmentation

28

Invertebrate assemblages (Errawallana Spring type) Coolawanya Station

Priority 4(ii)

Geologically distinct. Sherlock River system. Permanent spring-fed creek. Has atypical invertebrate 

community. 

Threats: grazing.  

29

Invertebrate assemblages (Nyeetberry Pool type) 

Priority 4(ii)

Jimmawurrada Creek. Nyeetberry pool, Robe River.

Permanent River Pool in the Pilbara (groundwater fed). Blind isopod collected from this site. 

Threats: mining and feral animals 

30

Stygofaunal communities of the Western Fortescue Plains freshwater aquifer (Previously named 

‘Stygofaunal communities of the Millstream freshwater aquifer’) 

Priority 4(ii)

A unique assemblage of subterranean invertebrate fauna. 

Threats: Groundwater drawdown and salinisation. 



KIMBERLEY

1

Perched spring-fed peat-based swamps on hillslopes of the Durack Range area

Priority 1

Assemblages of spring-fed wetlands on organic substrates perched on sandstone hill-slopes in the Central 

Kimberley bioregion. Drainage lines are vegetated with a forest of Corymbia ptychocarpa  (swamp 

bloodwood), Grevillea pteridifolia, Melaleuca  spp, Pandanus spiralis , and some Livistona  spp. over the fern 



Cyclosorus interruptus  and the climbing fern Lygodium microphyllum . Sedges occur in the understorey and 

clumps of Reed Grass Arundinella nepalensis  are dominant in the understorey where the canopy is more 

open. Also associated with the drainage lines are swamps vegetated by dense sedgelands with grasses and 

herbs.


Threats: Cattle grazing and weeds.

2

Assemblages of Point Spring rainforest swamp

Priority 1

Closed canopy rainforest on freshwater swamps on alluvial floodplain soils in the east Kimberley. At Point 

Spring the canopy is 17m high and the dominant tree species include Canarium australianum, Carallia 

brachiata, Euodia elleryana, Ficus racemosa, F. virens  and Terminalia sericocarpa 

Threats: Invasion by feral fish, impacts of stock, climate change and rising sea levels.

3

Assemblages of the wetlands associated with the organic mound springs on the tidal mudflats of the 

Victoria-Bonaparte Bioregion

Priority 1

East Kimberley (i.e. Brolga Spring, King Gordon Spring, Attack Spring, Long Swamp etc on Carlton Hill 

Station). Large wetlands with Melaleuca forest with small patches of rainforest on central mounds. Rainforest 

and paperbark forest associated with mound springs and seepage areas of the Victoria Bonaparte coastal lands.

4

Monsoon vine thickets and Camaenid land snails of limestone ranges (Napier Range)

Priority 1

Unusual vine thicket community and Camaenid land snails assemblage located on Napier Range.



Threats: frequent fires leading to vegetation changes; loss of vine thickets and leaf litter 

5

Oryza australiensis  (wild rice) grasslands on alluvial flats of the Ord River 

Priority 1

West side of Weaber Hills, Weaber Plain, Mantini Flats, Knox Creek. 

6

Inland Mangrove (Avicennia marina ) community of Salt Creek

Priority 1

Anna Plains Station, Mandora. 

7

Plant assemblages on vertical sandstone surfaces

Priority 1

Eg. Two undescribed spinifex spp. at Bungles and Molly Spring, foxtail spinifex at Cathedral Gorge and 

Thompsons Spring. Fire sensitive plants, fire regimes a threat.

8

Invertebrate community of Napier Range Cave 

Priority 1

On Old Napier Downs, Karst No. KNI.  

Threats: Mine close by and tourist visitation.  

9

Invertebrate assemblages of the cliff foot springs around Devonian reef system

Priority 1

Black soils. 

Threats: Springs drying up due to dewatering of karst systems.

10

Dwarf pindan heath community of Broome coast

Priority 1

Occurs between the racecourse and Gantheame Point lighthouse. Insufficient survey outside of Broome 

townsite area to determine full extent.

Threats: clearing, trampling, weed invasion, inappropriate fire regimes

11

Corymbia paractia  dominated community on dunes

Priority 1



Corymbia  paractia  behind dunes, Broome township area, Dampier Peninsula. Transition zone where coastal 

dunes (with vine thickets) merge with Pindan (desert) vegetation. Also, port north of Broome.

Threats: clearing, trampling, weed invasion, inappropriate fire regimes

12



Yüklə 0,62 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə