Resource Condition Report for a Significant Western Australian Wetland Lake MacLeod System 2009



Yüklə 2,51 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü2,51 Mb.
  1   2   3

 

 

Resource Condition Report for a 

Significant Western Australian Wetland 

Lake MacLeod System 

2009 

 

 



 

 

 



Figure 1 – The ‘Northern Ponds’ at Lake MacLeod. 

 

This report was prepared by: 

Glen Daniel, Environmental Officer, Department of Environment and Conservation, Locked 

Bag 104 Bentley Delivery Centre 6983 

Stephen  Kern,  Botanist,  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation,  Locked  Bag  104 

Bentley Delivery Centre 6983 

Adrian  Pinder,  Senior  Research  Scientist,  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation, 

PO Box 51, Wanneroo 6946 

Anna  Nowicki,  Technical  Officer,  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation,  PO  Box 

51, Wanneroo 6946 

 

Invertebrate sorting and identification was undertaken by: 



Nadine  Guthrie,  Research  Scientist,  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation,  PO 

Box 51, Wanneroo 6946 

Ross  Gordon,  Technical  Officer,  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation,  PO  Box 

51, Wanneroo 6946 

 

Prepared for: 

Inland  Aquatic  Integrity  Resource  Condition  Monitoring  Project,  Strategic  Reserve  Fund, 

Department of Environment and Conservation 

 

 



 

August 2009 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Suggested Citation: 

Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation  (DEC)  (2009),  Resource  Condition  Report  for  a 



Significant Western Australian Wetland: Lake MacLeod System.

 

Department of Environment and 



Conservation. Perth, Western Australia. 

 

Contents

 

1.



 

Introduction ............................................................................................................................. 4

 

1.1.


 

Site Code ................................................................................................................... 4

 

1.2.


 

Purpose of a Resource Condition Report .................................................................. 4

 

1.3.


 

Relevant Legislation and Policy ................................................................................. 4

 

2.

 



Overview of the Lake MacLeod System ................................................................................. 8

 

2.1.



 

Location and Cadastral Information ........................................................................... 8

 

2.2.


 

IBRA Region .............................................................................................................. 8

 

2.3.


 

Climate ....................................................................................................................... 8

 

2.4.


 

Wetland Type ............................................................................................................. 9

 

2.5.


 

Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia Criteria ............................................... 10

 

3.

 



Results of the IAI RCM Survey at Lake MacLeod ................................................................ 10

 

3.1.



 

Water Chemistry ...................................................................................................... 10

 

3.2.


 

Benthic Plants .......................................................................................................... 11

 

3.3.


 

Littoral Vegetation .................................................................................................... 11

 

3.4.


 

Aquatic Invertebrates ............................................................................................... 16

 

3.5.


 

Waterbirds ................................................................................................................ 19

 

3.6.


 

Other Fauna ............................................................................................................. 19

 

4.

 



Threats to Ecology of the Lake MacLeod System ............................................................ 19

 

References .................................................................................................................................... 21



 

Appendix - Vegetation Data ........................................................................................................... 22

 

 


 

1. Introduction 

This  Resource  Condition  Report  (RCR)  was  prepared  by  the  Inland  Aquatic  Integrity  Resource 

Condition  Monitoring  (IAI  RCM)  project.  It  discusses  the  ecological  character  and  condition  of 

Lake  MacLeod,  an  expansive  and  complex  wetland  system  in  the  Gascoyne  region.  The  Lake 

MacLeod system incorporates a number of different wetland types, including sinkholes, channels, 

lakes  and  marshes  that  are  permanently  inundated  due  to  a  subterranean  connection  with  the 

ocean.  The main  lake  bed  is  primarily  fed  by  surface  water  and  inundated  only  following  heavy 

rain in the catchment. This association of wetland types is unique in Australia. 

The  Lake  MacLeod  System  was  selected  as  a  study  site  for  the  IAI  RCM  project  because  it  is 

proposed  for  listing  under  the  Ramsar  International  Convention  on  Wetlands  as  a  Wetland  of 

International  Importance.  Lake  MacLeod  is  currently  recognised  as  nationally  significant  and  is 

listed  in  the  Directory  of  Important  Wetlands  in  Australia  (DIWA)  (Environment  Australia  2001). 

DIWA  recognises  Lake  MacLeod  as  ‘an  outstanding  example  of  a  major  coastal  lake  that  is 

episodically  inundated  by  fresh  water,  and  includes  permanent  saline  wetlands  and  inland 

mangrove  swamps  that  are  maintained  by  subterranean  waterways’.  The  lake  is  also  a  major 

migration stop-over and drought refuge area for shorebirds. Finally, the area supports Australia's 

largest inland community of mangroves and associated fauna. 

The  current  report  considers  two  sites  within  the  Lake  MacLeod  System:  Jacks  Vent  and  Goat 

Bay. These are both areas where ‘vents’ maintain a subterranean connection between the ocean 

and  the  lake.  They  are  within  the  northern  part  of  the  system,  known  as  the  ‘Northern  Ponds’ 

(Figure 2). 

1.1.  Site Code 

Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia: WA009. 

Register of the National Estate Place ID: 10784. 

Inland Aquatic Integrity Resource Condition Monitoring Project (DEC): 

Jacks Vent - RCM029A; 

Goat Bay – RCM029B. 

Carnarvon Basin Survey (DEC): 

 

Jacks Vent – CBS079; 



 

Goat Bay – CBS076. 



1.2.  Purpose of a Resource Condition Report 

The objective of this RCR is to supplement the Lake MacLeod Ecological Character Description 

(ECD) (unpublished) by  providing the results of a survey conduced at  the site  in October  2008. 

While a brief overview of the entire wetland system is provided in this report, the survey results 

will  concentrate  on  Jacks  Vent  and  Goat  Bay.  It  is  recommended  the  reader  refer  to  the  Lake 

MacLeod  ECD  for  more  detailed  information  on  the  system  and  for  data  collected  in  previous 

surveys. 

1.3.  Relevant Legislation and Policy 

The following is a summary of legislation and policy that may be relevant to the management of 

the Lake MacLeod System. 

 

 

 


 

International 

Migratory bird bilateral agreements and international conventions 

Australia  is  party  to  a  number  of  bilateral  agreements,  initiatives  and  conventions  for  the 

conservation of migratory birds and wetlands that are relevant to the Lake MacLeod System. The 

bilateral agreements are: 



JAMBA - The Agreement between the Government of Australia and the Government of Japan for 

the Protection of Migratory Birds in Danger of Extinction and their Environment, 1974; 



CAMBA  -  The  Agreement  between  the  Government  of  Australia  and  the  Government  of  the 

People’s Republic of China for the Protection of Migratory Birds and their Environment, 1986; 



ROKAMBA - The Agreement between the Government of Australia and the Republic of Korea for 

the Protection of Migratory Birds and their Environment, 2006; 



The Bonn Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) - The Bonn Convention adopts a framework in 

which countries  with jurisdiction over any  part of the range of a particular species co-operate to 

prevent migratory species becoming endangered. For Australian purposes, many of the species 

are migratory birds; and 



Convention  on  Wetlands  (Ramsar)  -  Australia  a  signatory  to  the  Ramsar  Convention,  an 

intergovernmental  treaty  which  provides  the  framework  for  national  action  and  international 

cooperation  for  the  conservation  and  wise  use  of  wetlands  and  their  resources.  The  Lake 

MacLeod  System,  in  particular  the  northern  ponds,  is  proposed  for  listing  under  the  Ramsar 

Convention so this convention may have further relevance in the future. 

National legislation 

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) 

The  EPBC  Act  is  the  Australian  Government's  principal  piece  of  environmental  legislation.  It 

provides a  legal framework to protect and manage  nationally  and  internationally  important flora, 

fauna,  ecological  communities  and  heritage  places.  These  are  defined  in  the  Act  as  matters  of 

national environmental significance. 

There are seven matters of national environmental significance to  which the  EPBC  Act applies. 

Of  these,  one  applies  at  Lake  MacLeod:  migratory  species  listed  under  international  treaties 

JAMBA, CAMBA and CMS. 

The northern portion of the Lake MacLeod System is also a proposed Ramsar site (Figure 3). If 

this  listing  is  achieved,  the  site  will  be  further  protected  under  the  EPBC  Act  as  a  wetland  of 

international significance. 

Western Australian state legislation 

Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 

The Wildlife Conservation Act provides for the protection of flora and fauna in Western Australia. 

All fauna are protected under section 14 and all flora are protected under section 23 of the Act. 

The Act establishes licensing frameworks for the taking and possession of protected fauna, and 

establishes offences and penalties for interactions with fauna. 


 

DEC Regional Boundary 

 

 

Figure 2 – Aerial photograph showing the survey locations at Lake MacLeod. The upper insert provides cadastral information about the 

lake and its surrounds. The lower insert shows the location of the lake in Western Australia and its proximity to other RCM survey sites.

Legend

x

WA Townsites



!

A

RCM survey site



Principal Road

Minor Road

Track

Lake


Salt Evaporator

Subject to Inundation

Watercourse

DIWA Site

5(1)(h) Reserve

Former Leasehold

Marine Park

Other Crown Reserves

Unallocated Crown Land

Pastoral Leases

!

!

!



Live Mine Tenement

!

!



!

!

!



!

Pending Mine Tenement

Jacks Vent 

RCM029A 


Goat Bay 

RCM029B 


 

 

Figure 3 – The Lake MacLeod System, showing the proposed Ramsar site. 



 

2. Overview of the Lake MacLeod System 

2.1.  Location and Cadastral Information 

The Lake MacLeod system includes distinct ‘inner wetlands’ (sinkholes, channels, lakes, marshes) in the 

west and ‘floodout marshes’ at river mouths in the north east, as well as the lake bed (Jaensch, 1992). 

The southern extent of the system is approximately 30 km north northwest of Carnarvon and, from here, 

the  main  lake  body  runs  parallel  to  the  coast  for  approximately  120  km. The  total  area  covered  by  the 

wetland system is approximately 2,000 km

2



The  Lake  MacLeod  System  straddles  the  Gnaraloo,  Minilya,  Quobba,  Boologoora  and  Boolathana 



pastoral leases. The southern half of the lake floor is Unallocated Crown Land, while the northern half is 

a ‘water feature’ that is not vested in any management authority. Dampier Salt Pty Ltd holds a live mining 

tenement over the entire system and runs a salt mine at the southern end of the lake bed. There is also a 

small aquaculture venture in that area, farming the alga Dunaliella salina. 



2.2.  IBRA Region 

The Lake MacLeod System lies at the north west of the Carnarvon Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation 

of Australia (IBRA) region. The Carnarvon subregion consists of quaternary alluvial, aeolian and marine 

sediments  overlying  Cretaceous  strata.  Vegetation  of  the  subregion  includes  mosaics  of  saline  alluvial 

plants with samphire and saltbush low shrublands; Bowgada low woodland on sandy ridges and plains; 

snake wood shrubs on clay flats; and tree to shrub steppe over hummock grasslands on red sand dune 

fields. Limestone strata with Acacia startii/bivenosa shrublands outcrop in the north of the subregion, with 

extensive tidal flats in sheltered embayments. 



2.3.  Climate 

The  nearest  Bureau  of  Meteorology  weather  station  to  Lake  MacLeod  is  at  Carnarvon  Airport, 

approximately  50  km  to  the  south  (Bureau  of  Meteorology  2009).  Carnarvon  experiences  a  semi-arid 

climate, with a mean annual rainfall of 228 mm. Rainfall is most reliably received between May and July, 

but summer storms can occur in association with the passage of tropical lows or cyclones. Temperatures 

peak in February with mean maxima/minima of 32.5 ºC/23.3 ºC and fall to 22.2 ºC/11 ºC in July (Figure 

4).  Mean  annual  evaporation  is  3,212  mm.  In  the  twelve  months  preceding  the  IAI  RCM  survey  of  the 

Lake MacLeod System, Carnarvon Airport received 228.2 mm of rain. 



 

 

0



5

10

15



20

25

30



35

Jan


Feb

Mar


Apr

May


Jun

Jul


Aug

Sep


Oct

Nov


Dec

0

10



20

30

40



50

60

M ean Rain



M ean M ax T

M ean M in T

 

Figure 4 – Climatic means for Carnarvon Airport, 50 km south of Lake MacLeod. 

2.4.  Wetland Type 

The  Directory  of  Important  Wetlands  in  Australia  (Environment  Australia  2001)  describes  the  Lake 

MacLeod System as comprising eight main wetland types: 

• 

Permanent saline/brackish lakes (type B7). 



• 

Seasonal/intermittent saline lakes (type B8). 

• 

Inland sub-terrain karst wetlands (type B19). 



• 

Salt exploitation, salt pans, saline (type B4). 

• 

Permanent saline/brackish marshes (type B11). 



• 

Seasonal saline marches (type B12). 

• 

Seasonal/intermittent freshwater ponds and marches on inorganic soils; includes sloughs, 



potholes; seasonal flooded meadows, sedge marshes (type B10). 

• 

Intertidal forested wetlands; includes mangrove swamps, nipa swamps, tidal freshwater swamp 



forests (type A9). 

The  northern  pools,  where  surveys  for  this  report  were  conducted,  comprise  intermittently  inundated, 

brackish to saline flats surrounding a series of saline springs and associated permanent saline channels 

and lagoons. 

 

 

T

e



m

p

e



ra

tu

re



 (

ºC



R

a

in



fa

ll 


(m

m



 

2.5.  Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia Criteria 

The Lake MacLeod System is currently identified as a wetland of national importance under criteria 1, 2, 

3, 4 and 6 of the Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia (DIWA). These criteria are as follows: 

1. 


It is a good example of a wetland type occurring within a biogeographic region in Australia. 

The  Lake  MacLeod  System  is  an  outstanding  example  of  a  major  coastal  lake  that  is  episodically 

inundated by fresh water, which includes permanent saline wetlands and inland mangrove swamps 

that  are  maintained  by  subterranean  waterways  -  a  unique  assemblage  of  wetland  types  in 

Australia. 

2. 


It is a wetland that plays an important ecological or hydrological role in the natural functioning of a 

major wetland system/complex. 

3. 

It is a wetland that is important as the habitat for animal taxa at a vulnerable stage in their life cycles, 



or provides a refuge when adverse conditions such as drought prevail. 

The Lake  MacLeod system is a major migration stop-over and drought refuge  area for shorebirds, 

including  Banded  Stilt  (Caldorhynchus  leucocephalus),  Curlew  Sandpiper  (Calidris  ferruginea)  and 

Red-necked  Stint  (Calidris  rufilcollis).  It  also  supports  Australia's  largest  inland  community  of 

mangroves and associated fauna. 

4.  The wetland supports 1% or more of the national populations of any native plant or animal taxa. 



Surveys  at  Lake  MacLeod  have  recorded  as  many  as  111,600  shorebirds  and  114,956  waterbirds 

belonging  to  fifty-eight  different  species.  The  system  supports  more  than  1%  of  the  national 

population of the following shorebirds: 

• 

Banded Stilt (Cladorhynchus leucocephalus); 

• 

Curlew Sandpiper (Calidris ferruginea); 

• 

Red-necked Stint (Calidris ruficollis); 

• 

Red Knot (Calidris canutus); 

• 

Pied Cormorant (Phalacrocorax melanoleucos); 

• 

Red-necked Avocet (Recurvirostra novaehollandiae); 

• 

Red -capped Plover (Charadrius ruficapillus); and 

• 

Australian Pelican (Pelecanus conspicillatus). 

6. 


The wetland is of outstanding historical or cultural significance. 

3. Results of the IAI RCM Survey at Lake MacLeod 

Lake MacLeod was surveyed by the IAI RCM project on 11

th

 October 2008. The objective of the survey 



was to document the vegetation, water chemistry, aquatic fauna and impacts of threatening processes at 

Jacks Vent and Goat Bay. The results this survey discussed below. 



3.1.  Water Chemistry 

The chemical properties of water in the Lake Macleod System are strongly influenced by the hydrological 

influxes to the system. There are two main sources of water for the lake: subterranean vents that connect 

with the ocean and rivers that arise in the Gascoyne. Water from each of these sources has properties 

that are quite different from the other. 

Along  the  north  western  margin  of  the  main  lake  are  several  ‘vents’  that  provide  a  subterranean 

connection to the ocean. These vents are lower than sea level, allowing water to flow through fractures in 

the bedrock into the lake under hydrostatic pressure. The areas surrounding these vents are permanently 



 

inundated by water with very similar chemical properties to seawater. Water flows away from the vents 

into the body of the main lake, where salts and other chemicals are concentrated by evaporation. 

The  other  major  input  of  water  to  the  Lake  MacLeod  System  is  relatively  fresh  water  inflow  from  a 

number of creeks and rivers on the lake’s eastern side. The Minilya and Lyndon River catchments drain 

into  Lake  MacLeod  following  heavy  rainfall  events,  usually  associated  with  the  passage  of  tropical 

cyclones. This water is relatively fresh but may be somewhat nutrient enriched. 

The two locations surveyed by the IAI RCM project are both within the area of marine influence. Jack’s 

Vent  is  located  directly  at  a  vent  and  the  water  here  was  very  similar  in  composition  to  seawater  (pH 

9.79,  TDS  39  gL

-1

).  Goat  Bay  is  nearby,  in  an  area  where  ions  in  the  water  are  evapoconcentrated  as 



water  moves  from  the  vents  onto  the  main  lake  floor.  Water  chemistry  here  reflected  this  process  of 

evapoconcentration (pH 7.97, TDS 50 gL

-1

). Nutrient concentrations at both locations were low (Table 1), 



reflecting the lack of recent river flow (Table 1). 

Table 1 – Water chemistry parameters  recorded during the Carnarvon Basin Surveys (CBS)  and 

Inland Aquatic Integrity Resource Condition Monitoring project survey (RCM) at Lake MacLeod. 

CBS076

CBS076

RCM029B

CBS079

CBS079

RCM029A

Aug 1994

Mar 1995

Oct 2008

Oct 1994

Mar 1995

Oct 2008

pH

8.2


7.9

7.97


7.3

7.2


9.79

Alkalinity (mg/L)

130


130

TDS (g/L)

46

53



50

41

40



39

Turbidity (NTU)

0.26


3.6

1

0.05



0.6

0.25


Colour (TCU)

9

13



8

12

17



3

Total nitrogen (ug/L)

470


460

Total phosphorus (ug/L)

5

5



Total soluble nitrogen (ug/L)

510


550

380


480

280


270

Total soluble phosphorus (ug/L)

10

10



5

5

5



5

Chlorophyll (ug/L)

42

2



2

0

0



2

Na (mg/L)

15,800


12,300

Mg (mg/L)

1,890


1,480

Ca (mg/L)

638


487

K (mg/L)

580


447

Cl (mg/L)

26,600


21,300

SO4 (mg/L)

4,140


3,150

HCO3 (mg/L)

159


159

CO3 (mg/L)

0.5


0.5

 

3.2.  Benthic Plants 

Aquatic plants were not collected at either survey location. Algal mats were observed at both Jacks Vent 

and Goat Bay, but the species of algae was not identified. 



3.3.  Littoral Vegetation 

There  were  three  vegetation  transects  established:  one  adjacent  to  Jacks  Vent,  the  other  two  at  Goat 

Bay. The location and attributes of these transects are summarised in Table 2 and expanded on in the 

following subsections. 

 

 

 



 

 


 

Table 2 –Attributes of the vegetation transects established at Lake MacLeod by the Inland Aquatic 

Integrity Resource Condition Monitoring project.

 

Transect name 

RCM029A-R1 

(Jack’s Vent 1) 

RCM029B-R1 

(Goat Bay 1) 

RCM029B-R2 

(Goat Bay 2) 

Datum 

WGS84 


WGS84 

WGS84 


Zone 

49 


49 

49 


Easting 

769671 


765672 

765718 


Northing 

7352191 


7347644 

7347607 


Length 

30 m 


30 m 

50 m 


Bearing 

210 



210 

Wetland state 

Full 

Full 


Full 

Soil state (%) 

Dry 



100 



Waterlogged 

100 



100 



Inundated 



Substrate (%) 

Bare 



60 



95 

Rock 




Cryptogam 



Litter 




Trash 



Logs 




Time since last fire 

no evidence 

no evidence 

no evidence 

Community condition 

Natural 


Natural 

Natural 


Upper Stratum 

Cover (%) 

4.43333 

2.83773 



Height (m) 



1.5 

Mid Stratum 

Cover (%) 

89.8333 


39.2333 

2.36 


Height (m) 

<0.5 

<0.5 

<0.4 

Ground Cover 

Cover (%) 



Height (m) 





 

Jacks Vent Transect RCM029A-R1 

This transect was established in vegetation on the margins of Jacks Vent, a pool where seawater enters 

the lake system (Figure 4). The clay soils were waterlogged at the time of survey. The tallest vegetative 

stratum  was  Avicennia  marina  low  sparse  mangrove  shrubland  (4.4%  cover,  1 m  tall).  However, 

vegetation  along  the  transect  was  dominated  by  Tecticornia  peltata,  T.  pruinosa,  T.  pergranulata  low 

closed samphire shrubland (89.8% cover, <0.5 m tall). Table 3 provides a complete list of taxa recorded 

along the transect RCM029A-R1. 

The mangroves on the transect were all young plants no taller than 1 m. Dead mangroves, which are up 

to  3  m  tall,  were  abundant  near  the  water’s  edge  (Figure  5).  These  deaths  were  caused  by  a  flooding 

event in February/March 2000 (D. Bauer pers. comm.). This disturbance is part of the natural ecology of 

the lake, and so, the overall community condition was considered ‘natural’ (Table 9). 

Further back from Jacks Vent the mudflats were largely devoid of vegetation, with occasional clumps of 

samphires and mangroves. 


 

 

Figure 4 – Samphire shrubland along vegetation transect RCM029A at Jack’s Vent. 



 

 

Figure 5 – Mangrove deaths near vegetation transect RCM029A-R1. 

 

Table  3  –  Plant  taxa  recorded  on  the  Jacks  Vent  vegetation  transect  RCM029A-R1  (in  order  of 

stratum then dominance). 

Genus 

Species 

Height (m)  Stratum

1

 

Form 

Avicennia 

marina 

U1 



Shrub 

Tecticornia 

peltata 

0.4 


M1 

Chenopod 



Tecticornia 

pruinosa 

0.4 


M1 

Chenopod 



Tecticornia 

?pergranulata 

0.4 


M1 

Chenopod 



Muellerolimon 

salicorniaceum 

0.2 


M1 

Shrub 


In  an  NVIS  description, ‘U’  denotes the  upper  storey,  ‘M’ the mid storey  and  ‘G’ the  under  storey  (ground  cover).  Numerals  to 

denote substrata from tallest (ESCAVI 2003). 

? Limited confidence in identification. 


 

According  to  the  National  Vegetation  Information  System  (NVIS),  the  vegetation  community  at  Jack’s 

Vent may be described as (ESCAVI 2003): 

U1  ^Avicennia  marina\shrub  (mangrove)\3\r;  M1+  ^Tecticornia  peltata,  T.  pruinosa,  T. ?pergranulata



Muellerolimon salicorniaceum\samphire shrub, shrub\1\d. 

 

Goat Bay Transect RCM029B-R1 

This transect was established approximately 80 m from the water’s edge at Goats Bay to the west of the 

main  lake.  The  soil  was  waterlogged  at  the  time  of  survey.  Vegetation  was  dominated  by  Tecticornia 



halocnemoides,  T.  sp.,  Muellerolimon  salicorniaceum  low  open  shrubland  (39.2%  cover,  <0.5 m  tall). 

Table 4 provides a complete list of taxa recorded along the transect RCM029B-R1. 

Despite  the  presence  of  stock  and  feral  goats  in  the  area,  no  significant  degradation  of  the  vegetation 

was evident. The overall community condition was considered ‘natural’ (Table 9). 

The landscape surrounding Goat Bay  is generally flat and samphire-dominated  vegetation covers large 

expanses (Figure 6). Further from the water’s edge at Goat Bay, low shrubland continues but samphires 

become  less  dominant.  Shrubs  common  to  this  area  include  Atriplex  vesicaria,  A.  amnicola,  Frankenia 

paucifloraF. cinereaNeobassia astrocarpa and Maireana appressa. The grasses Eragrostis dielsii and 

E. pergracilis were also abundant. Acacia synchronicia forms a taller shrub layer nearby dune tops. 

 

Figure 6 – Samphire-dominated vegetation along vegetation transect RCM029B-R1. 



 

Table  4  –  Plant  taxa  recorded  along  Goats  Bay  vegetation  transect  RCM029B-R1  (in  order  of 

dominance). 

Genus 

Species 

Height (m) 

Stratum

1

 

Form 

Tecticornia 

halocnemoides 

0.4 


M1 

Chenopod 



Tecticornia 

sp. 


0.4 

M1 


Chenopod 

Muellerolimon 

salicorniaceum 

0.3 


M1 

Shrub 


Tecticornia 

auriculata 

0.3 


M1 

Chenopod 



In  an  NVIS  description, ‘U’  denotes the  upper  storey,  ‘M’ the mid storey  and  ‘G’ the  under  storey  (ground  cover).  Numerals  to 

denote substrata from tallest (ESCAVI 2003). 



 

According  to  the  National  Vegetation  Information  System  (NVIS),  the  vegetation  community  may  be 

described as (ESCAVI 2003): 

M1+ ^Tecticornia halocnemoides, T. sp., Muellerolimon salicorniaceum\samphire shrub, shrub\1\i. 



 

Transect RCM029B-R2 

The second transect at Goats Bay was established approximately 20 m from the water’s edge (Figure 7). 

The  substrate  was  waterlogged  at  the  time  of  survey.  Vegetation  at  this  site  was  very  sparse  and 

dominated by Avicennia marina mid-high sparse shrubs (2.8% cover, 1.5 m tall) over low isolated clumps 

of Tecticornia halocnemoides and T. auriculata (2.4% cover, <0.4 m tall). No further taxa were recorded 

along the transect (Table 5). 

As with the mangroves at Jacks Vent, most large individuals around the area (some up to 4 m tall) had 

been killed by the flooding event in the year 2000. Despite this impact, the overall community condition 

was considered ‘natural’ (Table 9). 

 

Figure 7 – Goats Bay vegetation transect RCM029B-R2. 



 

Table  5  –  Plant  taxa  recorded  along  Goats  Bay  vegetation  transect  RCM029B-R2  (in  order  of 

stratum then dominance). 

Genus 

Species 

Height (m) 

Stratum

1

 

Form 

Avicennia 

Marina 

1.5 


U1 

Shrub 


Tecticornia 

Halocnemoides 

0.4 


M1 

Chenopod 



Tecticornia 

auriculata 

0.3 


M1 

Chenopod 



In  an  NVIS  description, ‘U’  denotes the  upper  storey,  ‘M’ the mid storey  and  ‘G’ the  under  storey  (ground  cover).  Numerals  to 

denote substrata from tallest (ESCAVI 2003). 

According  to  the  National  Vegetation  Information  System  (NVIS),  the  vegetation  community  may  be 

described as (ESCAVI 2003): 

NVIS 

U1+  ^Avicennia  marina\shrub  (mangrove)\3\r;  M1  ^Tecticornia  halocnemoides,  T. auriculata\samphire 



shrub\1\bc. 

 

3.4.  Aquatic Invertebrates 

Several  locations  in  the  Lake  MacLeod  System  were  surveyed  for  aquatic  invertebrates  during  the 

Carnarvon  Basin  Survey  (Halse  et  al.2000).  Site  CBS076  is  located  within  a  few  hundred  metres  of 

RCM029B in the same embayment. CBS079 (“Blue Holes”), if not Jack’s Vent, is certainly very close to it 

and  is  the  same  type  of  habitat.  Samples  were  also  collected  from  two  other  locations  (CBS077  and 

CBS078) in the lake by Halse et al. (2000). For both of the IAI RCM survey locations, macroinvertebrate 

family and species richness (Table 6 and 7) are similar to those recorded by Halse et al. (2000). 

Specimens collected during the Carnarvon Basin Survey were not available to compare with specimens 

collected during the IAI RCM project. This means that some species of invertebrates listed below may be 

duplicates,  particularly  for  molluscs.  This  may  explain  the  inconsistency  in  mollusc  species  between 

projects. This uncertainty notwithstanding, forty-four taxa have been recorded from these locations. The 

fauna  is  dominated  by  crustaceans  and  polychaetes  and  is  largely  marine  in  taxonomic  affinity.  Thus, 

many species belong to marine families and genera, and some are probably marine species, particularly 

the crustaceans, molluscs and polychaetes. Neocyclops petovskii is the only species of the Neocyclops 

genus known from Australian inland waters and the Lake MacLeod System is the type location (and only 

known  locality)  where  this  species  has  been  recorded.  Some  other  species  in  Table  6  are  known  from 

inland  salt  lakes  elsewhere,  including  the  rotifer  Keratella  australis,  copepod  Onychocamptus 

bengalensis  and  chironomid  Kiefferulus  longilobus  (though  the  latter  two  tend  to  inhabit  near  coastal 

lakes). Kiefferulus longilobus is a relatively uncommon species. 

 

Table 6 – Summary of the findings of surveys of aquatic invertebrate richness conducted at Lake 

MacLeod  by  the  Carnarvon  Basin  Survey  and  Inland  Aquatic  Integrity  Resource  Condition 

monitoring project.  

Diversity measure 

Carnarvon Basin Survey 

RCM Survey 

Carnarvon Basin Survey 

RCM Survey 

Goat Bay 

Goat Bay 

Jacks Vent? 

Jacks Vent 

Aug 1994 

Mar 1995 

Oct 2008 

Oct 1994 

Mar 1995 

Oct 2008 

Total invertebrate 

species richness 

14 

16 


 

17 


21 

 

Macroinvertebrate 



species richness 



11 


10 

18 


Total invertebrate 

family richness 

12 

16 


 

17 


19 

 

Macroinvertebrate 



family richness 



11 

11 


 

17 


 

 

Table 7 –  Aquatic invertebrates recorded during the Carnarvon Basin Surveys (CBS) and Inland  Aquatic Integrity Resource  Condition 

Monitoring project survey (RCM) at Lake MacLeod. 

Class 

Order 

Family 

Lowest ID 

CBS076 

CBS076 

CBS079 

CBS079 

RCM029A  RCM029B 

Aug 1994  Mar 1995  Oct 1994  Mar 1995 

Oct 2008 

Oct 2008 

Nematoda 

  

  

Nematoda 



  



  

  



Rotifera 

Ploimida 

Brachionidae 

Keratella australis 

  

  



  

  



  

Gastropoda  Neotaeniglossa 

Bithynidae 

Gabbia sp. B (CB) 

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



Truncattidae 

Truncatella cf. guerinii (CB) 

  

  



  

  



  

  

  



Marginellidae 

Marginellidae 

  





  

  



  

Opisthobranchia  Scaphandridae 



Arcteocina sp. 



  



  

  

  



Diaphanidae 

Diaphanidae 

  





  

  

  



  

  

Ituminoeidae 



Liloa brevis 

  

  



  

  

1,2,3 



  

  



Gastropoda sp.1 

  

  

  



  

1,2,3 


  

  

 



 

Gastropoda sp.2 

  

  

  



  

1,2,3 


  

Bivalvia 

Veneroida 

Laternulidae 



Laternula cf. anatina (CB) 

  

  



  

  



  

  



Bivalvia 

  

  



  

  



Polychaeta 

Nereidae 



Nereidae 

  

  



+,2 


  

 2 


 

 

Capitellidae 



Capitellidae 

 

 



 

+,2,3 


1,2,3 

2,3 


  

 

Orbiniidae 



Orbiniidae 

  



  



1,2,3  

 

 



Syllidae 

Syllidae 

 

 

 



+,3 

 

 



 

 

Eunicidae 



Eunicidae 

 

 



 

 

1,3 



1,3 

  

 



Polynoidae 

Polynoidae 

  



  



  

2,3 



Arachnida 

Parasitiformes 

Mesostigmata 



  

  

  



  

1,2 


  

Crustacea 

Decapoda 



Decapoda sp. 

  

  



  

2,3 



  

Ostracoda 

Candonidae 

Phlyctenophora cf. zealandia (CB) 



  



  

  

 



Trachyleberididae 

Actinocythereis scutigera 



  

  

  



  

  

 



Paradoxostomidae  Paradoxostoma sp. 429 (CB) 

  



  

  



  

  

 



Pectocytheridae 

Mckenzieartia portjacksonensis (CB) 

  

  



  

  



  

Crustacea 

Copepoda 

Acartidae 



Acartia sp. 357 (CB) 



  

  



  

  

 



Cyclopidae 

Neocyclops petovskii 



  



  

  

 



Canthocamptidae 

Nannomesochra arupinensis 

  

  



  

  



  

 

Class 

Order 

Family 

Lowest ID 

CBS076 

CBS076 

CBS079 

CBS079 

RCM029A  RCM029B 

Aug 1994  Mar 1995  Oct 1994  Mar 1995 

Oct 2008 

Oct 2008 

  

 



Laophontidae 

Onychocamptus bengalensis 



  

  



  

  

 



Diosaccidae 

Robertsonia mourei 



  

  



  

  

 



 

Robertsonia propinqua 

  



  



  

  

 



 

Amphiascoides subdelis 

  



  

  

  



  

  

 



 

Amonardia sp. n. (CB) 

  

  



  

  



  

  

 



Ameiridae 

Ameira sp. 308 (CB) 

  

  



  



  

  

 



Lourinidae 

Lourinia armata 

  



  

  

  



  

  

 



Tisbidae 

Tisbella timsae 

  



  

  

  



  

  

 





Harpacticoida sp 415 (CB) 

  

  



  

  



  

  

Amphipoda 



Paracalliopiidae 

Paracalliopidae 





2,3 



  

 

Aoridae 



Grandidierella ?gilesi 

  

  



  

  

1,2,3 



1,2,3 

  

 



Paramelitidae 

Paramelitidae 

  



  

  



Insecta 

Coleoptera 

Hydrophilidae 

Enochrus elongatus 

  

  



  

  



  

  

 



 

Hydrophilidae 

  

  

 



  

  



  

Diptera 


Ceratopogonidae 

Ceratopogonidae 

  

  

  



  

  



  

 

Stratiomyidae 



Stratiomyidae 

  

  



  

1,3 



  

 



Ephydridae 

Ephydridae 

  

  

  



  

1,3 


  

 



Chironomidae 

Tanytarsus barbitarsis 

  

  



  

  



  

 



 

Kiefferulus longilobus 

  

  



  

  



  

  

Hemiptera 



Saldidae 

Pentacora sp. 

  

  



  

  



  

Shading indicates microinvertebrate species not identified for the RCM project. 

+ indicates presence in Carnarvon Basin Survey samples, numbers indicate presence in samples 1, 2 or 3 of the RCM sampling. 

The CB (Carnarvon Basin Survey) samples each consisted of a 50 m benthic sweep using a net with 250 µm mesh plus a 50 m plankton sample using a net with 50 µm mesh. 

The three RCM samples (samples 1, 2 and 3 in the RCM columns) were replicate 15 m benthic sweeps (bare sediment) using a net with 250 µm mesh. 

The aorid amphipod was identified by Jim Lowry at the Australian Museum, Sydney. 



 

3.5.  Waterbirds 

Waterbirds were not counted as part of the IAI RCM survey at Jacks Vent and Goat Bay. 



3.6.  Other Fauna 

Fish were observed at both Jacks Vent (Halse et al. 2000) and Goat Bay (Figure 8). The species of fish 

were not formally identified, but are believed to be Flag Tail Grunter (Amniataba caudovittata), Mangrove 

Jack (Lutjanus argentimaculatus) and a species of mullet (possibly Mugil cephalus). 

There was no evidence of other terrestrial vertebrate fauna within the wetland. 

 

Figure  8  –Fish  observed  at  Jacks  Vent  within  the  Lake  MacLeod  System.  The  image  on  the  left 



shows  the  species  thought  to  be  Mugil  cephalus  and  the  one  on  the  right  shows  the  species 

thought to be Flag Tail Grunter (Amniataba caudovittata). 

4. Threats to Ecology of the Lake MacLeod System 

An analysis of threats to the ecology of Lake MacLeod was completed in 2008. Disturbance from human 

visits was identified as the most significant threat to the system, followed by introduced fish, predation of 

waterbirds by carnivores, livestock and feral animal grazing, increased turbidity and extraction of salt and 

gypsum. A number of more minor threats were also discussed. 

Based on the findings of the IAI RCM project, the threat analysis overstates the threat posed by human 

visitation of the northern vents. It seems unlikely that significant numbers of visitors will travel the difficult 

access road because the lake has very limited recreational appeal in comparison to the nearby coastline. 

It  is  possible  that  the  threat  posed  by  the  introduced  fish  tilapia  (Oreochromis  mossambica)  has  also 

been exaggerated. Although its absence from the lake cannot be confirmed, it has never been credibly 

recorded  there  and  was  not  observed  during  two  visits  be  the  IAI  RCM  project.  Tilapia  are  known  to 

occur in the Gascoyne catchment and there is an ongoing risk they may become established in the lake. 

The  result  of  prioritising  the  threats  posed  by  human  visitors  and  feral  fish  is  that  the  threat  posed  by 

mining has been deemphasised. The southern end of Lake MacLeod has been used by Dampier Salt Ltd 

for commercial salt production since 1978. In 1997, Dampier Salt also began mining gypsum adjacent to 

the  salt  mine,  although  the  gypsum  operation  is  currently  suspended.  To  date,  salt  production  has 

involved  pumping  groundwater  onto  the  lake  surface,  allowing  it  to  evaporate  and  then  collecting  the 

crystallised  salt.  This  carries  a minor  risk  of  disturbing  the  hydrology  of  the  system.  However,  Dampier 

salt  is  currently  considering  increasing  production  by  mining  the  profile  beneath  the  lake  bed  (Chris 

McQuade  pers.  comm.).  Doing  so  will  require  dewatering  the  profile,  with  potentially  far  more  serious 

consequences than current water extraction. 


 

Pastoral leases surround Lake MacLeod (Jaensch 1992). Goats and sheep were seen in the paddocks 

adjacent  to  both  Jacks  Vent  and  Goat  Bay.  However,  little  evidence  of  grazing  was  observed  and  the 

impact of livestock and feral goats on the wetland appeared minimal. 

Mangrove  deaths  near  the  water’s  edge  were  evident  at  both  Jacks  Vent  and  Goats  Bay.  These  were 

caused by a flooding event in February/March 2000 (D. Bauer pers. comm.). Flooding events are part of 

the natural ecology of the wetland and regeneration appears to be occurring. 

Numerous tyre tracks were observed  at Jacks Vent.  If unmanaged,  vehicle access has the  potential to 

caused  significant  impacts  such  as  erosion,  introduction  of  weeds,  and  vegetation  damage,  as  well 

creating permanent tracks that could facilitate greater visitation to the site. 

More  information  on  threats  to  Lake  MacLeod  is  available  in  the  Lake  MacLeod  Ecological  Character 

Description and Lake MacLeod Management Plan. Both of these documents are currently in draft. 



 

References 

 

Bureau  of  Meteorology  (2009)  Climate  Statistics  for  Australian  Locations.  Bureau  of  Meteorology. 





Yüklə 2,51 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə