Responses of twelve tree species common in everglades tree islands to simulated hydrologic regimes



Yüklə 395,24 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix08.08.2017
ölçüsü395,24 Kb.
  1   2   3

RESPONSES OF TWELVE TREE SPECIES COMMON IN EVERGLADES TREE

ISLANDS TO SIMULATED HYDROLOGIC REGIMES

David T. Jones

1

, Jay P. Sah



1

, Michael S. Ross

1

, Steven F. Oberbauer



2

, Bernice Hwang

1

,

and Krish Jayachandran



1,3

1

Southeast Environmental Research Center



2

Department of Biological Sciences

3

Department of Environmental Studies



Florida International University

Miami, Florida, USA 33199

Abstract:

Twelve tree species common in Everglades tree islands were subjected to three hydrologic

regimes under controlled conditions for 25 weeks and assessed for growth and physiological responses.

Treatments representing high, low, and no flood were maintained in pools of water to mimic seasonal

variation in water depths at different positions in tree islands. Soil inundation under the high flood

treatment resulted in reduced tree growth (height, basal diameter, crown volume) that was more

pronounced and occurred earlier in mesic forest species than in swamp forest species. Physiological

responses differed less among species, although stomatal conductance was a better predictor of the effects

of flood stress on growth than either relative water content or chlorophyll fluorescence (F

v

/F



m

). Some


swamp species appeared to be better adapted to rising water levels than others; Annona glabra, Morella

cerifera, and Salix caroliniana responded more positively to flooding, while Magnolia virginiana, Persea

borbonia, Chrysobalanus icaco, and Ilex cassine were less flood-tolerant. The highest mortalities and

lowest growth were observed in the five upland species: Bursera simaruba, Coccoloba diversifolia, Eugenia

axillaris, Sideroxylon foetidissimum, and Simarouba glauca. Of these, Sideroxylon and Simarouba did not

survive to the end of the study under the high flood treatment. The moist soil conditions simulated by the

low flood treatment resulted in greater growth in all species compared to soil inundation under high

flood, except for the most flood-tolerant (Annona, Morella, Salix). The arrangement of species according

to their responses to experimental flooding roughly paralleled their spatial distribution in the tree islands.

The gradient in species responses demonstrated in this experiment may help guide responsible water

management and tree island restoration in the Everglades.

Key Words: flood tolerance, tree island, Florida Everglades, hydrologic regime, restoration

INTRODUCTION

Tree islands are among the most distinctive

features of the Florida Everglades (USA) and have

been described by various workers over the past

90 years (Harshberger 1914, Harper 1927, Davis

1943, Loveless 1959, Craighead 1971, Sklar and van

der Valk 2002a). They generally occur on elevated

limestone outcrops or above bedrock depressions

embedded within a freshwater or brackish marsh or

swamp. Because surface elevation at the center of

the tree island is typically higher than the surround-

ing marsh, a vegetation gradient can usually be

identified, with tropical and subtropical hardwood

species inhabiting the better-drained interior posi-

tions and swamp species of mainly temperate origin

dominating the frequently flooded edge locations.

Tree islands cover less than five percent of the

Everglades, yet they perform many vital ecosystem

functions, including nutrient cycling and provision

of wildlife habitat, and have historical and cultural

significance as sites of human habitation (van der

Valk and Sklar 2002).

Tree island vegetation is one of the most sensitive

components of the Everglades landscape to changes

in regional hydrology, where extremes in marsh

water levels can have serious consequences (Loveless

1959, Craighead 1971, 1984, McPherson 1973,

Alexander and Crook 1984, Brandt et al. 2000,

Sklar and van der Valk 2002a). Prolonged periods of

high water may adversely affect the condition of tree

island vegetation via death or dieback in flood-

intolerant species. Similarly, persistent low water

may create conditions of extreme fire risk, during

which vegetation may be catastrophically damaged.

Management-oriented changes in water-flow pattern

WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 3, September 2006, pp. 830–844

2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists



830

in the Everglades have resulted in such hydrologic

extremes, particularly in some of the Water Conser-

vation Areas (WCA) north of Everglades National

Park (ENP), where the number of tree islands has

decreased (Schortemeyer 1980) and the vegetation

on the existing islands has been altered (Wetzel

2002). Sklar and van der Valk (2002b) reported that

tree island number declined 87% in WCA 2A

between 1953 and 1995, and 61% in WCA 3

between 1940 and 1995.

The loss of tree islands and their associated

historical, cultural, and biological values has raised

awareness of the fragility of these habitats and

stimulated a resurgence of interest in their study and

preservation.

Maintaining

and/or

restoring



the

health of tree islands (and other Everglades habitats)

are components of the Comprehensive Everglades

Restoration Plan (CERP), a multi-agency project

designed to restore and enhance the freshwater

resources and natural environments of southern

Florida (USACE 1999). Consequently, there is

a need within CERP for tools to assess the health

of tree islands and to relate these measures to the

hydrologic regime to which they are exposed. Flood

tolerance and other ecophysiological characteristics

of tree island tree species are a critical element in the

formulation of these performance measures.

Flood tolerances of tree island tree species are not

well-documented in the literature. Guerra (1997)

and Jones et al. (1997) evaluated tree island

vegetation in the southern Everglades after a period

of prolonged high water in 1994–95 and noted its

effects on individual tree and shrub species. Conner

et al. (2002) reviewed flood tolerance in ten common

tree island species based on flood impact studies

conducted largely in bottomland forests in other

parts of the southern United States. In the only

reported greenhouse study, Gunderson et al. (1988)

examined the effects of a range of hydrologic

conditions, including flooding, on seedling growth

and morphology in five Everglades tree island

species. None of these studies attempted to assess

physiological responses of plants, and between the

latter two, only three subtropical hardwood forest

species were examined compared to nine swamp

forest species. In order to gain insight into species

responses in the field, a controlled study combining

morphological and physiological measurements on

a broad range of hydric and mesic tree island species

growing under different hydrologic regimes is

needed.

Studies in other ecosystems have successfully used



morphological (e.g., root and stem biomass, height,

stem diameter, leaf area, comparative anatomy) and

physiological parameters (e.g., chlorophyll fluores-

cence, leaf water potential, relative water content,

gas exchange, stomatal conductance) to elucidate

tree responses to water stress induced by flooding

and/or drought (Regehr et al. 1975, Pereira and

Kozlowski 1977, O

¨ gren and O

¨ quist 1985, Ewing

1996, Schmull and Thomas 2000, Anderson and

Pezeshki 2001, Davanso et al. 2002). Previous

studies have shown that flooding to or above the

soil surface may result in a range of adverse

responses, from diminished growth and photosyn-

thesis to death, in seedlings and saplings (Keeley

1979, Pezeshki and Chambers 1986, Ewing 1996,

Lopez and Kursar 1999, Schmull and Thomas 2000,

Davanso et al. 2002) and trees (Broadfoot and

Williston 1973, Harms et al. 1980, Vu and Yele-

nosky 1991, Ewing 1996, McKevlin et al. 1998).

The objectives of our study were twofold. First,

we compared tree height, basal stem diameter,

crown volume, plant condition, mortality, stomatal

conductance, chlorophyll fluorescence, and leaf

relative water content to assess growth, survival,

and physiological performance in several common

tree island tree species exposed to varying hydrologic

conditions under shadehouse conditions. Second, we

compared the relative flood tolerances of these

species grown in the shadehouse to their observed

distribution along the hydrologic gradient in tree

islands under natural conditions.

We hypothesized that increased soil flooding

would adversely affect the growth and physiological

performance of plant species adapted to tree islands.

We predicted that the adverse responses would be

more pronounced and occur earlier in the tropical

hardwood tree species compared to the swamp

species, and the greatest effects would be seen under

conditions of prolonged soil flooding compared to

little or no soil flooding. We also expected that

relative flood tolerances of the species tested in the

shadehouse would reflect their observed distribution

along the hydrologic gradient in tree islands of the

southern Everglades.

METHODS

Species Studied



The names and distributions of the 12 tree species

used in this study, all native to Florida, are listed in

Table 1. Plant species are referred hereafter by their

genus name. Seven swamp forest species were

selected, all temperate in origin, except Annona and

Chrysobalanus, which are largely tropical. In south-

ern Florida, these species prefer wet habitats and are

common elements of the seasonally flooded portions

of tree islands. The remaining five upland forest

Jones et al., TREE RESPONSES TO HYDROLOGIC REGIMES

831


species are broadly distributed in the American

tropics, with southern Florida at the northern limit

of their ranges. Within the Everglades, they can be

found in the most elevated portions of the tree

islands, commonly referred to as hardwood ham-

mocks, as well as in other mesic forest sites. All 12

species are evergreen, with the exception of Salix

(deciduous) and Annona and Bursera (semi-decidu-

ous) (Tomlinson 1980).

Plant Acquisition and Experimental Design

During May and June of 2001, a minimum of 100

seedlings of each species was collected from tree

islands in Shark Slough, ENP. Seedlings were

transferred to small peat pots containing commercial

organic potting soil and placed in a glasshouse.

Eight weeks later, the plants were transferred to

26.5-L plastic pots (one plant per pot) containing

garden soil (pH 6.4) and placed in a shadehouse that

provided 50% full sun. After eight months of

growth, the plants were transferred to inflatable

swimming pools placed in the shadehouse in

preparation

for

the


flooding

experiment.

The

experimental



design

was


randomized

complete


block, with 12 species and 3 treatment combinations

represented twice in each of four blocks. Plants were

stratified among the three treatments according to

height and randomly placed within blocks.

The three treatments – high flood (HF), low flood

(LF), no flood (NF) – simulated the range of

hydrologic conditions found on tree islands in

Shark


Slough

as

determined



by

topographic

surveys. The bottoms of pots under HF and LF

were positioned at 0, 27.1, and 57 cm, respectively,

above the pool bottom. HF and LF represented

realistic hydrologic regimes found at the lower

and higher ends, respectively, of the tree island

swamp forest environmental gradient, while NF

represented hydrologic conditions found in the

relatively higher tropical hardwood forest portion

of a tree island.

Water levels, equal in all pools, were managed to

simulate variation in mean weekly water depths in

Shark Slough derived from hydrologic data re-

corded at U.S. Geological Survey ground-water

Table 1.


List of species and their distributions. Species are grouped by their habitat preference in southern Florida.

Species (Common Name)

1

Family


Distribution

2,3


Swamp Forest Species

Annona glabra L. (Pond Apple)

Annonaceae

southern Florida, West Indies, Mexico to

South America, West Africa

Chrysobalanus icaco L. (Coco Plum)

Chrysobalanaceae

southern Florida, West Indies, Mexico to

South America, West Africa

Ilex cassine L. (Dahoon)

Aquifoliaceae

Virginia to southern Florida, Cuba,

Bahama Islands

Magnolia virginiana L. (Sweetbay)

Magnoliaceae

eastern U.S. from Massachusetts to

southern Florida

Morella cerifera (L.) Small (Wax Myrtle)

Myricaceae

Bermuda, Greater Antilles, Central

America, eastern U.S. from New

Jersey to southern Florida

Persea borbonia L. (Red Bay)

Lauraceae

Gulf and Atlantic States of U.S.

Salix caroliniana Michx.

(Carolina Willow)

Salicaceae

southeastern U.S. from Virginia to southern

Florida, Cuba

Upland Forest Species

Bursera simaruba (L.) Sarg.

(Gumbo-Limbo)

Burseraceae

southern Florida, West Indies, Mexico to

northern South America

Coccoloba diversifolia Jacq. (Pigeon Plum)

Polygonaceae

southern Florida, West Indies

Eugenia axillaris (Sw.) Willd.

(White Stopper)

Myrtaceae

southern Florida, Bermuda, West Indies,

Central America

Sideroxylon foetidissimum Jacq. (Mastic)

Sapotaceae

southern Florida, West Indies, Mexico,

Belize


Simarouba glauca DC. (Paradise Tree)

Simaroubaceae

southern Florida, West Indies, Central

America


1

Wunderlin (1998),

2

Little (1978),



3

Tomlinson (1980).

832

WETLANDS, Volume 26, No. 3, 2006



hydrostation G620 (ENP) for the period 1990–1999.

At the start of the experiment (April 2002), co-

inciding with the beginning of the growing season in

southern Florida, pools were filled with piped water

(pH 7.7) to a depth of 9.4 cm. Every seven days

thereafter, water levels were adjusted by adding or

removing water according to the appropriate weekly

water depth. Following this schedule, under HF,

water levels exceeded the bottoms of pots on day 1

and reached the soil surface at week 10. Under LF,

the bottoms of pots first encountered the rising

water at week 10 and the soil surface would have

been inundated at week 28 had the experiment not

been terminated prematurely (see below). Because

pots would not be subjected to any flooding under

NF, they were randomly placed in a single ring

along the outer circumference of their assigned

pools. Under NF, plants required regular watering,

while all others were watered by hand whenever the

soil surface appeared dry, especially in the earlier

weeks of the experiment when water levels were still

low. For logistical reasons associated with rapid

growth in several species 3 treatment combinations

(e.g., competition among individuals for light, out-

growing

the


shadehouse), the

experiment

was

terminated after 25 weeks of treatment.



Mortality and Overall Plant Condition

Plant condition was determined by subjectively

assessing the overall health and vigor of each

individual tree and assigning a numerical score from

0 to 5. Visual observations on the conditions of

stems and foliage (e.g., coloration, growth) and the

occurrence of pests and disease (e.g., gall formation

and other insect damage) were used to make each

assessment. Individuals that displayed mostly green

foliage, leafy stems, active stem growth, and a lack

of pests and diseases were perceived as being healthy

and vigorous and assigned a value of 5. Individuals

that displayed yellowing leaves, premature leaf fall,

little or no stem growth, and/or insect or disease

damage were assigned a value of 1 to 4, depending

on the extent of the observed condition or condi-

tions. Dead individuals were assigned a value of 0.

Plant condition was the only measurement used in

this study in which all individuals were assessed

weekly. Mean condition of surviving individuals was

calculated weekly for each species and treatment,

and mortality was tracked on the same interval.

Plants that appeared dead were kept in their pools

and observed for several more weeks; dead trees

were removed from blocks.

Growth Measurements

Height, basal diameter, and crown volume of all

individuals were measured during the week prior to

treatment (week 0), then at 6, 12, 18, and 24 weeks

after initiation of the experiment. Height from the

top of the soil in each pot to the highest point (leaf,

stem, or meristem) of the tree was recorded to the

nearest cm. Basal diameter was measured using

a plastic dial caliper to the nearest tenth of

a millimeter. The diameter of single-stemmed trees

was


measured

at

a



position

along


the

stem


approximately 2 cm above the soil surface; red paint

was applied to the stem at this position to ensure

consistency when measuring. For individual trees

that produced multiple stems arising at or near soil

level, as in Morella and Salix, the most vigorous

stem


was

identified;

this

stem


was

measured


throughout the study. Crown volume was estimated

by modeling the tree crown as a series of conic

frustums of 10 cm height and terminal cones of

smaller height (Figure 1). Crown volumes of indi-

viduals with crown depths of at least 30 cm were

measured by taking crown-width measurements at

Figure 1.

Tree crown volume diagrams and equations for calculating volumes of (a) conic frustums (used for crown

depths greater to or equal to 30 cm) and (b) conic frustums and cones (used for crown depths less than 30 com).

V5volume, R5radius at the widest base, S5corresponding perpendicular radius, r5radius at the other base,

s5corresponding perpendicular radius, H5height of frustum and cone, h5height of cone.

Jones et al., TREE RESPONSES TO HYDROLOGIC REGIMES

833


intervals of 10 cm along the stem and totaling the

volume of each conic frustum (Figure 1a); volumes

of conic frustums were then summed to estimate

total crown volume. For individuals with crown

depths of less than 30 cm, lengths of the basal and

widest portions of the crowns, their perpendicular

widths, and their distance to crown tops were

measured (Figure 1b). Volumes of the conic frustum

and cone were then summed to estimate total crown

volume.


Physiological Measurements

Stomatal conductance, chlorophyll fluorescence,

and leaf relative water content were measured, at

weeks 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24. Four individuals from

each species-treatment combination (one from each

block) were selected for the measurements. Mea-

surements were conducted in the shadehouse on

young, fully expanded, intact, sun leaves. A different

leaf on the same tree was selected each sampling

week. We attempted to standardize measurements

by taking data under sunny, dry conditions between

the hours of 0900 and 1500, whenever possible.

A LI-1600 steady state porometer (LI-COR

Biosciences, Lincoln, NE, USA) was used to

measure conductance to water vapor. Attached

leaves were inserted in the porometer and conduc-

tance was measured after 60 s.

Fluorescence yield, expressed in terms of the ratio

of variable fluorescence to maximal fluorescence

(F

v



/F

m

), was measured using an OS1-FL pulse



modulated chlorophyll fluorometer (Opti-Sciences,

Inc., Tyngsboro, MA, USA). Leaves were dark-

adapted for 10 min before measurement.

To determine relative water content, two 6-mm-

diameter discs were punched from a leaf and

immediately weighed to obtain fresh weight (fw).

Discs

were then



wrapped

in saturated

paper

toweling and kept in small, sealed petri dishes in



the lab at room temperature for 16–20 h and

reweighed after blotting dry to obtain saturated

weight (sw). Discs were then placed in an oven at 60

uC for 24 h and reweighed to obtain the dry weight

(dw). Relative water content was calculated using

the formula of J. C

ˇ atsky´ (in Slavı´k 1974):

Relative water content %

ð Þ ~

fw

À dw



ð

Þ= sw À dw

ð

Þ | 100:


.Statistical Analyses

A split-plot design approach was used to analyze

the main effects of species, hydrologic treatment, and

time. In standard repeated measures ANOVA, which

resembles multivariate analysis of variance (MAN-

OVA), a single missing value causes the entire subject

to be omitted from analysis in a listwise deletion

procedure. When missing values are common, split-

plot ANOVA is an effective alternative approach to

analyze repeated measures data (Maceina et al.

1994). In our study, missing values resulted primarily

from the mortality of individual plants. In addition,

on rare occasions, physiological data could not be

collected because of equipment malfunction, or in

the aftermath of leaf shedding events or herbivore

outbreaks that affected few species.

In preliminary analyses, the effect of Block (the


Yüklə 395,24 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə