Responses of twelve tree species common in everglades tree islands to simulated hydrologic regimes



Yüklə 395,24 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/3
tarix08.08.2017
ölçüsü395,24 Kb.
1   2   3

1983, Kozlowski et al. 1991, Vartapetian and

Jackson 1997), including Annona (Zotz et al. 1997)

and Salix (Jackson and Attwood 1996). Salix roots

and stems may also develop hypertrophied lenticels

(Pereira and Kozlowski 1977, Jackson and Attwood

1996) which further facilitate oxygen uptake and

transport in plants.

Structural adaptations can contribute to the

maintenance of stomatal conductance during flood-

ing and its recovery afterward (Kozlowski 1984,

Pezeshki and Chambers 1986, Sojka 1992, McKevlin

Figure 4.

Mean tree crown volumes (6 1 SE) under the high, low, and no flood treatments, at five sampling times, for

four representative species. ‘ High flood; e Low flood; n No flood.

Table 4.


Summary of ANOVA results showing linear and quadratic trends in treatment effects (df 5 2) on crown volume

and stomatal conductance in four species.

Species

Crown volume



Stomatal conductance

df (error)

Linear

Quadratic



df (error)

Linear


Quadratic

F

p



F

p

F



p

F

p



Annona

21

9.77



0.001

4.40


0.025

8

3.59



0.077

0.95


0.427

Bursera


11

6.76


0.012

1.81


0.209

3

2.01



0.280

9.83


0.048

Chrysobalanus

21

7.33


0.004

8.04


0.003

8

7.92



0.013

1.24


0.339

Persea


19

6.27


0.008

7.37


0.004

9

6.42



0.019

0.84


0.463

840


WETLANDS, Volume 26, No. 3, 2006

et al. 1998). This may explain the relatively higher

stomatal conductance values seen throughout the

study in some of the swamp forest species, most

notably Salix, Morella, and to some extent, Annona,

all of which formed extensive adventitious roots

under HF. The less extensive adventitious root

systems that developed in the remaining swamp

species under HF may have resulted in the relatively

lower stomatal conductance values observed in these

species. McKevlin et al. (1998) also reported di-

minished stomatal conductance in flood-tolerant

species growing in saturated soil. The early, pre-

cipitous declines in stomatal conductance shown by

the five upland forest tree species were expected,

although this contrasts with a study by Lopez and

Kursar (1999), who did not observe sharp reductions

in stomatal conductance in three upland tree species

in Panama during 90 days of inundation.

The lower survival and relatively poor growth and

physiological performance seen under HF in the

upland species tested is not surprising, given that

they are not found in regularly inundated sites.

These and many other important tropical species

occurring in upland sites of the region are adapted to

seasonally-dry conditions and commonly inhabit

thin soils that form directly on limestone (Craighead

1971, Tomlinson 1980, Armentano et al. 2002).

Consequently, they are potentially exposed to

seasonal drought, although in southern Florida,

some may be rooted in ground water. Whether the

ability to tolerate or avoid drought among upland

tree species is related to the ability to tolerate shoot

water stress induced by soil anoxia is not certain. In

a study of tropical dry forest trees, Brodribb et al.

(2003) found that Bursera simaruba, a species that

responds to drought in southern Florida by shed-

ding its leaves and avoiding drought, was especially

vulnerable to xylem cavitation (hence reduced water

conductivity). We found this species to be extremely

sensitive to flooding. Specific information on the

drought tolerance of the other upland species in our

study, however, is lacking. Our findings are in

Figure 5.

Mean stomatal conductance (6 1 SE) under the high, low, and no flood treatments, at four sampling times, for

four representative species. ‘ High flood; e Low flood; n No flood.

Jones et al., TREE RESPONSES TO HYDROLOGIC REGIMES

841


marked contrast to a similar study involving

seedlings of three upland tropical tree species

subjected to an experimental flooding regime. Lopez

and Kursar (1999) reported no mortality or visible

leaf damage after 90 days of inundation and

concluded that most tropical tree species are

relatively tolerant of flooding, yet do not become

established in inundated habitats.

The relative flood tolerances of the 12 test species

grown


under

simulated

flooding

regimes


for

25 weeks are roughly related to their observed

distribution along the natural hydrologic gradient

in tree islands of the southern Everglades. Other

studies on flood tolerance in bottomland forest tree

species of the United States have suggested a similar

relationship between flood tolerance and distribu-

tion patterns along flooding gradients (Hosner 1960,

Hosner and Boyce 1962, Dickson et al. 1965, Hook

and Brown 1973, Larson et al. 1981, McKnight et

al.1981, Mitsch and Rust 1984). In this study, flood

tolerance rankings of species under natural field

conditions were inferred by calculating mean water-

level optima for each species from vegetation surveys

in plots on three Shark Slough tree islands; using

a weighted averaging calibration and regression

procedure (Birks et al. 1990), the local hydrologic

regime was projected from long-term water-level

records. Species rankings under natural field condi-

tions differed little from those in the shadehouse

(e.g., Chrysobalanus was less flood-tolerant in the

tree island, Simarouba was more flood-sensitive in

the shadehouse). Age and size of plants, as well as

water quality, factors known to affect flood tolerance

in plants (Gill 1970, Kozlowski et al. 1991), may have

accounted for some of the discrepancies in the

rankings. The results of the few other studies of

flood tolerances in Everglades tree island tree species

(Gunderson et al. 1988, Guerra 1997) reveal similar

rankings of species as this study.

Extrapolated to the natural setting of a tree island,

the results of this study suggest that increasing water

depths and durations may have a beneficial yet

temporary effect on most hardwood hammock

species; prolonged soil surface inundation will hasten

reduction in tree growth and lead to death of these

species. The more flood-intolerant species of the

surrounding swamp forest (Persea, Magnolia, Ilex)

can be expected to respond similarly, although

a delay in the onset of reduced growth and perhaps

death would be expected. We terminated our study

before it was determined how the most flood-tolerant

swamp species (Annona, Salix, Morella) would

respond to increasingly higher and longer flood

waters. This knowledge can allow us to manage

species composition on tree islands with water level

and may allow early warning of flooding stress in tree

islands. With restoration plans under CERP antic-

ipating

modifications



in

hydrologic

conditions

throughout the Everglades, predicting responses of

tree island species to these changes becomes critical.

Knowledge of relative species tolerances, together

with ancillary information such as genotypic varia-

tion (McKevlin et al. 1998), particularly in species

distributed along a soil moisture gradient (Keeley

1979), will become important in selecting suitable

species to include in projects aimed at restoring

destroyed or degraded tree islands and creating new

ones, a CERP objective. For example, Wallace et al.

(1996) assessed flood tolerance and seedling growth

and survival under varying soil conditions and

developed guidelines for the use of nine tree species

in wetland restoration and creation in Florida.

Several of the species reported in our study have

never been evaluated for flood tolerance until now.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This project received funding through the U.S.

Department of the Interior’s Critical Ecosystem

Studies Initiative (CESI). The authors gratefully

acknowledge the assistance of the following Florida

International University staff for their valuable

contributions toward the successful completion of

this study: Josh Walters, Darcy Stockman, Debbie

Nolan, Pablo Ruiz, Hillary Cooley, and Dave Reed.

This is contribution # 331 of the Southeast

Environmental Research Center at Florida Interna-

tional University.

LITERATURE CITED

Alexander, T. R. and A. G. Crook. 1984. Recent vegetational

changes in South Florida. p. 199–210. In P. J. Gleason (ed.)

Environments of South Florida - Present and Past II, second

edition. Miami Geological Society, Coral Gables, FL, USA.

Anderson, P. H. and S. R. Pezeshki. 2001. Effects of flood pre-

conditioning on responses of three bottomland tree species to

waterlogging. Journal of Plant Physiology 158:227–233.

Armentano, T. V., D. T. Jones, M. S. Ross, and B. W. Gamble.

2002. Vegetation pattern and process in tree islands of the

southern Everglades and adjacent areas. p. 225–282. In F. H.

Sklar and A. van der Valk (eds.) Tree Islands of the Everglades.

Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands.

Armstrong, W., R. Bra

¨ ndel, and M. B. Jackson. 1994. Mechan-

isms of flood tolerance in plants. Acta Botanica Neerlandica

43:307–358.

Birks, H. J., J. M. Line, S. Juggins, A. C. Stevenson, and C. J. F.

ter Braak. 1990. Diatoms and pH reconstruction. Philosophical

Transactions of the Royal Society of London (Series B)

327:263–278.

Brandt, L. A., K. M. Portier, and W. M. Kitchens. 2000. Patterns

of change in tree islands in Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee

National Wildlife Refuge from 1950 to 1991. Wetlands 20:1–14.

Broadfoot, W. M. and H. L. Williston. 1973. Flooding effects on

southern forests. Journal of Forestry 71:584–587.

842


WETLANDS, Volume 26, No. 3, 2006

Brodribb, T. J., N. M. Holbrook, E. J. Edwards, and M. V.

Gutierrez. 2003. Relations between stomatal closure, leaf

turgor and xylem vulnerability in eight tropical dry forest

trees. Plant, Cell and Environment 26:443–450.

Carlton, G. C. and F. A. Bazzaz. 1998. Regeneration of three

sympatric birch species on experimental hurricane blowdown

microsites. Ecological Monographs 68:99–120.

Conner, W. H., T. W. Doyle, and D. Mason. 2002. Water depth

tolerances of dominant tree island species: what do we know?

p. 207–223. In F. H. Sklar and A. van der Valk (eds.) Tree

Islands of the Everglades. Kluwer Academic Publishers,

Dordrecht, The Netherlands.

Craighead, F. C. 1971. The Trees of South Florida, Volume I -

The Natural Environments and Their Succession. University of

Miami Press, Coral Gables, FL, USA.

Craighead, F. C. 1984. Hammocks of South Florida. p. 191–198.

In P. J. Gleason (ed.) Environments of South Florida - Present

and Past II, second edition. Miami Geological Society, Coral

Gables, FL, USA.

Davanso, V. M., L. A. de Souza, M. E. Medri, J. A. Pimenta, and

E. Bianchini. 2002. Photosynthesis, growth and development

of Tabebuia avellanedae Lor. ex Griseb. (Bignoniaceae) in

flooded soil. Brazilian Archives of Biology and Technology 45:

375–384.


Davis, J. H. 1943. The natural features of Southern Florida,

especially the vegetation, and the Everglades. Florida Geological

Survey, Tallahassee, FL, USA. Geological Bulletin No. 25.

Dickson, R. E., J. F. Hosner, and N. W. Hosley. 1965. The effects

of four water regimes upon the growth of four bottomland tree

species. Forest Science 11:299–305.

Ewing, K. 1996. Tolerance of four wetland plant species to

flooding and sediment deposition. Environmental and Exper-

imental Botany 36:131–146.

Gill, C. J. 1970. The flooding tolerance of woody species –

a review. Forestry Abstracts 31:671–688.

Goodall, D. W. 1973. Numerical classification. Handbook of

Vegetation Science 5:107–156.

Guerra, R. E. 1997. Impacts of the high water period of 1994–95

on tree islands in Water Conservation Areas. p. 47–58. In T.

Armentano (ed.) Ecological Assessment of the 1994–1995 High

Water Conditions in the Southern Everglades. South Florida

Management and Coordination Working Group, Miami, FL,

USA.

Gunderson, L. H., J. R. Stenberg, and A. K. Herndon. 1988.



Tolerance of five hardwood species to flooding regimes.

p. 119–132. In D. A. Wilcox (ed.) Interdisciplinary Approaches

to Freshwater Wetlands Research. Michigan State University

Press, East Lansing, MI, USA.

Gurevitch, J. and S. T. Chester. 1986. Analysis of repeated

measures experiments. Ecology 67:251–255.

Harms, W. R., H. T. Schreuder, D. D. Hook, C. L. Brown, and

F. W. Shropshire. 1980. The effects of flooding on the

swamp

forest


in

lake


Ocklawaha,

Florida.


Ecology

61:1412–1421.

Harper, R. M. 1927. Natural resources of southern Florida.

Eighteenth Annual Report. Florida State Geological Survey,

Tallahassee, FL, USA.

Harshberger, J. W. 1914. The vegetation of south Florida south of

27

u 379 north, exclusive of the Florida Keys. Transactions of the



Wagner Free Institute of Science of Philadelphia 7(3):51–189.

Hook, D. D. and C. L. Brown. 1973. Root adaptations and

relative flood tolerance of five hardwood species. Forest

Science 19:225–229.

Hosner, J. F. 1960. Relative tolerance to complete inundation of

fourteen bottomland tree species. Forest Science 6:246–251.

Hosner, J. F. and S. G. Boyce. 1962. Tolerance to water saturated

soil of various bottomland hardwoods. Forest Science 8:180–186.

Jackson, M. B. and P. A. Attwood. 1996. Roots of willow (Salix

viminalis L.) show marked tolerance to oxygen shortage in

flooded soils and in solution culture. Plant and Soil 187:37–45.

Jones, D. T., T. V. Armentano, S. Snow, and S. Bass. 1997.

Evidence for flooding effects on vegetation and wildlife in

Everglades National Park, 1994–1995. p. 31–45. In T. V.

Armentano (ed.) Ecological Assessment of the 1994–1995 High

Water Conditions in the Southern Everglades. South Florida

Management and Coordination Working Group, Miami, FL,

USA.


Keeley, J. E. 1979. Population differentiation along a flood

frequency gradient: physiological adaptations to flooding in

Nyssa sylvatica. Ecological Monographs 49:89–108.

Keppel, G. 1973. Design and Analysis: A Researcher’s Hand-

book. Prentice Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA.

Kozlowski, T. T. 1982. Water supply and tree growth. II.

Flooding. Forestry Abstracts 43:145–161.

Kozlowski, T. T. 1984. Plant responses to flooding of soil.

Bioscience 34:162–167.

Kozlowski, T. T., P. J. Kramer, and S. G. Pallardy. 1991. The

Physiological Ecology of Woody Plants. Academic Press,

London, UK.

Kozlowski, T. T. and S. G. Pallardy. 2002. Acclimation and

adaptive responses of woody plants to environmental stresses.

Botanical Review 68:270–334.

Larson, J. S., M. S. Bedinger, C. F. Bryan, S. Brown, R. I.

Huffman, E. L. Miller, D. G. Rhodes, and B. A. Touchet. 1981.

Transition

from

wetlands


to

uplands


in

southeastern

bottomland

hardwood


forests.

p. 225–269.

In

J.

R.



Clark and J. Benfrado (eds.) Wetlands in Bottomland

Hardwood Forests. Elsevier Scientific Publishing, New York,

NY, USA.

Little, E. L. 1978. Atlas of United States Trees, Volume 5:

Florida. Miscellaneous Publication No. 1361. U.S. Department

of Agriculture, Washington, DC, USA.

Liu, F. and H. Stutzel. 2002. Leaf water relations of vegetable

amaranth (Amaranthus spp.) in response to soil drying.

European Journal of Agronomy 16:137–150.

Lopez, O. R. and T. A. Kursar. 1999. Flood tolerance of four

tropical tree species. Tree Physiology 19:925–932.

Loveless, C. M. 1959. A study of the vegetation in the Florida

Everglades. Ecology 40:1–9.

Maceina, M. J., P. W. Bettoli, and D. R. DeVries. 1994. Use of

split-plot analysis of variance design for repeated-measures

fishery data. Fisheries 19:14–20.

McKevlin, M. R., D. D. Hook, and A. A. Rozelle. 1998.

Adaptations of plants to flooding and soil waterlogging.

p. 173–203. In M. G. Messina and W. H. Conner (eds.)

Southern Forested Wetlands, Ecology and Management. Lewis

Publishers, Boca Raton, FL, USA.

McKnight, J. S., D. D. Hook, O. G. Langdon, and R. L.

Johnson. 1981. Flood tolerance and related characteristics of

trees of the bottomland forests of the southern United States.

p. 29–69. In J. R. Clark and J. Benfrado (eds.) Wetlands in

Bottomland Hardwood Forests. Elsevier Scientific Publishing,

New York, NY, USA.

McPherson, B. F. 1973. Vegetation in relation to water depth in

Conservation Area 3, Florida. U.S.

Geological

Survey,

Tallahassee, FL, USA. Open File Report 73025.



Meredith, M. P. and S. V. Stehman. 1991. Repeated measures

experiments in forestry: focus on analysis of response curves.

Canadian Journal of Forest Research 21:957–965.

Mitsch, W. J. and W. G. Rust. 1984. Tree growth responses to

flooding in a bottomland forest in northeastern Illinois. Forest

Science 30:499–510.

O

¨ gren, E. and G. O



¨ quist. 1985. Effects of drought on

photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence and photoinhibition

susceptibility in intact willow leaves. Planta 166:380–388.

Pereira, J. S. and T. T. Kozlowski. 1977. Variations among

woody angiosperms in response to flooding. Physiologia

Plantarum 41:184–192.

Pezeshki, S. R. and J. L. Chambers. 1986. Variation in flood-

induced stomatal photosynthetic responses of three bottomland

tree species. Forest Science 32:914–923.

Regehr, D. L., F. A. Bazzaz, and W. R. Boggess. 1975.

Photosynthesis, transpiration and leaf conductance of Populus

deltoides in relation to flooding and drought. Photosynthetica

9:52–61.

Jones et al., TREE RESPONSES TO HYDROLOGIC REGIMES

843


Schmull, M. and F. M. Thomas. 2000. Morphological and

physiological reactions of young deciduous trees (Quercus robur

L., Q. petraea [Matt.] Lieb., Fagus sylvatica L.) to waterlogging.

Plant and Soil 225:227–242.

Schortemeyer, J. L. 1980. An evaluation of water management

practices for optimum wildlife benefits in Conservation Area

3A. Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission,

Tallahassee, FL, USA.

Sklar, F. H. and A. van der Valk (eds.). 2002a. Tree Islands of the

Everglades. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The

Netherlands.

Sklar, F. H. and A. van der Valk. 2002b. Tree islands of the

Everglades: an overview. p. 1–18. In F. H. Sklar and A. van der

Valk (eds.) Tree Islands of the Everglades. Kluwer Academic

Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands.

Slavı´k, B. 1974. Methods of Studying Plant Water Relations.

Ecological Studies, Volume 9. Springer-Verlag, New York,

NY, USA.


Smirnoff, N. and R. M. M. Crawford. 1983. Variation in the

structure and response to flooding of root aerenchyma in some

wetland plants. Annals of Botany 51:237–249.

Sojka, R. E. 1992. Stomatal closure in oxygen-stressed plants.

Soil Science 154:269–280.

Teulat, B., P. Monneveux, J. Wery, C. Borries, I. Souyris, A.

Charrier, and D. This. 1997. Relationships between relative

water content and growth parameters under water stress in

barley: a QTL study. New Phytologist 137:99–107.

Tomlinson, P. B. 1980. The Biology of Trees Native to Tropical

Florida. Harvard University Printing Office, Allston, MA, USA.

USACE. 1999. Central and Southern Florida Project, Compre-

hensive Review Study, Volume 1, Final Integrated Feasibility

Report and Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District, Jackson-

ville, FL, USA.

van der Valk, A. and F. H. Sklar. 2002. What we know and

should know about tree islands. p. 499–522. In F. H. Sklar and

A. van der Valk (eds.) Tree Islands of the Everglades. Kluwer

Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands.

Vartapetian, B. B. and M. B. Jackson. 1997. Plant adaptations

to anaerobic stress. Annals of Botany 79 (Supplement A):

3–20.

Vu, J. C. V. and G. Yelenosky. 1991. Photosynthetic responses of



citrus trees to soil flooding. Physiologia Planatarum 81:7–14.

Wallace, P. M., D. M. Kent, and D. R. Rich. 1996. Responses of

wetland tree species to hydrology and soils. Restoration

Ecology 4:33–41.

Wetzel, P. R. 2002. Analysis of tree island vegetation communi-

ties. p. 357–389. In F. H. Sklar and A. van der Valk (eds.) Tree

Islands of the Everglades. Kluwer Academic Publishers,

Dordrecht, The Netherlands.

Wunderlin, R. P. 1998. Guide to the Vascular Plants of Florida.

University Press of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Zotz, G., M. T. Tyree, and S. Patino. 1997. Hydraulic

architecture and water relations of a flood-tolerant tropical

tree, Annona glabra. Tree Physiology 17:359–365.

Manuscript received 13 August 2004; revisions received 25 July

2005 and 17 February 2006; accepted 2 June 2006.

844


WETLANDS, Volume 26, No. 3, 2006

Yüklə 395,24 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə