Regeneration mechanisms in Swamp Paperbark (Melaleuca ericifolia Sm.) and their implications for wetland rehabilitation


part of the overall project into the management of Dowd Morass



Yüklə 5,47 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/13
tarix30.08.2017
ölçüsü5,47 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13
part of the overall project into the management of Dowd Morass.  
 
The geographical coordinates of the ground control points were determined in the field 
using a Garmin GPS instrument (72 version 2.03 hand-held unit, Garmin, Olathe, USA). 
At least five GCPs were identified on each photograph from the 2003 series. The rectified 
images were resampled using a nearest-neighbour algorithm and projected in the 
Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) co-ordinate system. Images were saved in digital 
Bitmap (BMP) file format and then inserted into an AutoCAD R2002 drawing file (.dwg 
format) (Autodesk Pty Ltd.). An area of approximately 10.5 ha on the aerial photograph 
was randomly selected and geo-referenced, using three fixed points on-the-ground. 
Individual genets of M. ericifolia were measured in the field in February 2004 to obtain 

 
61
scale. Using these known dimensions the scale of the base photo was adjusted to match 
on-ground measurements and set to 1:100.  
 
Individual genets were identified and traced using the AutoCAD command polyline in 
each bitmap image and an individual number was assigned to each genet. The polyline 
command is a connected sequence of line segments that creates a single object. Drawing 
a polyline creates an enclosed boundary around an object, assigning the object a physical 
size. The AutoCAD command 
getarea was used to calculate the area enclosed within the 
boundary of each plant patch. The getarea  command generates an area result in square 
metres, to one decimal place. The area data obtained from each calculation was then 
tabulated alongside each plant patch. This process was repeated for each plant patch 
identified on the aerial photograph series.  
 
 
Determination of growth rates and longevity based on aerial photography interpretation 
 
A series of aerial photographs of Dowd Morass taken in 1957, 1964, 1973, 1978, 1982 
and 1991, at a scale of 1:6,000 to 1:20,000 (Table 3.1) was obtained from the Land 
Information Centre, Laverton, Victoria and Parks Victoria, Government of Victoria. 
These photos were scanned and rectified using the same procedure listed above.  
 
 
 
 

 
62
Table 3.1 Source and characteristics of aerial photographs used in this study. VLIC is the 
Victorian Land Information Centre (Laverton, Victoria) and PV is Parks Victoria.  
Date Source 
Series 
Approximate 
scale 
Emulsion 
 
May 1964 
 
VLIC 
 
Lake Wellington Project 
 
1:16,000 
 
Black and White 
April 1973 
VLIC 
Dutson 
1:8,000 
Black and White 
Feb 1982 
VLIC 
Sale M/S 8321 
1:42,500 
Black and White 
Nov 1991 
VLIC 
Sale M/S 8321 
1:25,000 
Colour 
Aug 2003 
PV 
GL Ramsar Wetlands 
1:6,000 
Colour 
 
 
An area containing all genetically tested patches was selected from the 2003 image and 
from each historical aerial photograph. These images were cropped and the image size 
adjusted so that all images were the same size (389 x 328 pixels). Plant specimens with 
known dimensions (obtained at the site in February 2004) were used as a point of 
reference to obtain scale. Using these known dimensions the scale of the base photo 
(2003) was adjusted to match on-ground measurements and the scale was set to 1:100. 
Each subsequent bitmap image was adjusted by applying the same scale ratio.  
 
Plant patches identified as individual genets using the molecular method and eight 
additional patches with similar configurations were identified on each bitmap image and 
traced using the AutoCAD command polyline. An individual number was assigned to 
each selected genet. The area data obtained from each calculation was then tabulated 
alongside each plant patch. This process was repeated for each plant patch identified on 
the aerial photograph series. Age of genets was determined by backward tracing of the 
expansion of the identified patches from the most recent aerial photograph to the oldest 

 
63
until individual patches were no longer able to be located or identified. The smallest size 
of genet able to be reliably identified was just less than 50 m
2
. Genets were selected from 
an area of Dowd Morass that has been subjected to the least amount of human 
interference, particularly to water regime. It was deemed that these genets would 
represent the underlying growth rates of the species better than those subject to artificially 
raised or lowered water levels. Additional considerations in the selection of genets were 
the clarity of photographs and the ability to clearly identify individuals over the time 
period of the study.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
64
3.3 Results 
 
3.3.1 Vegetative reproduction 
 
Physical examination of the exposed roots systems of mature plants revealed extensive 
connective networks of roots between both mature ramets and mature and immature 
ramets (Figure 3.1). While it was impossible to trace all the connections within individual 
patches it was possible to trace connections between individual ramets. Most of the root 
systems observed were very shallow, generally 20-30cm deep with the majority of larger 
roots within 5-10cm of the soil surface (Figure 3.4). Young, actively-growing ramets 
arose directly off larger (> 1 cm diameter) roots. Exposure and tracing of the root system 
of young growths on the edges of patches confirmed their connection to larger previously 
established ramets (Figure 3.1).  
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
65
 
Figure 3.4 Exposed edge of a patch of M. ericifolia showing the depth of the extensive 
network of roots, Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1 m 

 
66
3.3.2 ISSR analysis 
 
 
The use of ISSR confirmed visual and physical assessments of clonality (section 3.3.1), 
with individual genets being easily determined both on-the-ground and from aerial 
photographs. Sampling of the two large patches (60 m x 120 m and 55 m x 60 m) 
indicated that, as predicted, they were derived from three and two genets, respectively 
(Figure 3.5, 3.6). Unique multilocus phenotypes within both patches exhibited distinct 
and exclusive clustering with no indication of intermingling. Two samples within genet 
two (ladder 9 and 11) failed to amplify clearly in either run, giving misleading results 
(Figure 3.6). This was attributed to the sample being composed of slightly older material 
than the other samples or a processing error.  
 
Sampling of the five individual ring-shaped patches strongly suggests derivation from 
individual genets. Two of the individual patches (genet 6 and 10) had one anomalous 
sample occurring within the regenerating centre where the original ramets had died.  
There was little dissimilarity (one allele difference) between the phenotype of these two 
anomalous sample and the phenotype of the surrounding plant (primer 814) and it was 
not possible to determine if this was a somatic mutation, a distinct genet, contamination 
or improper amplification during processing of the sampled material (Figure 3.6). The 
same results were obtained after running the samples twice. Whatever the explanation, 
there would appear to be a genuine difference between these two anomalous samples and 
the surrounding samples.  
 

 
67
The probabilities of getting the same sequences occurring more than once was 
exceedingly low for all phenotypes identified in this study with the exception of 
phenotypes 6 and 10 (Table 3.2).  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 3.5 Two large patches of M. ericifolia showing the individual genets (1-5) 
determined by ISSR.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
50 m

2
3

5

 
68
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 3.6 ISSR DNA profiles for all samples using primer 814. Groups appearing 
between “ladder” bands represent individual genets.  * = Samples that contain anomalous 
bands.  
*
*

 
69
 
Table 3.2 Probability of observed phenotypes occurring (Pgen) based on allele 
frequencies in the whole data set and the probability, given that they have been observed, 
of obtaining the observed number of samples with indistinguishable phenotypes from 
sexual reproduction. 
Phenotype n 
Pgen  P=(Pgen)
(n-1)
 
1 6 
4.62E-15 
2.12E-72 
2 7 
3.96E-13 
3.84E-75 
2A 2 2.29E-14 
2.29E-14 
3 6 
1.81E-13 
1.95E-64 
4 6 
1.12E-17 
1.73E-85 
5 9 
3.72E-13 
3.70E-100 
6 6 
8.79E-13 
5.24E-61 
6A 1 5.24E-61  1 
7 7 
1.20E-15 
3.00E-90 
8 7 
2.22E-15 
1.19E-88 
9 7 
7.25E-13 
1.45E-73 
10 6 3.87E-13 
8.63E-63 
10A 1 4.92E-14 

 
 
Under both sampling regimes (patches and ring-shaped patches) the genets covered large 
areas (1-3,275 m
2
; 2-1,645 m
2
; 3-2,535 m
2
; 4-1,320 m
2
; 5-1,922 m
2
; see also Table 3.3) in 
2003 and were composed of hundreds of individual ramets. Several genets growing in 
close proximity to each other exhibited apparently competitive relationships, with the 
more rapidly expanding genet crowding adjacent genets, and the apparently less 
competitive genets growing laterally away from the competitive front. Phenotypic 
variations could be observed on the ground that corresponded to genotypic variation 
confirmed by genetic testing allowing visual identification of individual genets (Figure 
3.7) 
 

 
70
 
Figure 3.7 Visual differentiation of phenotypes – phenotype 4 (left) with small bright 
green leaves and upright, white stems. phenotype 5 (right) with olive green leaves and 
spreading, grey stems. Lack of intermingling of genets is visible in centre of photo. 
Phenotype 4 and 5 correspond to genets 4 and 5 in Figure 4.5.   
 
3.3.3 Growth rates and longevity, determined from aerial photographs 
 
The use of historical aerial photographs allowed for the determination of growth rates of 
individual genets of M. ericifolia over a period of 46 years (Figure 3.8). There was a clear 
colour/greyscale difference between M. ericifolia and Phragmites australis on the 
images.  The distinctive round shape of the M. ericifolia genets assisted greatly in 
isolating individual genets.  

 
71
 
Mean expansion rates of individual genets of 
M. ericifolia over the 46-year study period 
varied widely, ranging from just over 3.5 m
2
 to nearly 9 m
2
 per year (Table 3.3). On 
average this represented an expansion rate of just over 5.4 m
2
 per year and just less than 
0.5 m of lateral extension annually. Expansion rate, however, was not, evenly distributed 
over the 46-year sample period (Figure 3.9, 3.10). After an initial rapid establishment 
phase between 1957 and 1964, growth slowed in the following period, 1964 – 1973. 
Between 1973 and 1991 expansion continued at an exponential rate, after which there 
was a considerable slowing of lateral spread (Figure 3.10).   
 
Table 3.3 Size of 18 individual genets of M. ericifolia at the end of each sample period at 
Dowd Morass over 46 years (1957-2003). Measurements are in m
2

 
Genet 
1957 
1964 
1973 
1978 
1982 
1991 
2003 

NA 
53 
63 
108 
407 
732 
2240 

NA 
102 
193 
297 
536 
1419 
1614 

NA 
261 
359 
455 
741 
1526 
1817 

NA 
153 
240 
350 
606 
1373 
1922 

NA 
100 
260 
417 
652 
1206 
1320 

NA 
64 
128 
211 
255 
953 
1490 

NA 
234 
391 
610 
829 
1952 
2549 

NA 
266 
388 
504 
954 
1961 
3274 

NA 
137 
329 
530 
823 
1608 
1645 
10 
NA 
291 
460 
754 
854 
2145 
2535 
11 
NA 
45 
423 
622 
885 
1086 
1632 
12 
NA 
109 
204 
340 
518 
932 
1528 
13 
NA 
125 
281 
436 
580 
1265 
1934 
14 
NA 
51 
58 
116 
438 
786 
1407 
15 
NA 
191 
235 
359 
641 
821 
1174 
16 
NA 
262 
378 
54 
822 
2207 
2219 
17 
NA 
82 
231 
377 
575 
797 
1837 
18 
NA 
74 
134 
401 
803 
2018 
2131 
 

 
72
 
Figure 3.8 Historical aerial photographs of a section of Down Morass, from which 
growth rates and longevity of genets of M. ericifolia were derived. Pale sections (CR) of 
photos represent Phragmites  australis (Common Reed); dark patches (SP) represent M. 
ericifolia (Swamp Paperbark).  
SP 
CR 

 
73
The aerial photographs indicated that individual genets of M. ericifolia reached large 
sizes after 46 years, ranging from 1,174 to 3,274 m
2
. While there was no direct evidence 
of longevity of individual genets of M. ericifolia, evidence of a marked slowing of 
expansion rate and the development of ring-shaped genets (where the centres had died 
out) suggest that individual ramets may senesce after approximately 40 years. Large 
genets, up to 40-60 m across, identified on the photographs from 1957, were still 
observed in the aerial photographs when compared to 2003. These individuals, based on 
expansion rates identified in this study, would range in age between 80 and 100 years old. 
The ongoing replacement of older ramets with daughter ramets within the genet makes 
aging of these older individuals problematic. Ages considerably older than 100 years may 
be obtained but remain undetected if lateral expansion is not possible and only internal 
replacement of ramets takes place.  
 
 
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Plant number
Mean expansion rate (m

per year)
 
Figure 3.9 Mean expansion of individual M. ericifolia genets over 46 years (1957-2003) 
at Dowd Morass, Sale Victoria.  

 
74
 
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
1964
1973
1978
1982
1991
2003
Year at end of measurement period 
Mean expansion rate (m
2
) per 
period
 
Figure 3.10 Mean expansion of all genets of M. ericifolia during various periods over 46 
years (1957-2003) at Dowd Morass, Sale, Victoria. (n = 18, error bars represent standard 
deviation) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1964
1978
1991

 
75
3.4 Discussion 
 
 
3.4.1 Genet size and growth type 
 
ISSR proved useful in determining individual genets in M. ericifolia, with Primer 814 
differentiating each putative genet. Other primers could not be used to differentiate 
genets. The DNA-based markers (ISSRs) used in this study identified clear clustering of 
distinct multilocus phenotypes, indicating that M. ericifolia exhibits the characteristics 
typical of the ‘phalanx’ mode of clonal growth (Lovett Doust 1981), and most notably a 
dense advancing front of closely spaced ramets. Similar results have been reported for the 
strongly clonal Eucalyptus argutifolia (Myrtaceae) in Western Australia (Kennington and 
James 1997) and in a range of other clonal Eucalyptus species throughout Australia 
(Lacey 1983; Tyson et al. 1998; Smith et al. 2003) and Melaleuca and Populus species 
overseas (Kempermen and Barnes 1976; Miwa et al. 2001). The EucalyptusMelaleuca 
and the Populus species listed above all exhibited the phalanx mode of growth. These 
results confirm anecdotal evidence that large dome-shaped patches of Melaleuca 
ericifolia are composed of one genet and that adjoining genets exhibit no intermingling 
even though they may grow in close proximity and form larger patches. 
 
Genet sizes measured in this study, 1,320 to 3,275 m
2
, were markedly larger than 
reported for other phalanx clonal species of Australian Myrtaceae, eg.  Eucalyptus 
argutifolia (529 m
2
) (Kennington
 
and James 1997) and 
Eamygdalina X risdonii (19 m
2

(Tyson et al. 1998). Genets of Melaleuca cajuputi in Thailand obtained large sizes (530 
m
2
) (Miwa 
et al. 2001), but were still less than half the size of the smallest M. ericifolia 
genets at Dowd Morass. Although large, genets of M. ericifolia are relatively small 

 
76
compared with some other notable clonal species, such as Lomatia tasmanica (1.2 km 
wide (Lynch et al. 1998)), Pteridium aquilinum (1.2 km wide (Parks and Werth 1993), 
Zostera marina (6,400 m
2
 (Reusch 
et al. 1999) and Populus tremuloides (43.3 ha 
(Kemperman and Barnes 1976).   
 
Species demonstrating either the phalanx or guerrilla mode of clonal growth may retain 
connections between the ramets. This characteristic was exhibited in M. ericifolia (Figure 
3.1). These physical attachments allow all the ramets within a genet to function as one, 
facilitating resource sharing, particularly nutrients, oxygen and water between individual 
and potentially widely separated ramets (Marshall 1990). The physical attachments 
between stems may be of particular importance in M. ericifolia, which grows in an 
environment with highly variable water regimes and salinities. The ecological 
implications for individual genets composed of large numbers of ramets with semi-
permanent to permanent connections are many-fold, most notably in relation to rapid site 
capture and efficient nutrient foraging and utilization.  
 
Organisation of physiologically integrated ramets in the phalanx growth form has 
particular advantages in environments that are temporally heterogeneous (Eriksson and 
Jerling 1990). Integrated ramets allow plants such as M. ericifolia, once established from 
seed, to colonize sites that would be unavailable if seedling recruitment alone were the 
only method of colonization (Alpert 1995) with older ramets subsidising daughter ramets. 
Should connected ramets occupy large areas over a gradient, the entire genet would not 
be permanently affected should part of the plant be inundated, desiccated or subject to 
unfavourable salinity levels, a common feature of the areas occupied by M. ericifolia
Additionally, extensive clonality may allow plants to expand into areas normally too dry 
or too wet to support mature M. ericifolia, with the dry area ramets being subsidised by 

 
77
those in moister habitats and vice versa, increasing the ecological amplitude of the 
species. Ramets of Fragaria chiloensis growing in well lit, dry, and nutrient poor habitats 
are known to share resources with connected ramets in shaded, well-watered, nutrient 
rich habitats to the benefit of both (Alpert and Mooney 1986). Extensive carbohydrate 
reserves in the underground storage organs also allow rapid regeneration after 
perturbations such as fire and flood (James 1984).  
 
The confirmation, through the use of molecular analysis, that large dome-shaped patches 
of  M. ericifolia are predominantly if not exclusively one genet significantly alters how 
conservation of this species needs to be approached in future. The lack of integration of 
adjacent genets and the large number of closely-spaced ramets supports anecdotal 
evidence that M. ericifolia possesses the phalanx manner of clonal growth. The rapid 
expansion rate and large size obtained by individual genets in a relatively short period of 
time implies that few genets are able occupy a given space at any given time. These 
factors combined alter perceptions of the true diversity of what would have previously 
been considered populations.  This study clearly elucidates that there are in fact only 
about 7 plants per hectare in a naturally occurring population, not hundreds or even 
thousands as previously thought.   
 

Yüklə 5,47 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə