Responses of twelve tree species common in everglades tree islands to simulated hydrologic regimes



Yüklə 395,24 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/3
tarix08.08.2017
ölçüsü395,24 Kb.
1   2   3

four pools) on all six parameters was found to be

non-significant; replicates for each species-treatment

combination were therefore pooled together for

subsequent analyses. The measurements of stomatal

conductance for all species during week 6 were

eliminated from the analysis of variance due to

a malfunction of the porometer. For all dependent

variables, when ‘F’ tests for main effects in the split-

plot ANOVA were found to be significant, multiple

comparison tests among treatments were conducted

for each species-week combination using the Fisher’s

least significant difference (LSD).

Trends in plant growth and physiology were

examined in more detail in four taxa that represent-

ed groups of species with similar response to the

three treatments. To define these groupings, we used

agglomerative cluster analysis (Goodall 1973), with

Euclidean distance used as a dissimilarity measure

and Ward’s linkage method of calculating relation

among species. The analysis was performed on six

composite variables obtained by applying Principal

Component

Analysis


(PCA)

to

response



data

collected throughout the experiment. Data included

periodic mean values for each species for the three

morphological

variables,

stomatal


conductance,

chlorophyll fluorescence, and overall plant condi-

tion, as well as week of occurrence of first mortality

in the collection of all seedlings from a given

treatment. Responses to the HF and LF treatments

were standardized by dividing periodic mean values

for each species by their values under the NF

treatment.

For each of the four representative species,

coefficients of response curves generated by in-

dividual plants were analyzed to test whether

treatments differed in structural and physiological

responses to flooding treatments over time (Mer-

edith and Stehman 1991, Carlton and Bazzaz 1998).

For each individual, linear, quadratic, and cubic

coefficients of response curves were obtained by

calculating weighted sums of the repeated measure-

ments for structural and physiological variables

using the relevant contrast coefficients as the weights

834


WETLANDS, Volume 26, No. 3, 2006

(Gurevitch and Chester 1986). Contrast coefficients

for morphological variables measured at regular

intervals were obtained from Keppel (1973: Table C-

2). For physiological variables, which were mea-

sured at unequal intervals, linear and quadratic

coefficients were calculated using methods described

in Keppel (1973). Unequal intervals due to the

removal


of

outliers


and

missing


values

(e.g.,


stomatal conductance measurements at week 6)

were handled in the same way. Treatment effects

on the response curve coefficients were then assessed

by one-way ANOVA. Results were considered

statistically different at the p , 0.05 level. Prior to

using ANOVA, assumptions of normality and

homogeneity of variance were tested by the Kolmo-

grov-Smirnov and Levene’s tests, respectively. Ex-

cept where noted, these assumptions were satisfied.

RESULTS


Flooding treatment had significant (p , 0.001)

effects on height, basal diameter, and crown volume

of the twelve plant species considered over the

25 week study period (Table 2). In eight of 12

species, mean height, basal diameter, and crown

volume were greater in LF than in HF and NF

treatments. All second- and third-order interactions

were significant for the three morphological vari-

ables and for chlorophyll fluorescence and stomatal

conductance. However, only first order effects were

significant for relative water content. Because the

preponderance of interaction effects indicated that

species were reacting to flooding treatment differ-

ently over time, their responses were analyzed

separately.

The cluster analysis produced four groups of

species at the 50% information remaining level

(Figure 2): two groups of swamp forest species,

one group of upland forest species, and an in-

termediate group combining both swamp and

upland species. The swamp species group of Annona

and Salix (Swamp Group 1) was linked to a second,

larger swamp group comprising Morella, Chrysoba-

lanus, Magnolia, and Ilex (Swamp Group 2). Four

upland species, Coccoloba, Bursera, Simarouba, and

Sideroxylon, formed a single group (Upland Group).

The fifth upland species, Eugenia, combined with the

swamp species Persea in a grouping (Intermediate

Group) that was most closely aligned with the

Upland Group. The results that follow are presented

in terms of these groups.

Tree Mortality

Under HF, all four species of the Upland Group

and Eugenia of the Intermediate Group showed

mortalities between 50 and 100%, while Magnolia

and Ilex of Swamp Group 2 and Persea of the

Intermediate Group showed mortalities between 25

and 40% (Table 3). Seven of these species first

showed losses of individuals between weeks 13 and

16 (only Sideroxylon showed some mortality at week

13) under this treatment. Mortality was not ob-

served in Eugenia until week 19, the latest for any

Table 2.

F-statistics from split-plot ANOVA for repeated measures data testing morphological and physiological

responses to three hydrologic treatments in twelve species. Number of repeated measures (t) 5 5 and number of replicates

per species 3 treatment combination (n) 5 8 for height (HT), basal diameter (BD), and crown volume (CV); t 5 5 & n 5 4

for chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) and relative water content (RWC); and t 5 4 and n 5 4 for stomatal conductance (SC). *

p,0.05; ** p,0.01, *** p,0.001. Degrees of freedom (df) are given in parentheses.

Source

HT

BD



CV

SC

CF



RWC

Species


79.7***

177.9***


50.7***

14.7***


12.0***

10.7***


(11,256)

(11,256)


(11,260)

(11,135)


(11,119)

(11,120)


Treatment

19.9***


13.1***

30.1***


5.8**

59.7***


3.8*

(2,258)


(2,257)

(2,265)


(2,149)

(2,126)


(2,122)

Species*Treatment

2.5***

2.9***


3.3***

2.8***


5.2***

0.3


(22,255)

(22,255)


(22,259)

(22,125)


(22,117)

(22,118)


PlantID (Species*Treatment)

5.8***


5.8***

2.5***


1.4*

0.9


1.0

(252,948)

(252,948)

(252,948)

(107,261)

(108,395)

(108,364)

Time


966.8***

818.6***


297.1***

20.7***


28.4***

35.3***


(4,948)

(4,948)


(4,948)

(3,261)


(4,395)

(4,364)


Species*Time

21.3***


50.7***

21.1***


4.7***

2.8***


1.1

(44,948)


(44,948)

(44,948)


(33,261)

(44,395)


(44,364)

Treatment*Time

35.0***

22.1***


30.8***

9.3***


8.7***

0.7


(8,948)

(8,948)


(8,948)

(6,261)


(8,395)

(8,364)


Species*Treatment*Time

3.2***


5.6***

3.4***


1.9***

1.9***


1.0

(85,948)


(85,948)

(85,948)


(63,261)

(85,395)


(85,364)

Jones et al., TREE RESPONSES TO HYDROLOGIC REGIMES

835


species. Only Simarouba, Sideroxylon, and Bursera

of the Upland Group showed some mortality under

LF (Table 3); these species had the highest mortality

under HF as well. Under LF, Simarouba and

Bursera showed their earliest mortalities at weeks

15 and 17, respectively, values comparable to the

first mortalities seen in the majority of species under

HF. The single mortality seen in Sideroxylon

occurred at week 24. Four species, Annona and

Salix (Swamp Group 1) and Morella and Chryso-

balanus (Swamp Group 2), did not experience any

mortality under HF and LF. No mortality occurred

in any species under NF.

Overall Plant Condition

Under HF, mean overall condition increased in

most species within the first eight weeks, followed by

a period of no change, then a decline (Figure 3).

Compared to the Upland and Intermediate Groups,

both Swamp Groups were generally less adversely

affected in terms of the onset and rate of this decline.

Small declines in overall condition were observed as

late as weeks 22 and 18 in Annona and Salix,

respectively. Greater declines were seen in Morella,

Chrysobalanus, and Magnolia of Swamp Group 2

and Eugenia and Persea of the Intermediate Group,

commencing at weeks 19, 14, 12, 13, and 11,

respectively. All four species of the Upland Group

and Ilex of Swamp Group 2 experienced the largest

declines. The onset of declining condition in these

species occurred at weeks 9–10, when water levels

first inundated the soil surface in pots. Yellowing of

leaves (widespread in Magnolia), premature leaf fall

(notable in Ilex and Simarouba), and insect herbiv-

ory (various species, most notably Coccoloba,

Persea, and

Salix)


were the

prevalent health

Figure 2.

Dendogram produced from agglomerative cluster analysis by applying PCA to plant response data.

Table 3.

Tree mortality after 25 weeks of experimental

treatments. Values are percentage of dead individuals.

Numbers in parentheses are week of earliest mortality

observed. Species are arranged from highest to lowest

mortality under HF. Annona, Chrysobalanus, Morella, and

Salix did not experience a single mortality. Treatment:

HF, high flood; LF, low flood; NF, no flood.

Species

Treatment



HF

LF

NF



Simarouba

100 (15)


25 (15)

Sideroxylon

100 (13)

13 (24)


Bursera

75 (15)


50 (17)

Coccoloba

50 (14)

Eugenia


50 (19)

Magnolia


38 (16)

Ilex


25 (16)

Persea


25 (16)

836


WETLANDS, Volume 26, No. 3, 2006

problems affecting overall condition under this

treatment.

Under LF, seven species experienced a decline in

mean overall condition over time (Figure 3). Com-

pared to HF, the onset of these declines occurred

earlier in Magnolia, at the same time in Annona and

Bursera, and later in Coccoloba, Eugenia, Side-

roxylon, and Simarouba. Among the remaining

species, all of which were from the two swamp

groups (except Persea of the Intermediate Group),

mean overall condition under LF either increased or

did not change over time. Insect herbivory was the

most commonly observed health problem affecting

overall condition under this treatment.

Growth Responses

Crown volume, tree height, and basal diameter

responses were similar; therefore, only the first is

presented here (Figure 4). Crown volumes in Annona

(Figure 4a) and Salix of Swamp Group 1 increased

throughout the study under all three treatments. In

Annona, the treatments elicited significantly different

linear (F

2,21

5

9.77, p 5 0.001) and quadratic (F



2,21

5

4.40, p 5 0.025) growth trends (Table 4). In this



species, crown volumes did not differ among the

three treatments through the first 12 weeks, but there

was an acceleration of growth under LF after week

12 (week 18 in Salix), resulting in a difference in

growth trends under LF and the other two treat-

ments (Table 4). At the end of the study, crown

volumes in Annona under HF and NF did not differ

significantly.

Chrysobalanus, representing Swamp Group 2, was

similar to Annona in its crown-volume response,

although linear growth trends under both LF and NF

were significantly (F

2,21

5

7.33, p 5 0.004; LSD



pairwise tests, p , 0.05) greater than under HF

(Figure 4b). Crown volume under LF and NF

continued to increase after week 12, when growth

under HF started to slow down, resulting as well in

a significantly different (F

2,21


5

8.04, p 5 0.003)

quadratic trend (Table 4). At the end of the study,

crown volume in Chrysobalanus under NF did not

differ significantly from HF or LF. Among the

remaining species in Swamp Group 2 (not shown),

Magnolia and Morella showed similar growth trends

to Chrysobalanus. Ilex differed, however, experienc-

ing a decline in crown volume under HF after week 12.

Crown volumes in Persea, representing the In-

termediate Group, increased throughout the study

under all three treatments, except for a decline under

HF after week 18 (Figure 4c). Differences in linear

and quadratic trends among treatments were highly

significant in this species (Table 4). The growth

trend was similar (roughly linear) under LF and NF,

with slight acceleration starting at weeks 12 and 6,

respectively. Under HF, the growth trend was

quadratic (U-shaped) due to an increase in crown

volume through week 18 followed by a decrease. As

in Swamp Group 2, crown volumes under LF and

NF in Persea (and Eugenia, also of the Intermediate

Group) did not differ throughout the study.

Representing the Upland Group, Bursera showed

an increase in crown volumes under LF and NF

throughout the study but experienced a decrease

under HF after week 6 (Figure 4d). In this species,

the linear growth trend differed significantly (F

2,11

5

6.76, p 5 0.012) among treatments (Table 4).



However, despite an apparent distinction in growth

trends among three treatments – an upward trend

under LF and NF and an inverted-U shaped trend

under HF (Figure 4d) – the quadratic terms did not

differ significantly (F

2,11


5

1.181, p 5 0.209) among

treatments

(Table 4),

in

part


because

of

low



statistical power due to mortality and loss of

replication (only three individuals of Bursera sur-

vived under both HF and LF). The remaining

species of this group (not shown) – Coccoloba,

Sideroxylon, Simarouba – showed similar responses.

Like Swamp Group 2 and the Intermediate Group,

crown volumes under LF and NF in the Upland

Group did not differ throughout the study.

Physiological Responses

Mean leaf relative water content showed little or

no change throughout the study. Because stomatal

conductance differed significantly among treatments

in most species (chlorophyll fluorescence differed in

fewer species), we chose to present only stomatal

conductance responses here (Figure 5). Most species

showed a decreasing trend in stomatal conductance

values under HF over time. However, the week

when conductance under HF was significantly

different from that under LF and NF differed in

the four groups of plants.

In Annona, representing Swamp Group 1, flood-

ing treatment did not have a significant (Repeated-

measures ANOVA: F

6,21


5

1.554, p 5 0.210) impact

on physiological performance. In this species, mean

stomatal conductance decreased under HF and NF

over the study period, while under LF, it peaked at

week 12 before declining (Figure 5a). Mean stoma-

tal conductance under LF at week 12 was signifi-

cantly higher than HF and NF. However, neither

the linear nor the quadratic trends differed signifi-

cantly among treatments (Table 4). Stomatal con-

ductance values under HF for Salix (not shown)

were the highest of all species after week 3.

Jones et al., TREE RESPONSES TO HYDROLOGIC REGIMES

837


In Chrysobalanus, representing Swamp Group 2,

physiological

responses

to

flooding



treatments

varied broadly over the study period, with the linear

trend in mean stomatal conductance differing

significantly among the treatments (Table 4). Mean

stomatal conductance was lowest under HF at week

18. In contrast, conductance was highest under LF

and NF during week 18 and decreased thereafter

(Figure 5b). Ilex and Magnolia (not shown) showed

similar responses, although the decline under HF

occurred earlier, at week 12, in the latter species.

Stomatal conductance under HF for Morella was

the highest of all species in Swamp Group 2 after

week 12 and was slightly greater than Salix of

Swamp Group 1 at week 24.

Persea (Figure 5c) and Eugenia of the Intermedi-

ate Group were most similar to Swamp Group 2,

with mean stomatal conductance under HF signif-

icantly lower than under LF and NF (Repeated-

measures ANOVA: F

6,27


5

3.815, p 5 0.007; LSD

pairwise test: p , 0.05). Trend analysis in Persea

indicated that only the linear term differed signifi-

cantly (F

2,9


5

6.42, p 5 0.019) among treatments

(Table 4). At week 3, mean stomatal conductance

did not differ among treatments; differences first

became evident at week 12, and were apparent at

weeks 18 and 24.

Bursera (Figure 5d) of the Upland Group showed

poor physiological performance, as indicated by the

lowest stomatal conductance values under HF of

any species during weeks 12 through 24. In this

species, stomatal conductance under NF decreased

from week 3 through week 24. At week 3, stomatal

conductance under LF was significantly lower than

under HF or NF (One-way ANOVA: F

2,9

5

15.4, p



5

0.001; LSD pairwise test: p, 0.003 and 0.001,

respectively) but peaked under this treatment during

week 12 before decreasing. By the end of the

experiment, there was no difference in stomatal

conductance among treatments. Except in the no-

flooding treatment, few Bursera individuals survived

to the end of the experiment, precluding trend

analysis. The responses of Sideroxylon, Coccoloba,

and Simarouba to the HF treatments (not shown)

Figure 3.

Mean weakly overall condition ratings under the high, low, and no flood treatments, for the 25 week

experimental period, arranged by species. Numerical ratings ranged from ‘0’ (representing a dead individual) to ‘5’ (a

healthy individual). The arrow indicates when water levels first inundated the soil surface in pots under the high flood

treatment at week 10.

838


WETLANDS, Volume 26, No. 3, 2006

were similar to Bursera (i.e., an early, precipitous

decline in stomatal conductance), but in these

species, both LF and NF decreased slowly or

remained stable throughout.

DISCUSSION

Of the eight parameters used in this study to

compare flooding responses, only relative water

content failed to differentiate flood-tolerant and

flood-intolerant species. We have found no previous

studies in which relative water content was used as

a measure of flood stress, although it has been used

to study the effects of drought in agricultural species

(Teulat et al. 1997, Liu and Stutzel 2002).

Fifteen weeks of soil surface flooding (HF

treatment) generally resulted in a reduction of

overall health, growth, and stomatal conductance

in the species studied, supporting our hypothesis

that flooding would diminish performance of upland

and swamp forest tree species growing in tree

islands. These declines were usually more precipi-

tous in the former group, in which adverse responses

in plants were observed as early as two weeks

preceding inundation of the soil surface. However,

even the swamp forest species showed reductions in

most of the study parameters under HF, generally

commencing after inundation of the soil surface. In

contrast, the greatest tree growth and physiological

activity


for

most


species

occurred


under

the


saturated soil conditions of the LF treatment,

a response similar to the large growth increases

observed in bottomland hardwood forest species in

the southern United States subjected to rising water

levels (Hosner and Boyce 1962, Broadfoot and

Williston 1973). Flooding can accelerate tree growth

under certain conditions, when timing and duration

are not injurious (Kozlowski 1982, Kozlowski and

Pallardy 2002).

By averaging the standardized means (i.e., HF/NF

ratio) for all growth and physiological variables and

overall plant condition at week 24 for each species,

we can rank the species tested in order of decreasing

flood tolerance as follows: Annona . Morella .

Salix . Chrysobalanus . Magnolia . Ilex . Persea

. Eugenia . Coccoloba . Bursera . Simarouba .

Sideroxylon. The presence of structural and meta-

bolic adaptations to anoxia may account for the

Figure 3.

Continued.

Jones et al., TREE RESPONSES TO HYDROLOGIC REGIMES

839


differential flood tolerances observed. Although

species were not examined for specific adaptations

in this study, adventitious roots, known to occur in

a large number of flood-tolerant species (Gill 1970,

Kozlowski et al. 1991, Armstrong et al. 1994,

Vartapetian and Jackson 1997), were observed only

in the seven swamp forest species under HF.

Aerenchyma tissue also develops in woody and

herbaceous wetland species (Smirnoff and Crawford


Yüklə 395,24 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə