Regional anaesthesia



Yüklə 85,58 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix13.03.2017
ölçüsü85,58 Kb.
#11232

REGIONAL ANAESTHESIA

Detection and management of epidural haematomas related to

anaesthesia in the UK: a national survey of current practice

J. Meikle



1

, S. Bird

1

, J. J. Nightingale



2

* and N. White

3

1

Department of Anaesthesia, Basingstoke and North Hampshire Foundation Trust, Aldermaston Road,



Basingstoke RG24 9NA, UK.

2

Department of Anaesthesia, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Cosham, Portsmouth



PO6 3LY, UK.

3

Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Bournemouth Hospital, Castle Lane East, Bournemouth



BH7 7DW, UK

*Corresponding author. E-mail: jeremy.nightingale@porthosp.nhs.uk

Background. Epidural haematoma is a rare, but potentially disastrous complication of epidural

analgesia. Favourable neurological outcome depends upon early recognition and surgical

decompression; therefore, the management of epidural analgesia should include a systematic

approach to recognition of the signs of epidural haematoma.

Methods. We conducted a national postal survey of the policies and protocols used by acute

pain services for investigating clinical signs suggestive of epidural haematoma, and the availability of

urgent MRI scans. This was a repeat of a survey that was carried out in 2001, but not published.

Results. The response rate was 84%. Of the acute pain services that responded, 99% have a

written protocol for running epidural infusions, 91% include regular assessment of sensory and

motor function, and 55% have a written protocol for the investigation of abnormal motor block.

On-site 24 h access to MRI scanning facilities was available to 57%, 33% have arrangements with

another hospital, and 10% do not have 24 h access to MRI. Thirty per cent of respondents knew

of an epidural haematoma related to epidural analgesia in their hospital, one-third of which were

not diagnosed and treated within 24 h.

Conclusions. Improvements in monitoring have occurred over the last 5 yr, but observations of

neurological function are not routine in all units, and are not continued after removal of the epi-

dural catheter in the majority. The authors suggest that acute pain services should be responsible

for protocols for the investigation and treatment of epidural haematomas.

Br J Anaesth 2008; 101: 400–4

Keywords: anaesthetic techniques, epidural; analgesia, postoperative; analgesic techniques,

epidural; complications, haematoma; complications, neurological

Accepted for publication: May 4, 2008

Epidural infusions are used routinely for analgesia after

operation and during labour. The recently published

national census of central neuraxial block in the UK, which

reported the snapshot phase of the Third National Audit

Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists,

1

found that a



total of 3839 epidurals, excluding caudals, and 657 com-

bined spinal and epidurals were performed for postopera-

tive analgesia in adults and children over a 2 week period.

Applying the multiplier of 25 used by the census, the

authors suggest that approximately 112 400 epidurals may

be performed annually for postoperative analgesia in the

UK. The survey does not distinguish between epidural

catheter insertion and ‘single-shot’ epidurals, so the rate of

catheter insertion may be lower, but it is reasonable to

assume that the majority of these procedures involve inser-

tion of an epidural catheter. This correlates with our esti-

mate obtained by extrapolating from our acute pain service

audit data. Approximately 900 epidural catheters are sited

annually for postoperative analgesia in Portsmouth, which

serves a population of approximately 580 000—roughly

1% of the national population, so assuming other insti-

tutions have a similar epidural rate to our own, the number

This article is accompanied by Editorial I.



# The Board of Management and Trustees of the British Journal of Anaesthesia 2008. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org

British Journal of Anaesthesia 101 (3): 400–4 (2008)

doi:10.1093/bja/aen170

Advance Access publication June 13, 2008



of epidural catheters sited annually for postoperative

analgesia in the UK would be of the order of 90 000.

The quoted incidence of epidural haematomas is around

1:190 000,

2

but this is likely to be an underestimate as it



is based on cases reported in the literature. This would

suggest a likely incidence of one epidural haematoma

every 2 yr related to epidurals used for postoperative

analgesia in the UK. Although rare, the consequences of

an epidural haematoma can be devastating, especially if

not detected and treated rapidly.

Seven years ago, an epidural haematoma occurred in our

hospital. Both detection and treatment were delayed. In

response to this, we revised the protocol for investigation

of abnormal motor block and, as MRI was not routinely

available outside normal working hours in our hospital,

made arrangements with the regional neurosurgery unit for

MRI to be performed when indicated by our acute pain

service protocol. We subsequently undertook, but did not

publish, a national postal survey to assess how and where

patients with epidural infusions were monitored in other

hospitals, and what arrangements were in place for the

investigation and management of epidural haematomas.

The results of this survey showed that regular checks of

sensory and motor function did not occur in all hospitals

and that fewer than one-third of acute pain services contin-

ued checks after the epidural had been removed. Only

43% had access to MRI scanning in their hospital. Many

of those without direct MRI access used MRI scanners in

non-neurosurgical units, increasing treatment delay if the

results were positive. Thus, 6 yr later, we have repeated

the survey to elicit current practice and to determine

whether practice in this area had changed.

Methods

We obtained a list of all anaesthetic departments in the



UK from the Royal College of Anaesthetists and obtaining

the addresses of the 301 departments registered as having

College Tutors. We sent a numbered questionnaire

(Appendix 1) to each of these departments, addressed to a

member of the acute pain service. A covering letter

explained that data collected would be made anonymous

and be non-attributable. After 12 weeks, we re-sent the

questionnaire to non-responders. The results were collated

and compared with those from 2001.

Results


Three hundred and one questionnaires were sent out, and

254 replies were returned—a response rate of 84%. Ten hos-

pitals which had no acute pain team returned uncompleted

questionnaires. All but two hospitals ran postoperative

epidurals. Thus, completed replies were received from 242

hospitals where postoperative epidural infusions were in use,

and this figure is used as the denominator for calculating

percentages, which are rounded to the nearest integer.

Epidural infusions are managed on normal wards in 222

units (92%), and the remaining 20 units (8%) run them

only on a high dependency facility. These results show a

change in practice from 2001 when only 80% of units

managed epidurals on surgical wards. Written protocols for

running postoperative epidural infusions were in place in

239 units (99%), compared with 95% in 2001 (Table 1).

Epidural observations

Two hundred and twenty units (91%) make regular assess-

ment of sensory level and motor function (84% in 2001),

with the remaining 20 not making assessments (Table 1).

In 189 units (78%), these observations are made at least 4

hourly (six respondents did not answer this question). One

hundred and seven units (44%) continue to monitor

sensory and motor function after epidural catheters are

removed (29% in 2001), and 30 units (12%) monitor for

more than 12 h after removal.

In 2001, only 31 units (13%) had a written protocol for

the investigation of a suspected epidural haematoma. In

2007, we asked more specifically about the existence of a

protocol for the investigation of abnormal motor block,

and 129 (53%) confirmed such a protocol was in place.

When an epidural haematoma is suspected, a consultant

anaesthetist is solely (49%) or jointly (34%) responsible

for instigating investigation in 202 units, leaving 40 units

(17%) in which responsibility is not taken by a consultant

anaesthetist.

Access to MRI scans

Six years ago, 43% of units had 24 h access to an MRI

scanner, compared with 136 (57%) now, but 100 do not,

and six did not answer this question (Table 2). Of the 100

units which do not have in-house access to a scanner, 81

have access to an MRI in another hospital and 19 do not

have 24 h access. One hundred and twenty-six units (52%)

have a specific agreement with their radiologists to allow

24 h access to MRI scanning for suspected haematomas

Table 1

Acute pain service protocols



2001

2007


Yes

No

Yes



No

Do you have a written

protocol for running

postoperative epidural

infusions?

236


12

239


3

Does this include regular

assessment of sensory level

and motor function?

197

39

222



20

Are observations made at

least 4 hourly?

177


20

189


27

Do observations continue

after the epidural is

removed?


73

124


107

115


Do they continue for more

than 12 h?

16

57

30



77

Detection and management of epidural haematomas related to anaesthesia

401


and 116 either do not (75) or did not answer. Forty-seven

units (19%) have agreed an investigation and treatment

protocol with their local neurosurgical or spinal unit, 187

(77%) do not, and 11 did not answer this question.

Epidural haematomas

Seventy-two (30%) of the respondents were aware of an

epidural haematoma that had occurred in their hospital at

some time. The figure 6 yr previously was 32 (13%). This

suggests that our estimate of one epidural haematoma per

2 yr occurring in the UK may indeed be an underestimate.

In 48 of 72 cases of epidural haematoma, the diagnosis,

investigation, and treatment were achieved in 24 h, but in

24 cases (33%), this was not achieved. Reasons for delay

reported in the current survey were: delay in picking up

the clinical signs (20 cases), lack of MRI availability (two

cases), and delays in transfer to other units (two cases). In

comparison, in 2001, 10 out of 32 cases (31%) were not

managed within 24 h.

Discussion

Epidural haematomas after the use of epidural analgesia are

mercifully rare. However, in our study, 72 respondents were

aware of an epidural haematoma having occurred in their

unit, an increase of 40 over the last 6 yr. The forthcoming

publication of the second stage of the Royal College of

Anaesthetists Third National Audit project may provide more

information about the incidence of epidural haematomas.

Classically, epidural haematomas cause radicular pain,

motor impairment, sensory loss, and urinary retention.

Patients with epidural infusions are usually catheterized

and have some sensory deficit, so these clinical signs may

not be helpful in detecting problems. When related to

epidural anaesthesia, not all haematomas are painful. In a

review of 61 epidural haematomas related to central neur-

axial block, pain was the presenting complaint in only

38% of cases.

3

The most reliable sign of a developing hae-



matoma in a patient with an epidural infusion is the devel-

opment of motor block, and this should therefore be

checked for regularly. The literature also suggests that

motor block is the most sensitive prognostic indicator. The

Frankel scale for assessing spinal injury and its subsequent

modification by the American Spinal Injury Association

uses motor function as the principle variable assessed

(Appendix 2). This is the scoring system used in the two

largest studies relating outcome from epidural haematomas

to the severity of neurological deficit.

4 5

Our survey



revealed that there are still some units where regular

checks of motor and sensory block are not made, although

this has improved a little compared with 6 yr ago. The

authors agree with Christie and McCabe

6

that it is vital



that motor function be assessed regularly in all patients

with epidural analgesia.

Epidural haematoma related to an epidural catheter may

occur


at

any


time

after


insertion,

including

after

removal.


7 – 10

A review


3

reported that 50% of haematomas

relating to epidural catheters occurred after their removal.

There have been several case reports of haematomas

occurring more than 12 h after catheter removal.

9 10


It is

of concern that only 44% of units continue epidural block

assessments after removal of the catheter, and only 12%

of units continue these assessments for more than 12

h. The authors believe that observations should be contin-

ued for 24 h after removal of the catheter.

The definitive treatment of an epidural haematoma is sur-

gical decompression by laminectomy. The factors that deter-

mine outcome are the severity of the neurological deficit at

presentation and the time from presentation to surgery.

4 5

If

surgery is carried out within 12 h of the onset of symptoms,



recovery rates are better than 60%, but if surgery takes place

more than 24 h after the presentation of symptoms, recovery

rates drop to about 10%.

5

This demonstrates the importance



of regular assessment of patients’ motor function both

while the catheter is in place and after it is removed. We feel

that the referral path for patients with signs suggestive of

epidural haematoma, particularly motor block, should be

clearly delineated, preferably involving a consultant anaes-

thetist, in order to avoid delays in the instigation of appro-

priate investigations and treatment.

The investigation of choice for a suspected epidural

haematoma is an MRI scan.

11

Our study showed that 56%



of units had 24 h access to an MRI in their hospital, an

increase of 25% over 6 yr. Twenty-four units did not have

any access to MRI scanning. Most of the units without

MRI scanners have access to a scanner in another hospital.

However, if this is not the hospital that can offer decom-

pression, then a positive result will need a second transfer

to a neurosurgical or spinal unit. As time between diagno-

sis and treatment is critical, introducing another transfer

Table 2

Facilities for investigating and treating haematoma



2001

2007


Yes

No

Yes



No

Do you have access to

emergency MRI scanning

24 h a day in your

hospital?

107


141

136


100

If not do you have 24 h

access in another hospital?

108


33

81

19



Is this in a spinal or

neurosurgery unit?

73

35

67



14

Do you have an agreement

with your radiologists to

provide urgent MRI scans

for suspected epidural

haematomas 24 h a day?

88

160


126

75

Do you have an



investigation and treatment

protocol agreed with your

local spinal or

neurosurgery unit?

14

234


47

187


Meikle et al.

402


after diagnosis represents suboptimal management. We

would suggest that if a hospital does not have access to an

MRI scanner, patients in whom an epidural haematoma is

suspected would most appropriately be sent for MRI scan

to a unit which has the capacity to operate.

Epidural haematomas are not common and early detec-

tion and treatment can make a profound difference to

outcome. Therefore, the authors believe that it is necessary

to have protocols for the management of suspected cases,

covering assessment of motor and sensory function, access

to MRI scanning, and referral to a neurosurgical unit. To

make the comparison with malignant hyperpyrexia, which

is similarly rare (1:40 000 patients),

12

there are widely



adopted protocols for its management. We believe that the

same practice should be used for epidural haematomas.

After reviewing the literature and examining practice, we

propose that a protocol for the diagnosis, investigation,

and management of epidural haematomas should include

the following elements:

(i) Patients with epidural infusions running should have

observations that include assessment of motor block

made at least every 4 h.

(ii) These observations should continue for at least 24 h

after removal of the epidural catheter.

(iii) There should be a designated person responsible for

investigating signs suggestive of epidural haematoma.

(iv) If significant deterioration in motor function occurs

in the absence of a recent bolus dose of local anaes-

thetic being administered, the designated person

should be contacted immediately.

(v) If motor block is attributed to a recent bolus dose of

epidural drugs, reassessment should occur within 2 h.

(vi) If an epidural infusion is running, it should be

turned off, alternative analgesia instigated as necess-

ary, and a reassessment of the patient’s motor func-

tion should be made after a defined interval. The

motor block would be expected to resolve if due to

overdose or catheter migration. If motor power does

not improve, remediable causes, including epidural

haematoma or abscess, must be excluded.

(vii) Once an epidural haematoma is suspected, an MRI

scan should be organized immediately, as this is a

potential

neurosurgical

emergency.

A

protocol


should be agreed in advance with the diagnostic

imaging service.

(viii) If MRI scanning is not available in the local hospi-

tal or there will be a delay, then the patient should

be referred to a neurosurgical unit to be scanned. It

may be appropriate to arrange a protocol with local

neurosurgical units to minimize delays in investi-

gation and treatment.

Acknowledgement

The authors would like to thank all those who completed and returned

the data collection forms.

Funding


This survey was funded by the Portsmouth Hospitals NHS

Trust Anaesthetic Department.

Appendix 1: Data collection form

Survey of management and investigation of spinal –

epidura haematomas secondary to epidural analgesia

1. Do you use epidurals for peri and postoperative

analgesia in your hospital?

A Yes A No

2. Do you run epidural infusions postoperatively?

A Yes A No

3. If yes, where are the patients managed?

A ITU A HDU A Ward

4. Do you have an aute pain service?

A Yes A No

5. Do you have a written protocol for running

postoperative epidural infusions?

A Yes A No

6. Does this include regular assessent of sensory level

and motor function?

A Yes A No

7. How frequently are these obsevations made?

A ,1H A 1 – 2H A 2 – 4H A 2 – 4H A .4H

8. Do they continue after the epidural is removed?

A Yes A No

9. If yes to question 8, for how long?

A 0 – 4H A 4 – 8H A 8 – 12H A .12H

10. Do you have a written protocol for the investigation of

abnormal motor block?

A Yes A No

11. Who takes responsibility for investigation of suspected

epidural haematomas?

A Surgical team A Pain nurse A Anaesthetic trainee

A Anaesthetic consultant

12. Do you have access to emergency MRI scanning 24

hours per day in your hospital?

A Yes A No

13. If the answer to question 12 is no, do you have access

to scaning 24 hours per day in another hospital?

A Yes A No

14. If the answer to question 13 is yes, is this hospital

your local spinal or neurosurgery unit?

A Yes A No

15. If you have answered yes to question 12 or 13, have

your radiologists agreed to provide urgent MRIs for

suspected epidural haematomas 24 hours per day?

A Yes A No

16. Do you have an investigation and treatment protocol

agreed with your local spinal surgery of neurosurgical

unit?

A Yes A No



Detection and management of epidural haematomas related to anaesthesia

403


17. Have you ever had an epidural haematoma related to

epidural anesthesia or analgesia in your hospital?

A Yes A No

18. If yes, was it diagnosed, investigated and treated

within 24 hours?

A Yes A No

19. If not where was the worst delay

A Clinical diagnosis

A Getting an MRI scan

A Waiting for transfer to spinal injury unit

Thank you!

Appendix 2: Frankel scale for spinal injury

scoring

American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment



scale (modified from Frankel).

A, complete. No sensory or motor function is preserved in

the sacral segments S4 – S5.

B, incomplete.

Sensory

but


not

motor


function

is

preserved below the neurological level and includes the



sacral segments S4 – S5.

C, incomplete. Motor function is preserved below the

neurological level and more than half of key muscles

below the neurological level have a muscle grade less

than three.

D, incomplete. Motor function is preserved below the

neurological level and at least half of key muscles

below the neurological level have a muscle grade

greater than or equal to three.

E, normal. Sensory and motor function are normal.

References

1 Cook T, Mihai R, Wildsmith JAW. A national census of central

neuraxial block in the UK: results of the snapshot phase of the

Third


National

Audit


Project

of

the



Royal

College


of

Anaesthetists. Anaesthesia 2008; 63: 143 – 6

2 Wulf H. Epidural anaesthesia and spinal haematoma. Can J Anaesth

1996; 43: 1260 – 71

3 Vandermeulen EP, Van Aken H, Vermelyn J. Anticoagulants

and spinal – epidural analgesia. Anesth Analg 1994; 79: 1165 – 77

4 Lawton MT, Porter RW, Heiserman EJ, et al. Surgical management

of spinal epidural haematoma: relationship between surgical

timing and neurological outcome. J Neurosurg 1995; 83: 1 – 7

5 Groen RJM, Van Alphen HAM. Operative treatment of spon-

taneous spinal epidural haematomas: a study of the factors

determining postoperative outcome. Neurosurgery 1996; 39:

494 – 508

6 Christie IW, McCabe S. Major complications of epidural analgesia

after surgery: results of a six-year survey. Anaesthesia 2007; 62:

335 – 41


7 Klement W, Rothe G, Peters J. Paraplegia following removal of an

epidural catheter. Reg Anaesth 1991; 14: 88 – 91

8 Ousmane ML, Fleyfel M, Vallet B. Epidural hematoma after catheter

removal. Anesth Analg 2000; 90: 1250

9 Sandhu H, Morley-Forster P, Spadafora S. Epidural hematoma

following epidural analgesia in a patient receiving unfractionated

heparin for thromboprophylaxis. Reg Anesth Pain Med 2000; 25:

72 – 5


10 Yin B, Barratt SM, Power I, Percy J. Epidural haematoma after

removal of an epidural catheter in a patient receiving high-dose

enoxaparin. Br J Anaesth 1999; 82: 288 – 90

11 Larsson EM, Holtas S, Cronqvist S. Emergency magnetic resonance

examination of patients with spinal cord symptoms. Acta Radiol

1988; 29: 69– 75

12 Abraham RB, Adnet P, Glauber V, Perel A. Malignant hyperthermia.

Postgrad Med J 1998; 74: 11– 7



Meikle et al.

404


Yüklə 85,58 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə