Quantum Computing: How to Address the National Security Risk


 Quantum Computing: A Serious National Security Threat



Yüklə 351,36 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/23
tarix02.01.2022
ölçüsü351,36 Kb.
#47890
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   23
Quantum-National-Security-Risk

1. Quantum Computing: A Serious National Security Threat

 

he development of quantum technology is not merely a scientific and economic 



consideration but also a strategic national security concern because a quantum 

computer will be able to hack into and disrupt nearly all current information 

technology. Both the national security risks and the economic benefits necessitate 

that the U.S. win the race to the world’s first fully operational quantum computer. 

How will quantum computers be able to hack into today’s seemingly secure 

encryption?  

All current computers, even supercomputers, use electrical signals to process data in 

a linear sequence of “bits,” where each bit is either a one or a zero. This classical 

system of ones and zeros is referred to as the binary system.

3

 



Quantum computers, however, operate using a quantum bit, or qubit, and each qubit 

is a physical photon, rather than an electrical signal. In the bizarre world of quantum 

mechanics, these photons can be in two states at once, essentially functioning as a 

zero and a one at the same time. This allows a quantum computer to do two—or 

more—computations at once. Add more qubits, and the computing speed grows 

exponentially. These quantum physical properties will allow quantum computers to 

solve problems thousands of times faster than today’s fastest supercomputers.

4

  



The key advantage over classical computers, however, isn’t in the quantum 

computer’s speed of operations but its ability to dramatically reduce the number of 

operations needed to get to a result. This increased computing power poses a problem 

for asymmetric encryption, the encryption schema used to protect nearly all of today’s 

electronic data. Asymmetric encryption is secure because it is based on math 

problems that would take a classical computer centuries to solve.  

For example, asymmetric encryption—often called public-key encryption—relies on 

two keys. One is the private key, which consists of two large prime numbers known 

only to the party securing the data (for example, a bank). The public key sits in 

cyberspace and is the product of multiplying together the two private primes to create 

a semiprime. The only way a hacker could access such encrypted credit card 

information would be by factorizing or breaking down the large public key—often 600 

digits or longer—back to the correct two numbers of the private key. This task simply 

takes too long for current computers because they must sequentially explore the 

potential solutions to a mathematical problem.

5

 



3

 F. Arnold Romberg, “Computers and the Binary System,” in Mathematics, 2nd ed., ed. Mary Rose 

Bonk, vol. 1 (Farmington Hills, MI: Macmillan Reference USA, 2016), 159–65.  

4

 Arthur Herman, “The Computer That Could Rule the World,” Wall Street Journal, October 27, 2017, 



https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-computer-that-could-rule-the-world-1509143922. 

5

 Ibid. 






Arthur Herman & Idalia Friedson 

Meanwhile, a quantum system is able to look at every potential solution 

simultaneously and generate answers—not just the single “best answer,” but nearly 

ten thousand close alternatives as well—in less than a second. This is roughly the 

equivalent of being able to read every book in the Library of Congress simultaneously 

in order to find the one that answers a specific question.

6

 

Why is a quantum computer so dangerous? 



The danger lies in the sheer enormity of critical information that is now protected by 

such asymmetric encryption, including bank and credit card information, email 

communications, military networks and weapons systems, self-driving cars, the 

power grid, artificial intelligence (AI), and more. While asymmetric encryption is 

effective at thwarting today’s hackers armed with classical computers, quantum 

computers will be able to hack into these systems and disrupt their operation and/or 

steal protected data.  

Experts like to refer to the day that a universal quantum computer will be able to hack 

into asymmetric encryption as “Q-Day” or “Y2Q”—reminiscent of the Y2K computer 

meltdown that was thankfully avoided due to the hard work of technologists.  

In addition, a quantum computer attack could be virtually impossible to detect 

because the combination of the available public key with the quantum-deciphered 

private key would allow a hacker to impersonate someone in the targeted system. 

Therefore, someone within the hacked network would have to notice unusual internal 

activity in order to detect a hack—and even then, it would be difficult to determine if 

the disruptive activity is the result of a quantum computer attack or another type of 

cyberattack.  

By any measure, then, a quantum computer, which will be able to hack into 

asymmetric encryption, poses an obvious national security threat. At its worst, Q-Day 

could be the equivalent of a quantum Pearl Harbor—especially because a large 

proportion of American infrastructure systems are operated electronically, including 

the grid, water purification and transportation systems, and traffic light and railroad 

systems. Even more alarmingly, it would be a stealth Pearl Harbor that no one would 

detect until it was too late.  

Because there is not a succinct term to refer to a future large-scale quantum computer 

that can hack into asymmetric encryption, at Hudson Institute’s Quantum Alliance 

Initiative (QAI) policy center, we refer to such a computer as a quantum prime 

computer.

7

 As discussed later in this section, estimates vary regarding when a 



quantum prime computer will be built.  

6

 Ibid. 



7

 To be precise, a quantum prime computer is one that can reverse-factor large semi-prime numbers 

used in asymmetric encryption back to their original prime numbers, or keys. These keys unlock the 

protected data.  




Quantum Computing: How to Address the National Security Risk 

Because subatomic particles are inherently unstable, keeping sufficient numbers of 



qubits entangled long enough to do calculations is exceedingly difficult. Physicists call 

this inherent instability decoherence. When a given qubit decoheres, it loses its 

superposition and can no longer act as both zero and one at the same time, but only 

one or the other. The ability to compute in the way a quantum calculation requires 

therefore disappears. Unfortunately for quantum scientists, the slightest disturbance 

can cause a qubit to decohere; this means engineers must constantly work on ways to 

mitigate the effects of minute disruptions from the slightest movement, sound, or 

even light. This is also why many quantum computers are built inside vacuums and 

deep subzero temperatures.

8

  



All this means that major breakthroughs in quantum computing technology come 

very slowly and take considerable investment in time, money, and human resources. 

Achieving the ultimate breakthrough to a quantum prime computer will be the 

slowest of all, and some experts say that it may not happen before 2030.

9

  

All the same, though a quantum prime computer may still be years off, a significant 



breakthrough in quantum computing is likely less than a year or two out on the 

horizon: quantum supremacy. 




Yüklə 351,36 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   23




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə