Resource Condition Report for a Significant Western Australian Wetland Wetlands of the Muggon ex-Pastoral Lease



Yüklə 0,76 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/4
tarix03.09.2017
ölçüsü0,76 Mb.
  1   2   3   4

 

 

Resource Condition Report for a 

Significant Western Australian Wetland 

Wetlands of the Muggon ex-Pastoral 

Lease 

2008 

 

 



Figure 1 – Muggon Lake. 

 

This report was prepared by: 

Glen Daniel, Environmental Officer, Department of Environment and Conservation, Locked 

Bag 104 Bentley Delivery Centre 6983 

Stephen  Kern,  Botanist,  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation,  Locked  Bag  104 

Bentley Delivery Centre 6983 

Adrian  Pinder,  Senior  Research  Scientist,  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation, 

PO Box 51, Wanneroo 6946 

 

Invertebrate sorting and identification was undertaken by: 



Nadine  Guthrie,  Research  Scientist,  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation,  PO 

Box 51, Wanneroo 6946 

Ross  Gordon,  Technical  Officer,  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation,  PO  Box 

51, Wanneroo 6946 

 

Prepared for: 

Inland  Aquatic  Integrity  Resource  Condition  Monitoring  Project,  Strategic  Reserve  Fund, 

Department of Environment and Conservation 

 

 



 

Version 3 (July 2009) 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Suggested Citation: 

DEC (2009). Resource Condition Report for a Significant Western Australian Wetland: Wetlands 



of  the  Muggon  ex-Pastoral  Lease.

 

Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation,  Perth, 



Australia. 

 

Contents

 

1.



 

Introduction.........................................................................................................................1

 

1.1.


 

Site Code ...............................................................................................................1

 

1.2.


 

Purpose of Resource Condition Report ...................................................................1

 

1.3.


 

Relevant Legislation and Policy ..............................................................................1

 

2.

 



Overview of the Muggon Wetlands ......................................................................................3

 

2.1.



 

Location and Cadastral Information ........................................................................3

 

2.2.


 

IBRA Region ..........................................................................................................3

 

2.3.


 

Climate...................................................................................................................3

 

2.4.


 

Wetland Type .........................................................................................................4

 

2.5.


 

Values of the Muggon Lakes ..................................................................................4

 

3.

 



Critical Components and Processes of the Ecology of Muggon Lake ...................................6

 

3.1.



 

Geology and Soils ..................................................................................................6

 

3.2.


 

Hydrology...............................................................................................................6

 

3.3.


 

Water Quality .........................................................................................................6

 

3.4.


 

Benthic Plants ........................................................................................................7

 

3.5.


 

Littoral Vegetation ..................................................................................................7

 

3.6.


 

Aquatic Invertebrates............................................................................................ 14

 

3.7.


 

Fish ...................................................................................................................... 15

 

3.8.


 

Waterbirds............................................................................................................ 15

 

3.9.


 

Terrestrial Vertebrates .......................................................................................... 16

 

4.

 



Threats to the Ecology of the Muggon Lakes ..................................................................... 16

 

5.



 

Knowledge Gaps and Recommendations for Future Monitoring......................................... 19

 

References................................................................................................................................ 20



 

Appendix 1 ................................................................................................................................ 21

 

Appendix 2 ................................................................................................................................ 22



 

 

 



1. Introduction 

This  Resource  Condition  Report  (RCR)  was  prepared  by  the  Inland  Aquatic  Integrity  Resource 

Condition Monitoring (IAI RCM) project. It describes the ecological character and condition of two 

wetlands  on  the  Muggon  ex-pastoral  lease.  Both  of  these  wetlands  lack  official  names  and  so 

have  been  allocated  descriptors  by  the  IAI  RCM  project.  The  first  survey  site  is  Muggon  Lake, 

one of a system of salt lakes that runs along the property’s western boundary. The second site is 

Muggon Claypan, an ephemeral, fresh, turbid claypan located near the Muggon homestead

.

 

The  sites  on  Muggon  were  selected  for  survey  by  the  IAI  RCM  project  because  they  are 



examples  of  two  wetland  types  that  are  typical  of  the  Murchison  bioregion.  Also,  the  data 

collected will contribute to an ongoing biological survey of the property that is monitoring changes 

in environmental conditions following the removal of stock. 

1.1.  Site Code 

Inland Aquatic Integrity Resource Condition Monitoring Project (DEC): 

RCM020 (Muggon Lake) 

RCM020b (Muggon Claypan) 



1.2.  Purpose of Resource Condition Report 

The  objective  of this  RCR is  to  provide  a  summary  of  information  relevant  to the  ecology  of  the 

wetlands  of the Muggon  ex-pastoral lease. This  information  is then used to  describe  the  drivers 

of, and threats to, these ecosystems. The resultant ‘snapshot’ of ecological character will provide 

context  for  future  monitoring  of  the  wetlands  and  assist  with  gauging  the  effectiveness  of 

management planning and actions on the property. 



1.3.  Relevant Legislation and Policy 

The following legislation and policy is relevant to the management of the Muggon wetlands: 



Western Australian state policy 

Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 

This Act provides for the  protection of wildlife. All fauna  (animals native  to Australia) in Western 

Australia  is  protected  under  section  14  and  all  flora  (plants  native  to  Western  Australia)  are 

protected  under  section  23  of  the  Wildlife  Conservation  Act  1950.  The  Act  establishes  licensing 

frameworks  for  the  taking  and  possession  of  protected  fauna,  and  establishes  offences  and 

penalties for interactions with fauna. 



Conservation and Land Management Act 1987 

This  Act  is  administered  by  the  State  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation  (DEC)  and 

applies  to  public  lands.  It  sets  the  framework  for  the  creation  and  management  of  marine  and 

terrestrial parks, reserves and management  areas in  Western  Australia, and provides protection 

for flora and fauna within reserve systems. 

Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972 

The purpose of this Act is to protect Aboriginal remains, relics and sites from undue interference, 

and to recognise the legitimate pursuit of Aboriginal customs and traditions. Under the Act, It is an 

offence for a person to excavate, destroy, damage or alter any Aboriginal site or artefact. The Act 

also allows for a representative body of persons of Aboriginal descent to make use of significant 

places for purposes sanctioned by the Aboriginal tradition relevant to those places. 



 

DEC Regional Boundary 



 

Figure  2  –  Aerial  photograph  showing  the  location  of  the  survey  sites  on  the  Muggon  ex-pastoral  lease.  The  upper  insert  shows  the 

location of the survey sites relative to the wetland system and surrounding tenure. The lower insert shows the location of all IAI RCM 

survey sites in Western Australia. 

Legend

!

A



RCM survey site

Minor Road

Track

Lake


Subject to Inundation

Nature Reserve

Crown Lease

Crown Reserve

Unallocated Crown Land

Other Crown Reserves

Unallocated Crown Land

Pastoral Leases



 



2. Overview of the Muggon Wetlands 



2.1.  Location and Cadastral Information 

The  Muggon  ex-pastoral  lease  lies  approximately  20  km  northwest  of  the  Murchison  settlement 

and  covers  an  area  of  182,743  ha.  The  property  was  a  pastoral  lease  until  acquired  by  the 

Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation  (DEC)  in  the  mid-1990s.  This  land  will  eventually 

become  part  of  the  conservation  estate  but  is  currently  Unallocated  Crown  Land,  managed  by 

DEC.  Much  of  Muggon  is  bounded  by  active  pastoral  leases,  although  the  southwest  corner  of 

the property abuts Toolonga Nature Reserve. 

The  two  wetlands  that  were  surveyed  are  both  southwest  of  the  homestead,  on  the  track  that 

leads to the Muggon Road tank. The claypan is approximately 3.5 km from the homestead and is 

the  first  claypan  crossed  by  that  track.  The  lake  is  the  northernmost  of  the  two  large  salt  lakes 

near the property’s western boundary. The survey location is near the point that the track passes 

the southern edge of the lake. 



2.2.  IBRA Region 

Muggon  lies  on  the  western  edge  of  the  western  subregion  (MUR2)  of  the  Murchison  Interim 

Bioregionalisation  of  Australia  (IBRA)  region.  This  subregion  contains  the  headwaters  of  the 

Murchison and Wooramel Rivers, which drain the subregion westwards to the coast. 

The  Western  Murchison  is  on  the  Yilgarn  Craton  and  the  underlying  geology  is  dominated  by 

granite  with  greenstone  intrusions.  These  are  overlain  by  extensive  hardpan  washplains. 

Surfaces associated with the occluded drainage also occur throughout the subregion. 

Mulga low woodlands, often rich in ephemerals and usually with bunch grasses, occur on alluvial 

and eluvial surfaces. Hummock grasslands are found on areas of sandplain, saltbush shrublands 

on calcareous soils and Halosarcia low shrublands on saline alluvia. (Desmond et al. 2001). 

The most extensive vegetation types present on Muggon are shrublands dominated by bowgada 

(Acacia  ramulosa)  scrub,  succulent  steppe  with  open  scrub,  and  scattered  mulga  and  other 



Acacia species over saltbush and bluebush (Meinema et al. 2000). 

2.3.  Climate 

The  nearest  Bureau  of  Meteorology  weather  station  to  Muggon  is  at  the  Murchison  settlement 

(Bureau  of  Meteorology  2009). Weather conditions  at  Muggon  would  not  differ  appreciably  from 

those at Murchison. 

Murchison  experiences  an  arid  climate.  It  receives  a  mean  annual  rainfall  of  244.7  mm,  in  a 

bimodal  pattern  (Figure  3).  Summer  rainfall  is  usually  associated  with  decaying  tropical  lows, 

while winter rainfall results from the occasional cold fronts that penetrate the state’s interior. Daily 

evaporation is not recorded at Murchison, but would be expected to be many times greater than 

rainfall, meaning that surface water is short lived after rain. Temperatures peak in January with a 

mean daily minimum/maximum of 22.8 ºC/39.2 ºC and fall to 6.1 ºC/20.9 ºC in July. 

The Muggon  wetlands were surveyed by the IAI RCM project on the 23

rd

 of August 2008. In the 



six  months  preceding  the  survey,  Murchison  received  331.1 mm  of  rain.  Much  of  this  (183  mm) 

fell in February, with the last rain recorded on the 31

st

 of July. 



 

0



5

10

15



20

25

30



35

40

45



Jan

Feb


Mar

Apr


May

Jun


Jul

Aug


Sep

Oct


Nov

Dec


T

e

m

p

e

ra

tu

re

 (

ºC

)

0

5



10

15

20



25

30

35



40

R

a

in

fa

ll

 (

m

m

)

Mean Rain

Mean Max T

Mean Min T



 

Figure  3  –  Climatic  averages  for  Murchison,  approximately  55  km  southeast  of  Muggon 

Lake. 

 

2.4.  Wetland Type 

Under  the  categorisation  used  by  the  Directory  of  Important  Wetlands  in  Australia  (DIWA) 

(Environment  Australia  2001),  the  Muggon  Lake  System  may  be  described  as 

seasonal/intermittent  saline  lakes

 

(type  B8)  and  seasonal  saline  marshes  (Type  B12).  Muggon 



Lake  is  a  megascale  irregular  elongate  lake  stretching  approximately  10 km  north to  south. It  is 

surrounded  by  scattered  mesoscale  salt  pans.  Muggon  Claypan  would  be  classed  as  a 

seasonal/intermittent  freshwater  pond  on  inorganic  soils  (DIWA  type  B10).  It  is  a  round, 

freshwater, turbid claypan, approximately 350 m in diameter. 



2.5.  Values of the Muggon Lakes 

Values  are  the  internal  principles  that  guide  the  behaviour  of  an  individual  or  group.  Value 

systems  determine  the  importance  people  place  on  the  natural  environment  and  how  they  view 

their place within it. Divergent values may result in people pursuing different objectives in relation 

to  nature  conservation,  having  different  reasons  for  desiring  a  commonly  agreed  outcome,  or 

favouring  different  mechanisms  to  achieve  this  outcome.  Because  of  this,  it  is  important  to  be 

explicit about the values that are driving conservation activities at a wetland. 

The  Conceptual  Framework  for  Managing  Natural  Biodiversity  in  the  Western  Australian 

Wheatbelt (Wallace 2003) identified eight reasons that humans value natural biodiversity: 

a. 

Consumptive use 

Consumptive  use  is  gaining  benefit  from  products  derived  from  the  natural  environment 

without  these  products  going  through  a  market  place,  for  example,  the  collection  and 

personal  use  of  firewood  or  ‘bushtucker’.  No  specific  information  is  available  regarding 

consumptive use of the Muggon wetlands, but Local Aboriginal people, the Nanda language 

group,  value  the  consumptive  use  of  the  broad  Muggon  area.  Hunting  and  gathering 



 

activities conducted on Yallalong and Muggon, particularly around the Badgeradda Ranges, 



are described in the 2001 Native Title determination (National Native Title Tribunal. 2001). 

b. 

Productive use 

Productive use values are derived from market transactions involving products derived from 

the natural environment. For example, firewood may be collected and sold or exchanged for 

another  commodity,  or  commercial  cattle  may  be  grazed  on  native  grasses.  Muggon  has  a 

history  of  use  by  the  pastoral  industry,  but  has  been  destocked  and  no  longer  delivers 

productive use value. 



c. 

Opportunities for future use 

Not all  uses  of the natural  environment may  be  apparent at the present  time. The potential 

for  future  benefit  from  the  natural  environment  is  maximised  by  maintaining  the  greatest 

possible biodiversity. The loss of taxa or ecosystems represents lost opportunities. Muggon 

Lake  may support endemic or  rare taxa. Such unique features would increase the potential 

for future opportunities to present. 



d. 

Ecosystem services 

There are many naturally occurring phenomena that bring enormous benefit to mankind. For 

instance,  plants generate oxygen, insects pollinate food crops  and  wetlands mitigate floods 

by  regulating  water  flows.  The  term  ‘ecosystem  services’,  is  used  as  a  broad  umbrella  to 

cover  the  myriad  of  benefits  delivered,  directly  or  indirectly,  to  humankind  by  healthy 

ecosystems.

 

The  Muggon  wetlands  would  make  a  relatively  small  contribution  to  the 



ecosystem services delivered by the broader region. That said, given the parlous state of the 

global environment, every small contribution is important. 



e. 

Amenity 

Amenity  describes  features  of  the  natural  environment  that  make  life  more  pleasant  for 

people.  For  instance,  pleasant  views,  shade  and  wind  shelter  from  a  stand  of  trees.  It  is 

difficult to quantify the amenity value of isolated sites such as the Muggon wetlands, but the 

Murchison  region  is  increasing  in  popularity  as  a  tourist  destination.  At  the  time  of  the  IAI 

RCM  survey,  there  were  a  large  number  of  native  plants  in  flower,  providing  spectacular 

scenery. 

f. 

Scientific and educational uses 

Parts  of  the  natural  environment  that  remain  relatively  unmodified  by  human  activity 

represent  great  educational  opportunities.  Such  sites  allow  us  to  learn  about  changes 

occurring  elsewhere  in  the  natural  world.  They  also  act  as  ‘control’  sites  that  allow  us  to 

benchmark  other,  altered  habitats.

 

The  Muggon  wetlands  are  relatively  unmodified  saline 



and freshwater wetlands that may present opportunities for advancing the science of wetland 

ecology. 



g. 

Recreation 

Many  recreational  activities  rely  on  the  natural  environment  (bird  watching,  canoeing, 

wildflower  tourism,  etc.)  or  are  greatly  enhanced  by  it  (hiking,  cycling,  horse  riding, 

photography,  etc.).  Recreation  may  deliver  economic  benefit  such  as  income  derived  from 

tourism, and also delivers spiritual and physical health benefits to the recreator. Muggon is a 

popular  stopover  for  tourists  in  the  Murchison  region  and  the  wetlands  provide  recreational 

opportunities. 

h. 

Spiritual/philosophical values 

People’s  spiritual  and  philosophical  reasons  for  valuing  natural  environment  are  numerous 

and diverse. One commonly cited is the ‘sense of place’ that people derive from elements of 

their  environment.  This  is  evident  in  many  Aboriginal  and  rural  Australians,  who  strongly 

identify themselves with their natural environment. Many people also believe that nature has 


 

inherent value, or a right to exist that is independent of any benefit delivered to humans. A 



sense  of  spiritual  well-being  may  be  derived  from  the  knowledge  of  healthy  environments, 

even  if the individual has no contact with them.

 

The  Muggon area is of cultural  significance 



to  the local Aboriginal  people.  Although  no registered heritage sites lie on  the  property, the 

2001  Native  Title  determination  describes  the  spiritual  value  attached  to  the  landscape  by 

the Nanda people (National Native Title Tribunal. 2001). 

The  intent  of  nature  conservation  is  usually  to  maintain  the  ecosystem  services,  scientific  and 

educational  uses  and  opportunities  for  future  uses  at  a  given  site.  Doing  so  is  likely  to  have 

positive  effects  on  the  amenity,  recreational  use  and  spiritual/philosophical  values  to  which  the 

site’s  natural  environment  contributes.  Consumptive  and  productive  uses  of  the  natural 

environment  are  not  usually  considered,  as  these  are  often  incompatible  with  nature 

conservation. 

3. Critical Components and Processes of the Ecology of 

Muggon Lake 

The objective of the Muggon Wetlands RCR is to compile information  relevant to the ecology of 

the  wetlands’  ecosystems.  By  doing  so,  it  is  possible  to  identify  the  critical  components  and 

drivers  of  the  wetlands.  These  components  and  processes  determine  the  sites’  ecological 

character and are the variables that should be assessed in any ongoing monitoring. 

Climate  and  geomorphology  are  the  most  important  drivers  of  wetland  ecosystems.  Between 

them,  these  factors  determine  the  position  of  a  wetland  in  the  landscape  and  the  type  and 

hydrological  regime  of  that  wetland.  In  turn,  a  wetland’s  position,  type  and  hydrology  exert  a 

strong influence on its biota and biochemical properties and processes. 

A  summary  of  Muggon  Wetlands’  critical  ecosystem  components  follows,  along  with  a  detailed 

description of the results of the IAI RCM 2008 survey and of any previous studies conducted on 

these wetlands. 




Yüklə 0,76 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə