Ranslational and



Yüklə 0,77 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/3
tarix04.01.2017
ölçüsü0,77 Mb.
#4445
1   2   3

To test the allostimulatory or inhibitory effect of MSCs on T-cell

proliferation, we co-cultured phytohemagglutin (PHA)-stimulated

MNCs derived from healthy human buffy coat preparations with

decreasing numbers of MSCs. Specifically, 1

 10


4

, 5


 10

3

, and



2.5

 10


3

MSCs were preseeded as quadruplicates into wells of a

flat-bottom 96-well plate in Roswell Park Memorial Institute

1640 (PAA) medium containing 10% FBS. On the following day,

the medium was discarded, and 1

 10


5

MNCs were added to each

well in RPMI medium containing 10% FBS and interleukin-2 (IL-

2; 20 U/ml

¼ 0.01 lg/ml; Roche Applied Science, Mannheim,

Germany, http://www.roche-applied-science.com). One half of the

wells were stimulated with PHA (2.5

lg/ml PHA-L; Roche

Applied Science) to induce T-cell proliferation. Controls included

nonstimulated, co-cultured MNCs, nonstimulated MNCs, and

stimulated MNCs without MSC co-culture. To simultaneously

quantify the cell number, viability, phenotype, and activation level

of T-cell subsets, we used a modified method established by

Nguyen et al. [32]. CD3, CD4, and CD8 antibodies were used to

distinguish T-cell subsets, whereas T-cell activation was measured

by the assessment of CD71 expression. For T-cell quantification,

fluorescent microparticles with defined concentrations were used.

The absolute count of target cells was calculated on the basis of

the known bead concentrations using the following equation:

Total cells per microliter

¼

Numbers of cells measured



Number of fluorespheres measured







 Flow count concentration:

After 5 days, the MNCs were harvested and stained with a

cocktail of the following reagents: flow-count fluorospheres

(Beckmann Coulter) to directly determine absolute cell counts,

anti-CD3-PE-Cy7 (Becton Dickinson GmbH), anti-CD4-PE (Bec-

ton


Dickinson

GmbH),


anti-CD8-FITC

(Becton


Dickinson

GmbH), anti-CD71-APC (Becton Dickinson GmbH), and 7-AAD

(Beckmann Coulter) to exclude dead cells. The samples were an-

alyzed using the FACS-Canto II and DIVA software. The per-

centage of inhibition of T cells was calculated by comparing con-

trol cultures stimulated with PHA in the absence of MSCs (

¼0%

inhibition) to those in the presence of MSCs.



We used BM-MSC samples from three donors cultured in the

differing supplements. Because of the fact that, in two HS-MSC

cultures, T cells showed reduced viability (

<70%) in unstimu-

lated co-cultures because of unknown reasons, data for HS-MSCs

were not statistically evaluated.

Detection of Telomerase Activity

To detect potential telomerase activity, we used the Telo TAGGG

Telomerase PCR ELISA (Roche Applied Science) following the

manufacturer’s instructions. Samples of BM aspirates and BM-

MSCs at different passages cultured in the various supplements

were analyzed. Samples were regarded as telomerase negative if

the difference in absorbance after subtraction of the negative con-

trol was

<0.2.

Human Cytokine Expression Profile

The cytokine profile of culture medium supplemented with 10%

FBS, HS, tPRP, or pHPL and that of 3-day MSC-conditioned me-

dium was analyzed with a semiquantitative human cytokine anti-

body array that can detect 174 cytokines per experiment (RayBio

Human Cytokine Antibody Array G series 2000; Tebu-bio

GmbH, Berlin, Germany, http://www.tebu-bio.com). To minimize

variances, tPRP and pHPL were derived from the same initial

platelet concentrates.

Despite the human specificity of the array, we also tested

FBS, but finally interpreted only the conditioned medium. All

sample measurements were performed in duplicate according to

the manufacturer’s instructions. The signals were detected using a

laser scanner (GMS 418 array scanner; Affymetrix, Santa Clara,

CA, USA, http://www.affymetrix.com) and analyzed with array

vision version 7 (Imaging Research, Inc., St. Catharines, Canada,

http://www.imagingresearch.com). Signals were normalized using

positive, negative and internal controls included on the array. For

analysis, the internal negative controls were used to determine

the cut-off rate for a positive signal as 2

 SD. Thus, signal in-

tensity values of

>2,000 were regarded as positive.

Statistical Analysis

Statistical tests were performed using SPSS 12.0 (SPSS, Inc.,

Chicago, IL, USA, http://www.spss.com) or SigmaPlot 11.0

(Systat Software, Inc., San Jose, CA, USA, http://www.systat.

com) statistical software. Data are represented as arithmetic mean

Æ SD. Data were tested for normality and equal variance before

analysis. Statistical differences were calculated using analysis of

variance (ANOVA; or ANOVA on ranks if equal variance testing

failed) and

t test (paired t test where applicable). Differences

were considered significant at *,

p < .05 or **, p < .01.

2334

Human Alternatives to FBS for BM-MSC Expansion



R

ESULTS


MSCs Isolation and Expansion

Effect of Isolation Strategies. Because our previous experi-

ments with AT-MSCs resulted in a transient contamination with

hematopoietic cells in human supplement cultures, we applied

two MSC enrichment strategies. First, we depleted mature line-

age marker expressing cells by rosetting to erythrocytes (Roset-

teSep). Second, we used magnetic combined with flow cytomet-

ric sorting of CD271-expressing cells to enrich MSCs.

Both enrichment strategies reduced contaminating round

and loosely adherent cells in the primary passage (Fig. 1).

Ficoll gradient-derived cultures supplemented with FBS had

experientially few contaminating cells indicated by the pres-

ence of small loosely adherent round cells reactive with anti-

CD45 (data not shown). These cells were easily depleted by

repetitive media changes that occurred in the primary culture.

RosetteSep very efficiently depleted the round contaminat-

ing cells in all culture conditions and yielded MSCs to be pas-

saged 11.2

Æ 1.48 days after seeding compared with 15.42 Æ

4.46 days after seeding for Ficoll/FBS, respectively (

p ¼ .01;

Fig. 2). A more rapid proliferation was observed by p3. How-

ever, this did not correlate with higher cumulative population

doublings. Up to p3 expansion kinetics of RosetteSep-

enriched cells showed a higher proliferation. Interestingly,

immunodepleted cells from some donors showed an earlier

onset of replicative senescence compared with Ficoll-isolated

cells from p4 on, indicated by reduced proliferation and mor-

phologic changes. We observed differences in the effects of

HS and tPRP on RosetteSep-enriched cultures. The cell incre-

ment in HS exceeded that of ficolled cells up to p4 (Fig. 2).

Proliferation rates were accelerated in HS, with a significant

increase only in p1.

FBS-supplemented cultures sorted for CD271

þ

cells


showed bacterial contamination in three of four cases. This

necessitated the abandonment of said cultures. Despite the

addition of the same concentration of penicillin/streptomycin,

parallel cultures using the human alternatives displayed no

bacterial outgrowth. This may suggest that human FBS alter-

natives might have intrinsic antibacterial components.

In summary, the experiments with CD271

þ

cells cultured



in FBS, HS, or tPRP showed that CD271

þ

cells tended to



grow in colonies during the entire culture period, never form-

ing confluent monolayers. Expansion kinetics were delayed in

FBS-driven cultures of CD271

þ

cells after p3 (Fig. 2). This



corresponded to the low cell numbers yielded within each

passage. Cells stopped proliferation in p5 yielding maximum

24.91 CPD for FBS (

n ¼ 1; 17.47 for HS, p4, n ¼ 1 and

21.92 for tPRP, p5,

n ¼ 1).


Effect of Supplements. As indicated above, the culturing of

MNCs after density gradient centrifugation in FBS-supple-

mented medium yielded few contaminating hematopoietic

cells. In contrast, supplementing MNCs with HS or tPRP

resulted in variably high numbers of hematopoietic cells.

Interestingly, and unlike HS and tPRP, pHPL-supplemented

cultures were devoid of contaminating cells (Fig. 1).

Calculating the number of CFU-Fs showed a precursor

frequency of 1:25,000 MSCs/MNCs, which was not affected

Figure 2.

Effect of isolation strategies. (Top) Mean cumulative population doublings of bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells isolated using

Ficoll gradient centrifugation, RosetteSep, or CD271 sorting followed by plastic adhesion in medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum,

human serum, or pooled thrombin-activated platelet-rich-plasma. (Bottom) Cumulative days needed for each MSC culture to be passaged. Low

numerical values indicate high proliferative activity (for initial

n, see Fig. 1B). *In comparison to Ficoll, p < .05 using analysis of variance and

paired


t test. Abbreviations: FBS, fetal bovine serum; HS, pooled human serum; tPRP, pooled thrombin-activated platelet-rich-plasma.

Bieback, Hecker, Kocao¨mer et al.

2335

www.StemCells.com



by the use of different culture substitutes. However, the num-

ber of cells composing the colonies was larger in all of the

human supplements. Colonies in pHPL were densely packed

with very small spindle-shaped cells compared with only

loosely connected cells in FBS cultures (Fig. 3).

The comparison of the expansion rates of MSCs in FBS to

either HS- or tPRP-supplemented culture conditions showed no

significant differences (Fig. 4). However, cells cultured in HS

and tPRP decelerated proliferation from p4, reaching 14.46

Æ

3.46 (HS,



n ¼ 3) and 18.47 Æ 2.92 CPD (tPRP, n ¼ 7) com-

pared with 18.73

Æ 1.96 CPD (FBS, n ¼ 13). This correlated

well with an increased population doubling time. Beginning in

p1, the generation time of ficolled MSCs cultured in HS was

significantly prolonged with 3.41

Æ 1.23 days compared with

2.51


Æ 0.87 days in the FBS cultures. In p4, both HS and tPRP

showed an extended generation time (12.53

Æ 6.54 days for HS

and 12.72

Æ 7.39 days for tPRP) compared with FBS (3.72 Æ

0.44 days). Cells from one donor (HS) or two donors (tPRP)

expanded until p5. In contrast, 11 samples from a total of 14

donors cultured in FBS reached p5.

Consistently, cultures supplemented with pHPL yielded sig-

nificantly higher expansion rates than cells in FBS, reaching a

maximum of 52.82 CPD (in p8;

n ¼ 1 from initially six donors)

compared with 31.43

Æ 3.13 in FBS (in p7; n ¼ 8 from initially

14 donors,

p ¼ .004). Calculating the generation time at p1 and

p4 yielded, in both cases, significantly reduced population dou-

bling times: 1.27

Æ 0.23 days in p1 and 1.9 Æ 0.32 days in p4

compared with FBS (2.51

Æ 0.87 days in p1 and 3.72 Æ 0.44

days in p4;

p ¼ .012 and p ¼ .004, respectively).

MSC Quality and Functionality

Immune Phenotype. Typical CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105,

CD146, and HLA-ABC surface marker expression was

detected in all MSC cultures at p3 despite a measurable donor

variance. CD29 was expressed on 44.46

Æ 9.49% of BM-

MSCs cultured in tPRP, whereas the other supplement yielded

significantly higher positivity; for example, in HS, 98.12

Æ

0.76%. CD29 mean fluorescence intensity was significantly



higher in HS (FBS, 967.38

Æ 476.55; HS, 2,176.07 Æ 416.98;

tPRP, 134.57

Æ 19.18; pHPL, 438.88 Æ 306.06). CD15,

CD33, lineage (CD45, CD3, CD235a, CD14, and CD19),

CD117, CD144, and HLA-DR showed less than 5% positiv-

ity. Selected antigens representing one donor are depicted in

Figure 5. No further statistically significant differences

between FBS and the other supplements were detected.

Figure 3.

Colony-forming unit-fibroblast of bone marrow (BM)-mes-

enchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Photomicrographs represent BM-

MSCs from one donor assessed after 10 days cultivated in fetal bovine

serum, pooled human serum, pooled thrombin-activated platelet-rich-

plasma, or pooled human platelet lysate (magnification,

Â100). Abbre-

viations: FBS, fetal bovine serum; HS, pooled human serum; tPRP,

pooled thrombin-activated platelet-rich-plasma; pHPL, pooled human

platelet lysate.

Figure 4.

Effect of supplements. (Top) Mean cumulative population

doublings of bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) iso-

lated using Ficoll gradient centrifugation and cultivation either in fetal

bovine serum (FBS), pooled human serum, pooled thrombin-activated

platelet-rich-plasma, or pooled human platelet lysate. (Middle) Cumu-

lative days needed for each MSC culture to be passaged (for initial

n,

see Fig. 1B). (Bottom) Generation time of MSCs at p1 (black) and p4



(white) (

n ¼ 4). *p < .05 and **p < .01 in comparison to FBS using

analysis of variance (ANOVA) or ANOVA on the ranks, respectively.

Abbreviations: FBS, fetal bovine serum; HS, pooled human serum;

tPRP, pooled thrombin-activated platelet-rich-plasma; pHPL, pooled

human platelet lysate; CPD, cumulative population doublings.

2336

Human Alternatives to FBS for BM-MSC Expansion



Other markers showed donor-dependent variable reactivity

perhaps influenced by the supplement used and/or the degree

of hematopoietic cell contamination: CD31 (FBS, 0.95

Æ 0.74;


HS, 0.71

Æ 0.31; tPRP, 5.5 Æ 4.48; pHPL, 19.12 Æ 10.78),

CD133 (FBS, 6.45

Æ 11.23; HS, 5.14 Æ 7.21; tPRP, 6.04 Æ

5.94; pHPL, 0.77

Æ 0. 89), and CD106 (FBS, 6.18 Æ 7.91; HS,

8.35

Æ 9.7; tPRP, 13.54 Æ 14.34; pHPL, 18.28 Æ 9.41).



Differentiation Potential. MSCs derived from all conditions

demonstrated differentiation toward the osteogenic and adipo-

genic lineage as assessed by von Kossa and Oil Red O stain-

ing (supporting information Fig. 1).

Inhibition of PHA-Induced T-Cell Proliferation

We used a flow cytometric method to simultaneously quantify

mitogen-driven T-cell proliferation, subtypes, activation level,

and viability. T-cell stimulation by PHA led to strong prolif-

eration and activation. To study the impact of culture condi-

tions on MSC inhibitory activity, the same donor MNCs were

used for all MSC samples. In co-culture controls without add-

ing PHA, MSCs did not induce an alloreaction of the T cells

but rather a loss of T cells in the range of 10-20% compared

with the control. All MSCs independent of the culture condi-

tions inhibited the PHA-driven T-cell proliferation and activa-

tion dose dependently (Fig. 6). Both CD4

þ

and CD8


þ

T-cell


subsets were similarly affected. MSCs cultured in the human

platelet-derived substitutes showed a tendency toward aggra-

vated inhibitory activity at ratios of 1:10 and 1:20 that was

not statistically significant.

Telomerase Activity

Telomerase activity was analyzed in MSCs at different pas-

sages to control the onset of spontaneous immortalization. We

never detected telomerase activity except for the primary BM.

Figure 5.

Flow cytometric char-

acterization of bone marrow (BM)-

mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs).

Comparison of the expression of

surface proteins of ficolled BM-

MSCs

cultured


in

fetal


bovine

serum,


pooled

human


serum,

pooled thrombin-activated platelet-

rich-plasma, or pooled human plate-

let lysate analyzed by flow cytome-

try. One representative donor and

typical


MSC

marker


expression

are depicted in the overlay to the

unstained/control. For statistical an-

alyses,


n ¼ 3 BM-MSC donors

were paired assessed at passage 3.

Abbreviations: FBS, fetal bovine

serum; HS, pooled human serum;

tPRP,

pooled


thrombin-activated

platelet-rich-plasma; pHPL, pooled

human platelet lysate.

Bieback, Hecker, Kocao¨mer et al.

2337

www.StemCells.com



Here we could attribute the low telomerase activity to the

CD34


þ

proportion (data not shown).

Cytokine Content in Supplements

and Conditioned Medium

The cytokine content in the 10% supplemented media and the

conditioned media (CM) after 3 days of culture was eval-

uated. For these analyses, tPRP and pHPL were derived from

the same pools to eliminate donor-specific differences.

Because the cytokine array is human specific, data for the

FBS-containing medium were not interpreted (Fig. 7; support-

ing information Table 1).

Overall growth factor levels in FBS-CM were lower than

in any of the human supplemented cultures, indicating that

detectable levels are continuously present in the human sup-

plements and remain unchanged including Acrp30 (adiponec-

tin), angiogenin, CD14, glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis

factor receptor (GITR), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)

AB, and sgp130 (soluble gp130). Other cytokine levels

dropped during culture (because of consumption or degrada-

tion) such as epidermal growth factor, macrophage-derived

chemokine/CCL22, pulmonary and activation-regulated che-

mokine, PDGF-AA, and PDGF-BB. Insulin-like growth factor

binding protein (IGFBP)-3, interleukin 6, monocyte chemoat-

tractant protein-1, macrophage stimulating protein (MSP)

a,

osteoprotegerin, thrombopoietin, and tissue inhibitor of metal-



loproteinases-1 and -2 levels increased during culture, pre-

sumably because of production by MSCs.

tPRP differed from HS and pHPL with regard to a variety

of cytokines. In tPRP-CM, hepatocyte growth factor/scatter

factor, IGFBP-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor

(VEGF) D were elevated. Unfortunately, no obvious candidate

for the strong proliferative support from pHPL could be iden-

tified: basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), GITR, macro-

phage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), macrophage inflam-

matory protein-1

b (MIP-1b), MSP-a, regulated on activation,

normal T-cell expressed, and secreted (RANTES; CCL-5),

and VEGF were differentially regulated in pHPL/pHPL-CM

compared with HS/HS-CM and tPRP/tPRP-CM.

Figure

6.

Immunomodulatory



capacity of bone marrow (BM)-

mesenchymal

stromal

cells


(MSCs). BM-MSCs, irrespective

of the supplement, mediated a

dose-dependent

inhibition

of

phytohemagglutin-induced T-cell/



CD3 stimulation. Proliferation of

the CD4 (T-helper) and CD8

(cytotoxic) subsets were simi-

larly


affected.

Simultaneously,

we quantified the proportion of

activated T cells by means of

CD71 expression. Like T-cell

proliferation,

T-cell

activation



was inhibited dose dependently.

The


overlay

depicts


CD71

expression of CD3

þ

cells. The



same buffy coat mononuclear

cells were used for all experi-

ments. Three MSC batches were

paired assessed at passage 3.

Dose dependent differences were

observed compared to ratio 1:10

with

p < .05 (* ¼ fetal bovine



serum (FBS), #

¼ thrombin-acti-

vated platelet releasate in plasma

(

þPRP) and $ ¼ pooled human



platelety lysate (pHPL)). tPRP-

and pHPL MSCs-induced CD3

(plus CD4 for tPRP MSCs and

CD8 for pHPL MSCs) inhibition

did not differ significantly from

that at 1:10. Statistically reduced

inhibition was found at the ratio

1:40. A paired

t test was used to

compare dose dependency and

analysis of variance to compare

culture supplements.

2338

Human Alternatives to FBS for BM-MSC Expansion



D

ISCUSSION

Currently, the ex vivo expansion of MSCs seems to be inevi-

tably to get the common therapeutic dose of

>2 Â 10

6

/kg



body weight for infusion (e.g., in treatment of graft vs. host

disease). Also, for other indications, there exists a need to

study the applicability of MSCs with dose escalation, indicat-

ing the need to propagate MSCs in sufficient quantity.

In a recent concise review in this

Journal, Manello and

Tonti underlined that elaboration of a culture medium for the

production of MSCs for clinical application still remains a

crucial matter [12]. We and others [2-4, 14-24, 27, 33-38]

have since developed various protocols for the clinical scale

propagation of human MSCs. Most of these protocols actually

avoid the use of animal serum and some get rid off antibiotics

and density gradient separation of the culture initiating cells.

The major limitation of these studies relates to the fact that

they compare FBS-based media to only selected FBS-free cul-

ture conditions (only HS or only pHPL). There are some data

indicating that autologous serum in general supports greater

amplification of MSCs than FBS [14, 39]. Limited availability

and high variability regarding MSC growth clearly hamper

the clinical applicability of autologous serum for large-scale

MSCs production. Pooled preparations of allogeneic human

serum can be produced in large amounts for pharmaceutical

manufacturing and are easily controlled for quality according

to blood banking standards (one batch

¼ 25 blood donors;

produced in the Institute of Clinical and Experimental Trans-

fusion Medicine, University Hospital Tu¨bingen, Tu¨bingen,


Kataloq: 2015
2015 -> Oitsning ma’nosi – Orttirilgan Immunitet Tanqisligi Sindromi. Bu dahshatli va bedavo kasallik hozirgi zamonning “vabosi” deb yuritiladi
2015 -> 4 İstehlakçıların davranışının modelləşdirilməsi Son istehlakçıların davranışının modelləşdirilməsi
2015 -> Klinik protokol Az ərbaycan Respublikas
2015 -> Üz–çənə cərrahiyyəsi Bölmə Gicgah-çənə oynağının xəstəlikləri və zədələnmələri 1 Çənə oynağının çıxığının əsas səbəbi nədir?
2015 -> Üz–çənə cərrahiyyəsi Bölmə Gicgah-çənə oynağının xəstəlikləri və zədələnmələri 1 Çənə oynağının çıxığının əsas səbəbi nədir?
2015 -> Stomatologiya 1 Sistem hipoplaziyası zamanı hansı dişlər zədələnir?
2015 -> Приложение №3 Информированное согласие пациента на пародонтологическое лечение
2015 -> Myuller h p parodontologiya pdf
2015 -> Buklet Azərbaycan Respublikası Prezidentinin 2011-ci il 7 iyul tarixli

Yüklə 0,77 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə