Ranslational and



Yüklə 0,77 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/3
tarix04.01.2017
ölçüsü0,77 Mb.
#4445
1   2   3

Germany). However, studies investigating the effects of allo-

geneic serum on BM-MSCs are contradictory [24, 28, 36, 40].

Alternatively, tPRP requires a complicated manufacturing

process [27]. pHPL, in contrast, can be produced by simple

freeze thaw cycles from the standard blood product buffy

coat-derived pooled platelet concentrates. A further advantage

is the possible use of platelet concentrates after their expiry

period of 4-5 days. The freeze-thaw process furthermore

allows for quarantine storage, potentially leading to a larger

batch representing 40 donors. Based on a previously devel-

oped GMP-compliant large-scale protocol, a volume of 200

ml pHPL would be sufficient for one clinical scale BM-MSC

expansion [4]. Thus, one batch of pHPL may be sufficient to

expand MSCs from 10-20 patients.

Based on these results, we performed a comprehensive

comparison of four standardized culture protocols together

with three initial MSC enrichment modalities to define opti-

mized clinical scale MSC culture conditions. We selected one

commercially available, pretested FBS batch, analyzed as

being superior to other batches.

Our results showed for the first time that MSC population

doublings and expansion kinetics were significantly enhanced

in pHPL-supplemented BM-MSC cultures compared with cul-

tures supplemented with selected FBS, HS, or tPRP. Using

pooled HS (or tPRP) exerted comparable expansion kinetics

in early passage BM-MSCs like the pretested FBS batch.

Clinically relevant numbers of MSCs could be obtained

within a maximum of three passages with HS or tPRP, equiv-

alent to FBS cultures. These numbers could certainly be

obtained within the first to second passage in pHPL-supple-

mented cultures. Compared with AT-MSCs, pHPL, but not

HS or tPRP, consistently surpassed FBS in expanding BM-

MSCs. Cell yields in terms of CFU were maintained.

No change in the cellular quality and potency was

obvious. No lot-to-lot variability of pHPL and no variability

between two manufacturing sites, Graz and Mannheim, were

observed. This is in contrast to findings with FBS, where only

selected lots are appropriate for MSC expansion [19]. Interest-

ingly, in AT-MSCs, pHPL at a concentration of 10% did not

allow the expansion of AT-derived cells beyond p1 [22, 27].

Currently, it is not known why pHPL has a stronger mito-

genic effect than HS and tPRP on BM-MSCs. Activating plate-

lets by thrombin or clotting induces secretion of more than 300

proteins and small molecules [41]. Platelet

a granules are het-

erogeneous and contain either pro- or antiangiogenic factors.

Depending on the mode of activation, release of these granule

contents can be differentially induced [42]. Thus far, it cannot

be excluded that various agonists used for platelet activation

select for a certain platelet growth factor composition. We

detected only a limited number of cytokines as differentially

concentrated in feeding or conditioned medium containing

pHPL compared with HS and tPRP. These include bFGF,

GITR, IGFBP-3, latency associated peptide of TGF

b, MIF,


MIP-1

b, MSP-a, RANTES, VEGF, and all different isoforms

of PDGF. PDGF either as homodimer of the A or B chain or

the AB heterodimer showed the highest concentration in pHPL

(supporting information Table 1). PDGF and bFGF are well-

Figure 7.

Selection of differentially regulated growth factors eval-

uated by human cytokine array. Medium supplemented with either

10% human serum (HS), pooled thrombin-activated platelet-rich-

plasma (tPRP), or pooled human platelet lysate (pHPL), and in addi-

tion 3 days of conditioned medium of fetal bovine serum, HS, tPRP,

and pHPL (each

n ¼ 1) were analysed. Depicted cytokines from a list

of 174 (supporting information Table 1) have been selected based on

noticeable differences in the signal intensities indicating different con-

centrations in medium and conditioned medium. Abbreviations: FBS,

fetal bovine serum; HS, pooled human serum; tPRP, pooled throm-

bin-activated platelet-rich-plasma; pHPL, pooled human platelet

lysate.

Bieback, Hecker, Kocao¨mer et al.



2339

www.StemCells.com



described growth factors for MSCs [36, 43]. In a recent study,

the combination of PDGF, bFGF, and transforming growth fac-

tor

b was sufficient to expand MSCs in a serum-free medium



under laboratory scale conditions [44]. MIP-1

b has recently

been attributed to the promotion of fibrosis [45]. Besides stim-

ulatory activities, inhibitory activities might be promoted by

the growth factors present. Also the variety of extracellular

matrix components including fibrin, fibronectin, vitronectin,

and osteonectin may play pivotal roles [46]. In this context, the

modified expression of the fibronectin receptor CD29 (lowest

positivity in tPRP and highest intensity in HS) will be eluci-

dated in further studies. Because of its complexity, multivariate

designs are planned to identify the most relevant components

[47] .


HS, tPRP, and pHPL allowed the isolation of BM-MSCs

with comparable immune phenotype, in vitro functionality

regarding T-cell suppression, and a differentiation potential

like FBS. Focusing on the intended therapeutic application,

additional tests for genomic stability and in vivo differentia-

tion potential will be necessary [4]. Preliminary data by us

and others suggest that autologous serum may even favor

genomic stability compared with FBS [28, 4]. Despite rare

spontaneous transformation events in FBS-cultured MSCs [18,

48, 49], recent data have shown localized genomic instabil-

ities in human BM-MSCs at clinically relevant passages irre-

spective of the serum source used [37, 50]. However, cells in

autologous serum displayed a preserved methylated and

unmethylated state compared with FBS [37]. Related to this,

a recent study suggested that allogeneic AB serum may select

for a more immature MSC phenotype, called mesodermal pro-

genitor cells, which can be induced to differentiate into MSCs

by switching the culture to FBS [38].

Unlike AT-MSCs, hematopoietic contamination was only

detectable in the primary culture of BM-MSCs. In contrast to

previous reports of selecting highly proliferative cells by

enrichment of MSCs by RosetteSep or CD271 sorting [51], in

our study, both strategies were not advantageous in any of the

culture conditions tested. Admittedly, we used standardized

and not method-optimized culture conditions. The addition of

growth factors has been suggested for highly purified precursor

cells that do not get trophic support from other cell types [52].

Culturing cells under different conditions may affect the

secretion of trophic mediators. With the cytokine array

applied, we cannot directly compare medium supplemented

with FBS to the human supplements because of the anti-

human specificity of most antibodies. The response of MSCs

cultured in FBS shows certain differences as described in

detail within the Results. Currently the cytokine array repre-

sents only a preliminary insight into the complex secretome

of MSCs. We have therefore already initiated further studies

to evaluate cytokines that may function as markers to ensure

a quality control of supplement batches and to further monitor

MSC potency and therapeutic efficacy.

Although human components can easily be prepared

according to blood banking standards, there remains the risk

of sensitization by blood group substances or by adventitious

agents not covered by routine blood donor testing. Implemen-

tation of further procedures such as quarantine storage or

pathogen inactivation into a large-scale, GMP-compliant

pHPL manufacturing may ensure the highest possible quality

standards [53].

Our approach is currently limited by the in vitro compari-

son of MSC qualities. Further studies focusing on genomic

stability or lack of transformation and in vivo differentiation

potential, as well as homing capacities, are currently under-

way to show that MSCs isolated and expanded by using

pHPL share properties of FBS-cultured MSCs. The data pub-

lished thus far support maintenance of differentiation and bio-

logic safety, even in vivo [3, 4, 17, 21]. Presently, the first

application of pHPL expanded BM-MSCs has been performed

to treat refractory graft versus host disease [54].

C

ONCLUSION



Our data based on a paired analysis of 14 bone marrow donor

MSCs using three different human alternative supplements

compared with FBS for MSC isolation and expansion indicate

that all tested human supplements support the isolation and

expansion of BM-MSCs comparably to FBS. Human platelet

lysate, however, seems to be the optimal component, assuring

enriched cell numbers, maintained viability, cell identity, pu-

rity, sterility, and potency of BM-MSCs. pHPL favors not

only very rapid but also long-term expansion while maintain-

ing the immune phenotype, differentiation, and immunomodu-

latory capacities. The combined fast, profound, and extended

expansion suggests that the progenitor compartment in pHPL-

supplemented cultures is best preserved.

A

CKNOWLEDGMENTS



We thank Angela Lenzen (H.L.) and Claudia Url (K.S. and D.S.)

for excellent technical assistance, Monica Farrell and Daniele

Griffiths for proofreading the manuscript, and our colleagues

from the German Red Cross Blood Donor Service, especially

from the production unit, for support. This work was supported

by a research fund of the German Federal Ministry of Education

and Research (O1GN O531; K.B., H.L., and H.K.); ‘‘Osteo-

Cord’’ (LSHB-CT-2005-O18999), a project commissioned by

the European Community (K.B.); and Austrian Research Foun-

dation Grant N211-NAN (D.S.).

D

ISCLOSURE OF



P

OTENTIAL


C

ONFLICTS


OF

I

NTEREST



The authors indicate no potential conflicts of interest.

R

EFERENCES



1

Phinney DG, Prockop DJ. Concise review: mesenchymal stem/multi-

potent stromal cells: The state of transdifferentiation and modes of tis-

sue repair---current views. Stem Cells 2007;25:2896–2902.

2

Reinisch A, Bartmann C, Rohde E et al. Humanized system to propa-



gate cord blood-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for

clinical application. Regen Med 2007;2:371–382.

3

Schallmoser K, Bartmann C, Rohde E et al. Human platelet lysate can



replace fetal bovine serum for clinical-scale expansion of functional

mesenchymal stromal cells. Transfusion 2007;47:1436–1446.

4

Schallmoser K, Rohde E, Reinisch A et al. Rapid large-scale expan-



sion of functional mesenchymal stem cells from unmanipulated bone

marrow without animal serum. Tissue Eng Part C Methods 2008;14:

185–196.

5

Honn KV, Singley JA, Chavin W. Fetal bovine serum: A multivariate



standard. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1975;149:344–347.

6

Heiskanen A, Satomaa T, Tiitinen S et al. N-glycolylneuraminic acid



xenoantigen contamination of human embryonic and mesenchymal

stem cells is substantially reversible. Stem Cells 2007;25:197–202.

7

Sundin M, Ringden O, Sundberg B et al. No alloantibodies against



mesenchymal stromal cells, but presence of anti-fetal calf serum anti-

bodies, after transplantation in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell

recipients. Haematologica 2007;92:1208–1215.

2340


Human Alternatives to FBS for BM-MSC Expansion

8

Note for guidance on the use of bovine serum in the manufacture of

human medicinal products. EMEA CPMP/BWP/1793/02; 2003.

9

Note for the guidance on minimising risk of transmitting animal spon-



giform encephalopathy agents via human and veterinary medicinal

products EMEA/410/01 rev. 2; 2004.

10 Halme DG, Kessler DA. FDA regulation of stem-cell-based therapies.

N Engl J Med 2006;355:1730–1735.

11 Horwitz EM, Gordon PL, Koo WK et al. Isolated allogeneic bone

marrow-derived mesenchymal cells engraft and stimulate growth in

children with osteogenesis imperfecta: Implications for cell therapy of

bone. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2002;99:8932–8937.

12 Mannello F, Tonti GA. Concise review: No breakthroughs for human

mesenchymal and embryonic stem cell culture: conditioned medium,

feeder layer, or feeder-free; medium with fetal calf serum, human se-

rum, or enriched plasma; serum-free, serum replacement noncondi-

tioned medium, or ad hoc formula? All that glitters is not gold!Stem

Cells 2007;25:1603–1609.

13 Guideline on human cell-based medicinal products. EMEA/CHMP/

410869/2006; 2008.

14 Stute N, Holtz K, Bubenheim M et al. Autologous serum for isolation

and expansion of human mesenchymal stem cells for clinical use. Exp

Hematol 2004;32:1212–1225.

15 Lin HT, Tarng YW, Chen YC et al. Using human plasma supple-

mented medium to cultivate human bone marrow-derived mesenchy-

mal stem cell and evaluation of its multiple-lineage potential.

Transplant Proc 2005;37:4504–4505.

16 Phadnis SM, Joglekar MV, Venkateshan V et al. Human umbilical

cord blood serum promotes growth, proliferation, as well as differen-

tiation of human bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. In Vitro Cell

Dev Biol Anim 2006;42:283–286.

17 Doucet C, Ernou I, Zhang Y et al. Platelet lysates promote mesenchy-

mal stem cell expansion: A safety substitute for animal serum in cell-

based therapy applications. J Cell Physiol 2005;205:228–236.

18 Bernardo ME, Avanzini MA, Perotti C et al. Optimization of in vitro

expansion of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for cell-

therapy approaches: Further insights in the search for a fetal calf se-

rum substitute. J Cell Physiol 2007;211:121–130.

19 Capelli C, Domenghini M, Borleri G et al. Human platelet lysate

allows expansion and clinical grade production of mesenchymal stro-

mal cells from small samples of bone marrow aspirates or marrow fil-

ter washouts. Bone Marrow Transplant 2007;40:785–791.

20 Gregory CA, Reyes E, Whitney MJ et al. Enhanced engraftment of

mesenchymal stem cells in a cutaneous wound model by culture in

allogenic species-specific serum and administration in fibrin con-

structs. Stem Cells 2006;24:2232–2243.

21 Lange C, Cakiroglu F, Spiess AN et al. Accelerated and safe expansion of

human mesenchymal stromal cells in animal serum-free medium for trans-

plantation and regenerative medicine. J Cell Physiol 2007;213:18–26.

22 Davenport M, Verrier S, Droeser R et al. Platelet lysate as a serum sub-

stitute for 2D static and 3D perfusion culture of stromal vascular fraction

cells from human adipose tissue. Tissue Eng Part A 2009;15:869–875.

23 Mu¨ller I, Kordowich S, Holzwarth C et al. Animal serum-free culture

conditions for isolation and expansion of multipotent mesenchymal

stromal cells from human BM. Cytotherapy 2006;8:437–444.

24 Oreffo ROC, Virdi AS, Triffitt JT. Modulation of osteogenesis and

adipogenesis by human serum in human bone marrow cultures. Eur J

Cell Biol 1997;74:251–261.

25 Harrison P, Cramer EM. Platelet alpha-granules. Blood Rev 1993;7:

52–62.


26 Janetzko K, Kluter H, van Waeg G et al. Fully automated processing

of buffy-coat-derived pooled platelet concentrates. Transfusion 2004;

44:1052–1058.

27 Kocaoemer A, Kern S, Kluter H et al. Human AB serum and throm-

bin-activated platelet-rich plasma are suitable alternatives to fetal calf

serum for the expansion of mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tis-

sue. Stem Cells 2007;25:1270–1278.

28 Shahdadfar A, Fronsdal K, Haug T et al. In vitro expansion of human

mesenchymal stem cells: Choice of serum is a determinant of cell pro-

liferation, differentiation, gene expression, and transcriptome stability.

Stem Cells 2005;23:1357–1366.

29 Lannert H, Able T, Becker S et al. Optimizing BM harvesting from

normal adult donors. Bone Marrow Transplant 2008;42:443–447.

30 Kern S, Eichler H, Stoeve J et al. Comparative analysis of mesenchy-

mal stem cells from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, or adipose

tissue. Stem Cells 2006;24:1294–1301.

31 Bieback K, Kern S, Kluter H et al. Critical parameters for the isola-

tion of mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood. Stem Cells

2004;22:625–634.

32 Nguyen XD, Eichler H, Dugrillon A et al. Flow cytometric analysis of

T cell proliferation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction with dendritic

cells. J Immunol Methods 2003;275:57–68.

33 Bartmann C, Rohde E, Schallmoser K et al. Two steps to functional

mesenchymal stromal cells for clinical application. Transfusion 2007;

47:1426–1435.

34 Bieback K, Schallmoser K, Klu¨ter H, et al. Clinical protocols for the

isolation and expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells. Transfusion

Med Hemother. 2008;35:286–295.

35 Carrancio S, Lopez-Holgado N, Sanchez-Guijo FM et al. Optimization

of mesenchymal stem cell expansion procedures by cell separation

and culture conditions modification. Exp Hematol 2008;36:1014–1021.

36 Yamaguchi M, Hirayama F, Wakamoto S et al. Bone marrow stromal

cells prepared using AB serum and bFGF for hematopoietic stem cells

expansion. Transfusion 2002;42:921–927.

37 Dahl JA, Duggal S, Coulston N et al. Genetic and epigenetic instabil-

ity of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells expanded in auto-

logous serum or fetal bovine serum. Int J Dev Biol 2008;52:

1033–1042.

38 Trombi L, Pacini S, Montali M et al. Selective culture of mesodermal

progenitor cells (MPCs). Stem Cells Dev 2009 [Epub ahead of print].

39 Kobayashi T, Watanabe H, Yanagawa T et al. Motility and growth of

human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells during ex vivo expan-

sion in autologous serum. J Bone Joint Surg Br 2005;87:1426–1433.

40 Kuznetsov SA, Mankani MH, Robey PG. Effect of serum on human

bone marrow stromal cells: Ex vivo expansion and in vivo bone for-

mation. Transplantation 2000;70:1780–1787.

41 Coppinger JA, Cagney G, Toomey S et al. Characterization of the

proteins released from activated platelets leads to localization of novel

platelet proteins in human atherosclerotic lesions. Blood 2004;103:

2096–2104.

42 Italiano JE Jr, Richardson JL, Patel-Hett S et al. Angiogenesis is regu-

lated by a novel mechanism: Pro- and antiangiogenic proteins are

organized into separate platelet alpha granules and differentially

released. Blood 2008;111:1227–1233.

43 Levy O, Dvir T, Tsur-Gang O et al. Signal transducer and activator of

transcription 3-A key molecular switch for human mesenchymal stem

cell proliferation. Int J Biochem Cell Biol 2008;40:2606–2618.

44 Ng F, Boucher S, Koh S et al. PDGF, TGF-beta, and Fgf signaling is

important for differentiation and growth of mesenchymal stem cells

(MSCs): Transcriptional profiling can identify markers and signaling

pathways important in differentiation of MSCs into adipogenic, chon-

drogenic, and osteogenic lineages. Blood 2008;112:295–307.

45 Wynn TA. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis. J Pathol

2008;214:199–210.

46 Gronthos S, Simmons PJ, Graves SE et al. Integrin-mediated interac-

tions between human bone marrow stromal precursor cells and the

extracellular matrix. Bone 2001;28:174–181.

47 Thomas RJ, Hourd PC, Williams DJ. Application of process quality

engineering techniques to improve the understanding of the in vitro

processing of stem cells for therapeutic use. J Biotechnol 2008;136:

148–155.

48 Rubio D, Garcia-Castro J, Martin MC et al. Spontaneous human adult

stem cell transformation. Cancer Res 2005;65:3035–3039.

49 Zhang ZX, Guan LX, Zhang K et al. Cytogenetic analysis of human

bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells passaged in vitro. Cell

Biol Int 2007;31:645–648.

50 Meza-Zepeda LA, Noer A, Dahl JA et al. High-resolution analysis of

genetic stability of human adipose tissue stem cells cultured to senes-

cence. J Cell Mol Med 2008;12:553–563.

51 Poloni A, Maurizi G, Rosini V et al. Selection of CD271(

þ) cells and

human AB serum allows a large expansion of mesenchymal stromal

cells from human bone marrow. Cytotherapy 2009;11:153–162.

52 Quirici N, Soligo D, Bossolasco P et al. Isolation of bone marrow

mesenchymal stem cells by anti-nerve growth factor receptor antibod-

ies. Exp Hematol 2002;30:783–791.

53 Janetzko K, Cazenave JP, Kluter H et al. Therapeutic efficacy and

safety of photochemically treated apheresis platelets processed with an

optimized integrated set. Transfusion 2005;45:1443–1452.

54 von Bonin M, Stolzel F, Goedecke A et al. Treatment of refractory

acute GVHD with third-party MSC expanded in platelet lysate-con-

taining medium. Bone Marrow Transplant 2009;43:245–251.

See www.StemCells.com for supporting information available online.

Bieback, Hecker, Kocao¨mer et al.



2341

Kataloq: 2015
2015 -> Oitsning ma’nosi – Orttirilgan Immunitet Tanqisligi Sindromi. Bu dahshatli va bedavo kasallik hozirgi zamonning “vabosi” deb yuritiladi
2015 -> 4 İstehlakçıların davranışının modelləşdirilməsi Son istehlakçıların davranışının modelləşdirilməsi
2015 -> Klinik protokol Az ərbaycan Respublikas
2015 -> Üz–çənə cərrahiyyəsi Bölmə Gicgah-çənə oynağının xəstəlikləri və zədələnmələri 1 Çənə oynağının çıxığının əsas səbəbi nədir?
2015 -> Üz–çənə cərrahiyyəsi Bölmə Gicgah-çənə oynağının xəstəlikləri və zədələnmələri 1 Çənə oynağının çıxığının əsas səbəbi nədir?
2015 -> Stomatologiya 1 Sistem hipoplaziyası zamanı hansı dişlər zədələnir?
2015 -> Приложение №3 Информированное согласие пациента на пародонтологическое лечение
2015 -> Myuller h p parodontologiya pdf
2015 -> Buklet Azərbaycan Respublikası Prezidentinin 2011-ci il 7 iyul tarixli

Yüklə 0,77 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə