References: Jackson, N. O., and Pawar, S. (2013). A demographic Accounting Model for New Zealand. Nga Tangata Oho Mairangi: Regional Impacts of Demographic and Economic Change – 2013-2014. Mbie-funded project



Yüklə 100,63 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix14.04.2017
ölçüsü100,63 Kb.

References:  

Jackson, N. O., and Pawar, S. (2013). A Demographic Accounting Model for New Zealand. Nga Tangata Oho 



Mairangi: Regional Impacts of Demographic and Economic Change – 2013-2014. MBIE-funded project. , 

Hamilton, New Zealand: National Institute of Demographic and Economic Analysis, University of Waikato.

 

Age and Ethnic Structure 

 

Figure 7: Age Structure: Taranaki Region, European and Māori 2001 (unshaded bars) and 2013 (shaded bars)



 

Taranaki has New Zea-

land’s sixth-oldest Re-

gional population, but—

as elsewhere—the popu-

lation of European origin 

is relatively old, and the 

population of Māori 

origin, extremely young. 

Summary 

The population of the Taranaki Region has grown slowly 

over the past 27 years, from 107,499 in 1986 to 109,700 

in 2011 and 110,500 in 2013 (+2.8 per cent). The popu-

lation is projected to grow slowly over the next two dec-

ades with the Statistics New Zealand medium series pro-

jections  indicating  a  population  of  111,460  by  2031. 

However numbers could range as high as 125,500 (high 

series) or as low as 97,750 (low series). 

 

The major cause of the region’s growth is natural increase, 



with  net  migration  loss  occurring  across  most  of  the 

1990s  and  2000s,  but  decreasingly  so.  Increasingly, 

‘natural increase’ will be driven by growth at 65+ years, as 

the  baby  boomer  cohorts  move  into  these  age  groups  and 

numbers  rise  due  to  increasing  longevity.  Eventually  the 

same cohorts will drive the end of natural growth, as deaths 

will increase and will not be replaced by births. 

 

 



The  Taranaki  Region  experiences  an  on

 

 



going   problem  in  terms  of  net  migra-

 

 



tion loss at 15-19 and 20-24 years of age; 

 

 



however  that  loss  has  reduced  over  the 

 

 



past three Census periods.  

 

 



Net migration gains at younger and several older ages par-

tially offset that loss, but are not perfect substitutes because 

the sustained loss at young adult ages compounds over time 

to  reduce  the  primary  reproductive  age  group  (20-39 

years),  and  thus  the  number  of  children.  The  trends  have 

resulted in the Taranaki Region having the sixth-oldest pop-

ulation of New Zealand’s 16 regions, albeit the region is not 

ageing as fast as many.  

Mover and stayer data indicate that between 71 and 76 per 

cent  of  those  enumerated  as  living  in  the  Taranaki  Region 

on  Census  night  at  the  past  four  Censuses  had  been  living 

there 5 years previously. Auckland has increasingly provid-

ed the region’s largest gains  of internal migrants, followed 

by  Manawatu-Wanganui,  Waikato  and  Wellington.  The 

same  regions  feature  as  the  main  destinations  for  Tarana-

ki’s  leavers,  but  Manawatu-Wanganui  has  twice  beaten 

Auckland as the largest recipient. 

The Taranaki Region has a slightly greater proportion Ma ori 

than the national average, and a smaller proportion of those 

of  Pacific  Island,  Asian,  or    Middle  Eastern/Latin  Ameri-

can/African origin. The relative youth of the region’s Ma ori 

population  has  the  potential  to  bestow  an  economic  ad-

vantage as population ageing proceeds, as the older Europe-

an population disproportionately enters retirement, and the 

number of youthful labour force entrants declines. 

With 16.1 per cent aged 65+ years in 2013, the population of the Taranaki Region is New Zealand’s sixth-oldest (of 16 

regions; nationally 14.2 per cent is aged 65+ years). However age structures differ markedly by ethnic group. Figure 7 

compares the age structures of the Taranaki Region’s European and Ma ori populations*, which account for 76 and 15 per 

cent  of  the  total  (compared  with  65  and  13  per  cent  nationally—note  that  these  data  are  based  on  multiple  count 

ethnicity and thus sum to more than 100 per cent). In 2013 the median age for the region’s Ma ori population was 23.6 

years  (that  is,  one-half  of  the  Ma ori  population  was  aged  less  than  24  years),  compared  with  41.1  years  for  those  of 

European origin. The graphs also show how each population has aged structurally since 2001 (unshaded bars), due to 

the  demographic  changes  already  discussed.  The  Taranaki  Region  is  somewhat  less  multi-ethnic  than  is  the  case 

nationally, with just 1.4 per cent Pacific Island, 3.0 per cent Asian, 0.4 per cent Middle Eastern/Latin American/African, 

and 4.5 per cent ‘not identified’, compared with 6.3, 10.1, 1.0 and 4.9 per cent respectively at national level.

 

Notes: *Statistics New Zealand's Multiple Count method of enumeration means that people may be counted in more than one ethnic group 



Source: Statistics New Zealand, Area of Usual Residence (2001, 2006 and 2013) and Ethnic Group (Total Responses) by Age (Five Year Groups) and Sex For the census 

usually resident population count 

7.0


5.0

3.0


1.0

1.0


3.0

5.0


7.0

 0-4


 5-9

 10-14


 15-19

 20-24


 25-29

 30-34


 35-39

 40-44


 45-49

 50-54


 55-59

 60-64


 65-69

 70-74


 75-79

 80-84


85+

Percentage at each age group

Age

 G

ro

up

 (

ye

ar

s)

European

M

al

es

Fe

males

7.0


5.0

3.0


1.0

1.0


3.0

5.0


7.0

 0-4


 5-9

 10-14


 15-19

 20-24


 25-29

 30-34


 35-39

 40-44


 45-49

 50-54


 55-59

 60-64


 65-69

 70-74


 75-79

 80-84


85+

Percentage at each age group

Age

 G

ro

up

 (

ye

ar

s)

Mäori

M

al

es

Fe

males

Taranaki Region Population Size and Growth 

Inside this issue: 

Components of 

Change by 

Migration by Age 



Taranaki’s Movers 

and Stayers 

Population Ageing 



Age and Ethnic 

Structure 

Summary 




National Institute of 

Demographic and 

Economic Analysis 

(NIDEA) 

 

Faculty of Arts & Social 



Sciences, 

University of Waikato 

Private Bag 3105 

Hamilton 3240,  

New Zealand 

 

Phone:  



07 838 4040 

 

E-mail: 



nidea@waikato.ac.nz  

 

ISSN 2382-039X  



(Print) 

ISSN 2382-0403 

(Online) 

T A R A N A K I   R E G I O N   –   K E Y   D E M O G R A P H I C   T R E N D S  

2 0 1 3 - 2 0 6 3  

Natalie Jackson 

The  population  of  the  Taranaki  Region  has  grown  slowly  over  the  past  27  years,  from 

107,499  in  1986  to  109,700  in  2011  and  110,500  in  2013  (+2.8  per  cent),  albeit 

experiencing  a  period  of  decline  between  1996  and  2001  (Figure  1).  The  population  is 

projected to grow slowly over the next two decades with the Statistics New Zealand medium 

series  projections  (2006-base)  indicating  a  population  of  111,460  by  2031.  However 

numbers could range as high as 125,500 (high series) or as low as 97,750 (low series). 

 

The  major  component  of  the  Taranaki 



Region’s  population  growth  has  long  been 

natural 

increase 

(the 


difference 

between  births  and  deaths)  (Figure  2). 

Significant  net  migration  loss  occurred 

across  most  of  the  1990s  and  to  a  lesser 

extent  across  the  2000s,  with  that  loss  

completely  offsetting  natural  increase 

across  the  period  1996-2001  and 

explaining the overall decline. Although the 

region’s  natural  increase  experienced  a 

small  rise  over  the  mid–to  late-2000s  (as 

elsewhere 

in 


New 

Zealand), 

this 

component  of  growth  is  steadily  reducing 



as  the  population  ages  and  larger 

proportions  reach  the  age  at  which  they 

have completed childbearing.  

Components of Change 

NIDEA Demographic Snapshot No. 6  

Taranaki Region, June 2014

 

Figure 1:  Population of Taranaki Region 1986-2011 and projected to 2031 

Figure 2: Components of change:  Taranaki Region 

 

Source: Compiled from Statistics New Zealand, Infoshare

-2,000

-1,500


-1,000

-500


 -

 500


 1,000

 1,500


1992

1

9

9

2

-9

3

1

9

9

3

-9

4

1

9

9

4

-9

5

1

9

9

5

-9

6

1

9

9

6

-9

7

1

9

9

7

-9

8

1

9

9

8

-9

9

1

9

9

9

-2

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

-0

1

2

0

0

1

-0

2

2

0

0

2

-0

3

2

0

0

3

-0

4

2

0

0

4

-0

5

2

0

0

5

-0

6

2

0

0

6

-0

7

2

0

0

7

-0

8

2

0

0

8

-0

9

2

0

0

9

-1

0

2

0

1

0

-1

1

2

0

1

1

-1

2

2

0

1

2

-1

3

Taranaki REGION

N

u

m

ber

Natural Increase

Estimated Net Migration

Net Change

June Years

March Years

Source: Statistics New Zealand, Subnational Population Projections by Age and Sex, 2006(base)-2031 (October 2012 update)

107,499


109,700

125,500


111,460

97,750


0

20,000


40,000

60,000


80,000

100,000


120,000

140,000


1986

1991


1996

2001


2006

2011


2016

2021


2026

2031


Num

be

r



Observed (ERP)

High


Medium

Low


P a g e   2  

N I D E A   D e m o g r a p h i c   S n a p s h o t   N o .   6    

T a r a n a k i   R e g i o n ,   J u n e   2 0 1 4  

Components of Change by Component Flow 

Using New Zealand’s first ‘demographic accounting model’ 

(Jackson  &  Pawar  2013),  the  broad  components  of  the 

Taranaki Region’s population change can be broken down 

to give an approximation of their underlying flows. Figure 

3  shows  that  between  2008  and  2013,  the  Taranaki 

Region  grew  by  approximately  3,000  persons  (+2.8  per 

cent). Natural  increase  (births minus deaths) accounted 

for  3,177  persons,  slightly  reduced  by  an  estimated  net 

migration  loss  of  177  persons.  The  natural  increase 

component was in turn comprised of 7,835 births partially 

offset  by  4,658  deaths.  From  estimated  net  migration  (-

177) we then account for ‘known’ net migration (-1,029), 

comprised  of  net  internal  migration  (-237)  and  net 

international  permanent/long  term  (PLT)  migration  (-

792). 

This  leaves  an  unaccounted  for  component  of 



migration,  which  we  call  the  ‘residual’  component  (+852 

people  enumerated  as  having  moved  to  the  region 

between  2008  and  2013,  but  their  2008  origin  is 

unknown).  The  model  further  disaggregates  each  known 

net  migration  component  into  its  respective  inflows  and 

outflows  (8,517  internal  immigrants  and  8,754  internal 

emigrants; 6,067 PLT international immigrants and 6,859 

PLT  international  emigrants).  As  for  most  regions,  the 

overall picture is one of considerable ‘churn’, generated by 

large  numbers  of  leavers  and  arrivals  relative  to  the  net 

outcome. Data for the 1996-2001 and 2001-2006 periods 

are available on request from NIDEA.

 

Figure 3: Components Flows—Taranaki Region 2008-2013 

Migration by Age 

Figure 4: Net migration by age — Taranaki Region 1996-2001, 2001-2006 and 

2008-2013 

Start

107,500

     

110,500

   

End

7,835

+261.2%

4,658

-155.3% 

-7.9% 

-26.4% 

+8,517

+283.9%

-8,754

-291.8% 

+6,067

+202.2%

-6,859

-228.6% 

Source: Jackson & Pawar (2013)/Statistics New Zealand various sources 

NET CHANGE in Estimated Population

(ERP


2008

 - ERP


2013

)

+3,000



+2.8%

NATURAL INCREASE

(Births - Deaths)



+

ESTIMATED NET MIGRATION

+3,177

+105.9%

-177

-5.9% 

Births


Deaths

NET KNOWN MIGRATION

(Net Internal Migration + Net PLT Migration)



Residual Component of Migration

Estimated Net Migration - Net Known Migration)



-1,029

-34.3% 

+852

+28.4%

Internal In-migrants

Internal Out-migrants

PLT Arrivals 

PLT Departures

Net Internal Migration 

Net PLT Migration 

-237

-792

+

-



-

-

+



-

-

-



Between 2008 and 2013, the 

Taranaki Region grew by 3,000  

persons,  all of which was ac-

counted for by natural increase.  

Figure  4  shows  that  the  Taranaki  Region’s 

overall  net  migration  loss  between  2008  and 

2013 was largely accounted for by those at 15-

19    and  20-24  years  of  age;  however  loss  at 

these  ages  has  reduced  quite  systematically 

over  the  last  three  Census  periods.  Across  the 

2001-2006  and  2008-2013  periods,  small  net 

gains occurred at 0-9 years, and larger gains at 

25-39 years, indicating  the net arrival of young 

adults/parents  and  children  (note  that  these 

data  have  allowed  for  change  in  cohort  size). 

Between 2008 and 2013 there was also a small 

increase  in  net  migration  gain  at  60-89  years, 

indicating the increasing arrival of retirees. The 

underlying data show that most age groups saw 

both  internal  and  international  arrivals  and 

departures, with around half of the 2008-2013 

net  gain  at  30-34  and  60-69  years  being  of 

international migrants. 

 

Source: Jackson & Pawar (2013)/Statistics New Zealand various sources 

-3,000


-2,500

-2,000


-1,500

-1,000


-500

0

500



1,000

0

-4



 5

-9

1



0-

14

1



5-

19

2



0-

24

2



5-

29

3



0-

34

3



5-

39

4



0-

44

4



5-

49

5



0-

54

5



5-

59

6



0-

64

6



5-

69

7



0-

74

7



5-

79

8



0-

84

8



5-

89

9



0+

Nu

m



b

er

Age Group



1996-2001

2001-2006

2008-2013

P a g e   3  

T a r a n a k i   R e g i o n   –   k e y  

d e m o g r a p h i c   t r e n d s  

N I D E A   D e m o g r a p h i c   S n a p s h o t   N o .   6    

T a r a n a k i   R e g i o n ,   J u n e   2 0 1 4  

Data  from  the  2013  Census  indicate  that  71  per  cent  of 

those  enumerated  as  living  in  the  Taranaki  Region  on 

Census  night  2013  (March  5th)  had  been  living  there  in 

2008,  similar  to  the  proportion  at  the  2006  Census  but 

lower  than  in  1996  and  2001  (76  per  cent).  At  the  2013 

Census, those who had  not  been  born in 2008 accounted 

for the single largest component of  arrivals  (accounting 

for 7.2 per cent of the 2013 population), followed by those 

who  had  been  living  elsewhere  in  New  Zealand  but  not 

further  defined  (5.0  per  cent).  The  next  largest 

contingents  were  those  who  had  been  overseas  in  2008 

and  those  who  did  not  state  where  they  had  been  living 

(4.6  per  cent  each).  Internally,  the  next  largest 

contributions came from Auckland, Manawatu-Wanganui, 

the Waikato and Wellington.  

Leavers:  The data for those who had been living in the 

Taranaki Region in 2008 but were living elsewhere at the 

2013 Census show marked similarity to the main regions 

of origin, the single-largest  proportions  of leavers having 

gone  to  Auckland,  Wellington,  Manawatu-Wanganui, 

followed by Waikato.  

Perhaps the most interesting observation from these data 

is that the patterns have been remarkably consistent over 

the past four Censuses, the regions of origin and 

destination of Taranaki’s internal migrants remaining 

almost identical over time, although in both 1996 and 

2006 Manawatu-Wanganui out-performed Auckland as 

the main region of destination.

 

 



Population Ageing 

Figure 5: Taranki’s Movers and Stayers  2008-2013

 

As  elsewhere,  declining  birth  rates,  increasing  longevity,  and—in  Taranaki’s  case—net  migration  loss  at  15-24 

years,  are  causing  the  population  to  age  structurally.  Currently,  the  Taranaki  Region  has  the  sixth  oldest  age 

structure of New Zealand’s  16 regions,  but  it is not ageing as fast as some; in 2006 it had the second  oldest  age 

structure.  The  New  Plymouth  and  Stratford  Districts  are  slightly  older  (17  per  cent  aged  65+  years),  and  South 

Taranaki  slightly  younger  (15.3  per  cent  aged  65+  years).  At  regional  level,  all  age  groups  below  65  years  are 

projected to decline in size across the period 2011-2031, and those at 65+ years to increase (Figure 6). By 2031, 

26.2 per cent of the population of the Taranaki Region is projected to be aged 65+ years, up from 16.1 per cent in 

2011. The Taranaki Region and Stratford District can expect to have more elderly than children by 2021, around 

five years earlier than for total New Zealand, while this will occur for New Plymouth a little earlier, around 2016, 

and not until 2026 for South Taranaki. 

Figure 6:  Projected change (numbers) 2011-2031 by  broad age group 

Taranaki’s Movers and Stayers 

The past four censuses in-

dicate that between 71 and 

76 per cent of people enu-

merated as living in the 

Taranaki Region at each 

Census had been living in 

the Region five years previ-

ously . 

ource: Jackson, 



Source: Statistics New Zealand, Subnational Population Projections by Age and Sex, 2006(base)-2031 (October 2012 update)

-40.0


-20.0

0.0


20.0

40.0


60.0

80.0


100.0

120.0


Taranaki Region

New Zealand

Per

cen

ta

ge 

Ch

an

ge, 

201



-2031

0-14 years

15-24 years

25-39 years

40-54 years

55-64 years

65-74 years

75-84 years



85+ years


Yüklə 100,63 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə