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12. West of 

Woodanilling 

Great 


Southern 

Woodanilling Shire 

of 

Woodanilling 



Road Reserve 

Shire of Woodanilling 

13. East of Aldersyde 

Great 


Southern 

Brookton Shire 

of 

Brookton 



Reserve (gravel 

pit) 


Shire of Brookton 

14a. South of Pingelly 

Great 


Southern

 

Cuballing Conservation 



Commission of 

WA 


Conservation of 

Flora and Fauna 

DEC 

14b. South of Pingelly 



Great 

Southern


 

Cuballing Conservation 

Commission of 

WA 


Conservation of 

Flora and Fauna 

DEC 

14c. South of Pingelly 



Great 

Southern 

Cuballing Conservation 

Commission of 

WA 

Conservation of 



Flora and Fauna 

DEC 


15. North of Kojonup 

Great 


Southern 

Woodanilling MRWA 

Road 

Reserve 


MRWA 

16. SE of Armadale 

Perth Hills 

Armadale Land 

and 


Forests 

Commission 

State Forest 

DEC 


Note: Populations in bold text are considered to be important populations, MRWA = Main Roads Western Australia. 

 

Biology and ecology 

 

Research conducted into the reproductive biology and ecology of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. 



fimbrilepis by Yates and Ladd (2005) found that insect visitors to the taxon included wasps, bees, flies, 

beetles and butterflies. The diversity of insect visitors to flowers, rates of pollination, and seed production 

were equal or greater for small populations on road reserves compared with the larger populations in 

conservation reserves.  

 

Yates and Ladd (2005) also concluded that seeds of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis remained 



dormant in the soil for at least 30 months. Germination of soil-stored seed was stimulated by the use of 

smoke. Adult plants were killed by fire but mass recruitment from soil-stored seed occurred in the first 

and second winters following. Seedling survival depended on water availability, nutrient levels and 

grazing pressure. Fire suppression may adversely affect the Verticordia as most populations are declining 

 

6


 

Recovery Plan for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

and cannot recover without the occurrence of fire. Small, fragmented populations however, are more 

affected by weeds which are also abundant after fire, thereby outweighing any positive effects of fire 

without intervention management. 

 

Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis is considered susceptible to dieback  caused by Phytophthora 

cinnamomi with 80% mortality observed after testing 20 individuals. 

 

Threats 



 

Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp.  fimbrilepis was declared as Rare Flora under the Western Australian 

Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 on 25 September 1987 and is currently ranked Vulnerable in WA against 

IUCN (2001) criteria. The subspecies is listed under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity 



Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act 1999) as Endangered. The main threats to the subspecies are insecure 

land tenure, road maintenance activities, weed invasion, poor recruitment, inappropriate fire regimes, 

grazing, trampling, feral pigs, Phytophthora dieback, powerline maintenance, salinity, farming activities 

and gravel extraction. 

 



 



Insecure land tenure. The majority of populations are found on land tenure that is not consistent 

with conservation and is of poor and deteriorating quality. 

 

Road maintenance activities threaten Populations 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, 13 and 15. Threats include 



grading, chemical spraying, construction of drainage channels and the mowing/maintenance of 

roadside vegetation. Several of these actions also encourage weed invasion. 

 

Habitat degradation by weed invasion is a threat to Populations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12 and 13. 



Weeds suppress early plant growth by competing for soil moisture, nutrients and light. They also 

increase the fire hazard due to the easy ignition of high fuel loads, which are produced annually by 

many grass weed species. 

 



Poor recruitment has been observed in all populations, possibly due to a reduction of fire or other 

factors that may influence reproduction. 

 

Inappropriate fire regimes may affect the viability of populations. As seeds of Verticordia 



fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis germinate following fire, occasional fires are needed for reproduction, 

however, the soil seed bank would rapidly be depleted if fires recurred before regenerating or 

juvenile plants reached maturity. Fire may facilitate weed invasion and should be followed up with 

appropriate weed control. 

 

Grazing and trampling by stock (sheep) and rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are a threat to 



Populations 3, 4, 7, 8, 13 and 14. As well as directly grazing Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. 

fimbrilepis, the animals impact on the habitat by potentially spreading dieback and also by digging, 

trampling and breaking foliage. An increased nutrient level in the soil from droppings is likely and 

may encourage weed invasion. Grazing would have an impact on the establishment of young plants 

of V. fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis thereby limiting natural recruitment. 

 

Feral Pigs (Sus scrofa)  have been recorded in Population 16. Feral Pigs can directly damage the 



subspecies and its habitat when digging in search of food. They can also introduce weed seeds and 

nutrients. Soil disturbance also encourages the establishment of weeds. 

 

Phytophthora dieback caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, a pathogen that causes root rot resulting 



in susceptible plants dying of drought stress, is a threat to Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis

Although it is not known if the pathogen is prevalent in the area of populations, the subspecies is 

considered to be susceptible to the pathogen.  

 



Powerline maintenance is a potential threat to Populations 2 and 3. Disturbance during 

maintenance may encourage weed invasion and also directly damage plants. Western Power has 

been notified of the populations. 

 



Salinity  is a potential threat to Population 3. The vegetation in the reserve where the subspecies 

occurs is being impacted by salinity with EM38 readings ranging from 52 to 92 (slightly saline). It is 

not known how Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis will respond to changes in soil salt levels.

 

 



 

Farming activities including fence maintenance and spray drift are a threat to Populations 4 and 12. 

Part of Population 4 is located near a property gate and maintenance may damage the population. 

 

7



 

Recovery Plan for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

Herbicide and fertilizer applied on properties adjacent to Populations 4 and 12 have the potential to 

drift onto the road reserve. 

 

Gravel extraction is a threat to Population 13 as it occurs in an active gravel pit. The subspecies 



may be damaged or completely removed during this process, and the risk of increasing the spread of 

dieback disease through the area is increased. Gravel extraction is also a potential risk to 

Subpopulation 8c as the area is a possible future source of gravel for the Shire. 

 

 



The intent of this plan is to provide actions that will deal with immediate threats to Verticordia 

fimbrilepis subsp.  fimbrilepis. Although climate change may have a long-term effect on the subspecies, 

actions taken directly to prevent the impact of climate change are beyond the scope of this plan. 

 

Table 2. Summary of population information and threats 

 

Pop. No. & Location 



Land Status  Year / No. of plants 

Current 

Condition 

Threats 

1. West of Woodanilling  Shire Road 

Reserve 

1984 


1987 

1991 


1996 

1998 


1999 

53 


17 

13 


11 

4 [1] 


6 [2] 

Poor 


Weeds, road maintenance 

2. West of Woodanilling  Shire Road 

Reserve 

1984 


1987 

1988 


1991 

1996 


1997 

1998 


1999 

20 


10 




Population 



extinct 

Road maintenance, weeds, powerline 

maintenance 

3. South of Arthur River  Nature 

Reserve 

1987 


1991 

1994 


1996 

1998 


1999 

2000 


28 


3 [2] 


4 (1) 

3 [1] 


0 [4] 

Poor 


Powerline maintenance, salinity, weeds, 

grazing, trampling 

4. SE of Aldersyde 

Shire Road 

Reserve 

1993 


1995 

1997 


1998 

2005 


50 

46 


83 (7) 

83 


61 

Poor 


Road maintenance, farming activities, 

grazing (rabbits), weeds 

5a. NE of Kojonup 

Shire Road 

Reserve 

1992 


1996 

1999 




Poor 

Road maintenance, weeds 

5b. NE of Kojonup 

Private 


Property 

1999 


2000 

2001 


95 

100 


25 

Healthy  

6. East of Narrogin 

Shire Road 

Reserve 

1992 


1995 

1997 


2003 

17 


13 



Poor 

Road maintenance, weeds 

7a. SE of Aldersyde 

Shire Road 

Reserve 

1995 


1996 

1998 


100 (230) 

330 


796+ 

Healthy 


Road maintenance, weeds, grazing 

(rabbits) 

7b. SE of Aldersyde 

Nature 


Reserve 

1995 


1998 

305+ 



Healthy Grazing 

(rabbits) 

8a. Aldersyde 

Shire Road 

Reserve 

1995 


1996 

1998 


2005 



Disturbed 



Road maintenance, weeds, grazing 

(rabbits) 

8b. West of Aldersyde 

Shire Road 

Reserve 

1997 


1998 

40 


40 

Moderate 

Road maintenance, weeds 

8c. West of Aldersyde 

Shire 

1995 


23 

Healthy 


Weeds, grazing, gravel extraction 

 

8



 

Recovery Plan for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

Reserve 

(Parklands 

and 

Recreation) 



1998 

2006 


27 

2 [1] 


8d. West of Aldersyde 

Shire 


Reserve 

1995 


1998 

2005 


17 

10 


12 [2] 

Healthy Weeds, 

grazing 

8e. West of Aldersyde 

Shire 

Reserve 


1999 

2005 


43 

30 


Healthy Weeds, 

grazing 


9. West of Brookton 

Water 


Reserve 

1970 0 


Population 

extinct 


Phytophthora dieback 

10. NE of North 

Bannister 

State Forest 

2000 

2003 


757 (100+) 

10040 


Healthy  

11. NE of North 

Bannister 

State Forest 

2000 

2003 


2000+ (2000+) 

19120 


Healthy  

12. West of Woodanilling Shire Road 

Reserve 

1999 


2005 

185 (6) 


77 [5] 

Moderate 

Road maintenance, weeds, farming 

activities 

13. East of Aldersyde 

Shire 


Reserve 

(Gravel pit) 

2005 



 



Road maintenance, weeds, grazing, gravel 

extraction 

14a. South of Pingelly 

Nature 


Reserve 

2001 482 

Healthy 

Phytophthora dieback 

14b. South of Pingelly 

Nature 

Reserve 


2001 12 

Healthy 


Phytophthora dieback 

14c. South of Pingelly 

Nature 

Reserve 


2004 

110+ (9) [1] 

Healthy 

Phytophthora dieback, grazing (rabbits) 

15. North of Kojonup 

MRWA 

Road 


Reserve 

2003 10 


Moderate 

Road 


maintenance 

16. SE of Armadale 

State Forest 2009 5000+ 

Healthy 


Feral 

pigs 


Note: * = total for both subpopulations, ( ) = number of seedlings, [ ] = number dead, MRWA = Main Roads Western 

Australia. 

 

Guide for decision-makers 

 

Section 1 provides details of current and possible future threats. Actions for development and/or land 



clearing in the immediate vicinity of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis may require assessment.  

 

Action



ly result in a significant impact on the 

specie


s that could result in any of the following may potential

 



s: 

 habitat 

 

ed or potential habitat 



Damage or destruction of occupied or potential

 



Alteration of the local surface hydrology or drainage of occupi

Reduction in population size of any population 

 

a major increase in disturbance in the vicinity of a population 



 

Habitat critical to the survival of the species, and important populations 

 

It is considered that the habitat for populations 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 14 and 16 is critical to the survival of 



Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis and that these populations are important populations. Habitat 

critical to the survival of V. fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis includes the area of occupancy of these 

populations, areas of similar habitat surrounding these populations (these providing potential habitat for 

population expansion and for pollinators), additional occurrences of similar habitat that may contain 

undiscovered populations of the subspecies or be suitable for future translocations, and the local 

catchment of these populations for the surface and/or groundwater that maintains the habitat of the 

subspecies. 

 

 



9

 

Recovery Plan for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 



Benefits to other species or ecological communities 

 

Recovery actions implemented to improve the quality or security of the habitat of Verticordia fimbrilepis 



subsp. fimbrilepis will also improve the status of other rare species and associated native vegetation. Four 

Declared Rare Flora (DRF) species and 15 Priority flora taxa occur within 500 m of V. fimbrilepis subsp. 



fimbrilepis. These taxa are listed in the table below: 

 

Table 3. Conservation–listed flora species occurring within 500m of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. 



fimbrilepis 

Species name 

Conservation Status (WA) 

Conservation Status  

(EPBC Act 1999) 

Banksia ionthocarpa subsp. chrysophoenix 

DRF (CR) 

Endangered 

Hemigenia ramosissima 

DRF (CR) 

Critically Endangered 

Conostylis drummondii 

DRF (EN) 

Endangered 

Tribonanthes purpurea 

DRF (VU) 

Vulnerable 

Banksia dallanneyi subsp. agricola 

Priority 2 



Calytrix sp. Jingaring 

Priority 2 



Leucopogon cymbiformis 

Priority 2 



Stylidium emarginatum subsp. exappendiculatum 

Priority 2 



Trichocline  sp.Treeton (B.J. Keighery & N. Gibson 564). 

Priority 2 



Acacia anarthros 

Priority 3 



Anigozanthos bicolor subsp. exstans 

Priority 3 



Brachyloma mogin 

Priority 3 



Goodenia trichophylla 

Priority 3 



Grevillea manglesii subsp. dissectifolia 

Priority 3 



Stylidium marradongense 

Priority 3 



Stylidium pseudohirsutum 

Priority 3 



Synaphea drummondii 

Priority 3 



Anthotium junciforme 

Priority 4 



Calothamnus brevifolius 

Priority 4 



Verreauxia verreauxii 

Priority 4 

For a description of the Priority categories see Atkins (2009). 



 

Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis at Subpopulation 5b occurs within one kilometre of a Priority 

Ecological Community (PEC). This PEC is described as Claypans with mid dense shrublands of 



Melaleuca lateritia over herbs. 

 

Table 4: Threatened Ecological Communities that Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis occurs 



near 

Community Name 

Conservation status (WA) 

Conservation Status (EPBC Act 1999) 

Claypans with dense shrublands of Melaleuca lateritia 

over herbs 

Priority 1 

For a description of the PEC categories see DEC (2007) 



 

International obligations 

 

This plan is fully consistent with the aims and recommendations of the Convention on Biological 



Diversity, ratified by Australia in June 1993, and will assist in implementing Australia’s responsibilities 

under that Convention. The subspecies is listed under Appendix II in the United Nations Environment 

Program World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) Convention on International Trade in 

Endangered Species (CITES), however this plan does not affect Australia’s obligations under any other 

international agreements. 

 

Indigenous Consultation 

 

A search of the Department of Indigenous Affairs Aboriginal Heritage Sites Register has identified two 



sites of Aboriginal significance in the areas of Populations 3 and 7. These sites are listed as Measles 

Bridge Camp (#19933) a historical camp (open, no restrictions) and Nalya/Brookton (#5718) man-made 

structure (open, no restrictions). 

 

10



 

Recovery Plan for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

 

Input and involvement has been sought through the South West Aboriginal Land and Sea Council 



(SWALSC) and Department of Indigenous Affairs to determine if there are any issues or interests. As this 

is not expected to be completed before adoption of the Recovery plan, further consultation has been 

included as a recovery action to ensure there has been Indigenous engagement in relation to the recovery 

actions proposed in this plan. 

 

Social and economic impacts 

 

Subpopulation 5b occurs on private property; and Population 13 occurs on land where gravel is extracted 



and the protection of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis may potentially affect development on 

these sites. Two sites of Aboriginal significance also occur in the areas of Populations 3 and 7 and 

recovery actions may potentially impact on Indigenous interests. 

 

Affected interests 

 

Affected interests are relevant Indigenous groups, local Shires, Western Power, Main Roads WA, 



Department of Water and private landholders. 

 

 



Evaluation of the Plan’s Performance 

 

The DEC in conjunction with the Swan Region Threatened Flora and Communities Recovery Team 



(SRTFCRT) and Great Southern Region Threatened Flora Recovery Team (GSRTFRT) will evaluate the 

performance of this plan. In addition to annual reporting on progress and evaluation against the criteria 

for success and failure, the plan will be reviewed following four years of implementation. 

 

2. 



RECOVERY OBJECTIVE AND CRITERIA 

 

Objective 

 

The objective of this Recovery Plan is to abate identified threats and maintain or enhance in situ 



populations to ensure the long-term preservation of the subspecies in the wild. 

 

Criteria for success: The number of populations has increased and/or the number of mature individuals 

has increased by ten percent or more over the term of the plan. 

Criteria for failure: The number of populations has decreased and/or the number of mature individuals 

has decreased by ten percent or more over the term of the plan. 

 

 

3. RECOVERY 



ACTIONS 

 

Existing recovery actions 

 

Relevant stakeholders have been made aware of the existence of this subspecies and its locations. These 



notifications detail the current status of the species as Declared Rare Flora (DRF) and the associated legal 

obligations in regards to their protection. 

 

Declared Rare Flora (DRF) markers have been installed at Populations 1, 2, 4, 6 and 12 and 



Subpopulations 5a and 5b. These serve to alert people working in the vicinity to the presence of the DRF 

and the need to avoid work that may damage plants or their habitat. Dashboard stickers and posters 

describing the significance of DRF markers have been produced and distributed. 

 

In July 1998, 150 plants of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis were translocated into a proposed 



Timber Reserve near Beaufort (Bone and Graham 1998). All plants were grown from cuttings taken from 

five plants in Population 3 and grown by the Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority (BGPA). The 

 

11


 

Recovery Plan for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

translocation was conducted on an experimental basis and has provided information about effective 

techniques for future translocations. Three treatments were tested: water, mulch and control (no watering 

or mulching). The number of surviving plants, height, crown width, reproductive state, number of 

inflorescences and follicles, and general health are being monitored. By March 1999, 56 of 150 

introduced plants (37.3%) were dead. The least number of deaths (26%) were in watered plants and the 

most (44%) were in mulched plants. In March 2004, only five plants were still alive. Native grass had re-

established at the site along with wild oats and veldt grass. 

 

Weed control trials were conducted by DEC Katanning District at Population 1 following an uncontrolled 



fire in 1990. The population, located on a road reserve, was heavily infested with Veldt grass (Ehrharta 

longiflora) and the grass-selective herbicide, Fusilade

®

, was applied twice per year from 1993 to 1996. 



Initially, a smaller area of 200m

2

 was sprayed covering eight Verticordia plants. Then in 1994, the trial 



was expanded to include the whole population. During the three years of the trial, no detrimental effects 

were noted on any Verticordia plants. Although a reduction in grass mass was observed other bulbous 

and broadleaf weeds, which Fusilade

®

 did not control, replaced them. Also Guildford grass (Romulea 



rosea) became abundant.  

 

In 1997, Robert Buehrig conducted surveys for new populations of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. 



fimbrilepis. Over 40 waypoints were visited from Aldersyde southward to Woodanilling but no new 

populations were found (Buehrig 1997). 

 

In 2009, a new population of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis was found south east of Armadale 



by Fred and Jean Hort. 

 

Some 31,535 Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis seeds collected between 1996 and 2004 are stored 



in DEC’s Threatened Flora Seed Centre at –18

C and 4C (Table 5). The TFSC test the viability of the 

seed and the initial germination rate was found to range from 29 to 92%, averaging 53% (A. Cochrane 

unpublished data). 

 

Table 5: DEC’s Threatened Flora Seed Centre collections for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. 

fimbrilepis 

Date 

Population No. 

No. seeds 

Germination (%) 

24 January 1996 

670 


38 

24 January 1996 

2988 


92 

24 January 1996 

5242 


86 

20 February 1996 

1945 


48 

20 February 1996 

2437 


39 

20 February 1996 

723 


64 

2 March 1997 

3462 


77 

2 March 1997 

1228 


62 

2 March 1997 

227 


30 

20 January 1998 

946 


29 

21 January 1998, 3 February 1998, 2 February 

1998 

1 228 


35 

4 February 1998 

5255 


83 

4 February 1998 

405 


38 

9 February 2000 

488 


31 

11 February 2000 

10 

668 


38 

12 February 2004 

14 

4623 


Test not complete 

 

A further collection of approximately 9.6 g of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis seed from 20 



plants at Subpopulation 7b was made in January 2000 by DEC’s Colin Yates. The seed was forwarded to 

the Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority (BGPA) for storage. 

 

Cutting material from Population 3 was collected in 1994, 1997, 1998, 1999 and 2000 and forwarded to 



the BGPA at Kings Park for propagation. Of the 3,061 propagules (eight from graftings; 3,053 from 

cuttings), 702 struck, with an average propagation rate of approximately 25%. The majority of the 

 

12


 

Recovery Plan for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

material grown between 1999 and 2000 was used for a translocation with the remainder since dying. The 

only living specimens currently at Kings Park are two plants, approximately 12 months old, which were 

germinated by the TFSC from seed collected at Population 14 on February 2004. 

 

Staff from DEC’s Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts regularly monitor populations. 



 

The SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT are overseeing the implementation of this recovery plan and will include 

information on progress in their annual report to DEC’s Corporate Executive and funding bodies.  

 

RECOVERY ACTIONS 

 

Where recovery actions occur on lands other than those managed by DEC, permission has been or will be 



sought from appropriate owners/land managers prior to recovery actions being undertaken. The following 

recovery actions are generally in order of descending priority, influenced by their timing over the life of 

the plan. However this should not constrain addressing any of the actions if funding is available and other 

opportunities arise. 

 

1. 

Coordinate recovery actions 

 

The SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT will continue to oversee the implementation of recovery actions for 



Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis and will include information on progress in their annual report 

to DEC's Corporate Executive and funding bodies. 

 

Action: 

Coordinate recovery actions 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Swan Region and Great Southern District) through the SRTFCRT and 

GSDTFRT 

Cost:  

$6,000 per year 



 

2. Stimulate 

germination 

 

Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis appears to 

germinate well following smoke water treatment or 

fire. Further treatments will be undertaken at senescing populations. Records will need to be maintained 

for future research. Any disturbance trials will need to be undertaken in conjunction with weed control. 

 

Action: Stimulate 

germination 

Responsibility:  

DEC (Science Division, Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) through the 

SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

Cost:  

$7,000 in years 1 and 3, $2,000 in years 2, 4 and 5 

 

3. 

Install Declared Rare Flora (DRF) markers or replace where necessary 

 

DRF markers are required at Population 15 and need to be replaced at Population 4. 



 

Action: 

Install DRF markers or replace where necessary 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Great Southern District) through the GSDTFRT 



Cost:  

$3,000 in year 1 

 

4. 

Undertake weed control and follow up with additional control if required 

 

Weeds are a major threat to most populations and control is required. The following tasks will be 



undertaken: 

 

1.



 

Determine which weeds are present and map them. 

2.

 

Select appropriate technique; herbicide, mowing or hand weeding. 



 

13


 

Recovery Plan for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

3.

 

Control invasive weeds by hand removal and/or spot spraying around the Verticordia fimbrilepis 



subsp. fimbrilepis plants when weeds first emerge. 

4.

 



Revegetation with site-specific species is required (in Autumn) to maintain low weed levels. 

5.

 



Monitor the success of the treatment on weed death, and the tolerance of Verticordia fimbrilepis 

subsp. fimbrilepis and associated native plant species to the treatment. 

6.

 

Report on the method and success of the threatment, and effect on Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. 



fimbrilepis plants and associated species. 

 

Action: 

Undertake weed control and follow up with additional control if required 

Responsibility: 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) through the SRTFCRT and 

GSDTFRT 

Cost:  

$6,000 per year, as required 

 

5. 

Maintain disease hygiene 

 

Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis is susceptible to dieback caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi

Dieback hygiene (outlined in CALM 2003 (now DEC)) will be followed for activities such as installation 

and maintenance of firebreaks and when walking into populations in wet soil conditions. Purpose built 

signs advising of the dieback risk and high conservation values of the sites will be installed where 

required.  



 

Action: 

Maintain disease hygiene  



Responsibility: 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) through the SRTFCRT and 

GSDTFRT 

Cost:  

$2,000 per year 

 

6. Monitor 

populations 

 

Monitoring of factors such as weed invasion, habitat degradation, hydrology (including salinity), 



population stability (expansion or decline), pollinator activity, seed production, recruitment, and 

longevity is essential. The populations will be inspected and an accurate location recorded. 

 

Action: Monitor 

populations 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) through the SRTFCRT and 

GSDTFRT 

Cost:  

$10,000 per year 

 

7. Rehabilitate 

habitat 

 

Once gravel extraction has finished at the site, disturbed areas in the habitat containing Population 13 



should be deep ripped and allowed to regenerate naturally. 

 

Action: Rehabilitate 

habitat 


Responsibility: 

DEC (Great Southern District) through the GSDTFRT 



Cost:  

$5,000 in first year 

 

8. 

Collect seed and other material to preserve genetic diversity 

 

Although a large number of seeds have been collected, the subspecies is not well represented in the seed 



store. The germination rate for most of the seed collected is relatively low so the actual number of 

germinants that can be produced is also quite low. Populations 10, 11 and 16 will be the priority for seed 

collection as they account for a large percentage of known plants.  

 

Action: 

Collect seed and other material to preserve genetic diversity 

 

14



 

Recovery Plan for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts, TFSC), BGPA through the 

SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

Cost:  $5,000 

per 


year 

 

9. 



Implement rabbit control where necessary 

 

The level of threat posed by rabbits in Populations 4, 7, 8, 13 and 14 appears to vary from year to year. 



When monitoring ascertains the threat is high, control measures may be required. Control should be 

undertaken in summer when less green feed is available as an alternative food source. 

 

Action

Implement rabbit control where necessary 



Responsibility

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) through the SRTFCRT and 

GSDTFRT; relevant land managers 

Cost: 

$7,000 in years 1, 3 and 5 

 

10. 

Implement feral pig control where necessary 

Feral pigs can damage threatened flora and its habitat when digging in search of food. Pigs can also 

introduce weed seeds and nutrients and the soil disturbance encourages establishment of weeds. Feral pig 

activity has been recorded at Population 16 and control may be necessary. 

 

Action

Implement feral pig control where necessary 



Responsibility

DEC (Perth Hills District) through the SRTFCRT 



Cost: $5,000 

per 


year 

 

11. 



Develop and implement a fire response strategy 

 

Fire will be prevented from occurring in the habitat of populations, except where it is being used 



experimentally as a recovery tool. A fire response strategy will be developed that recommends fire 

frequency, intensity, season, and control measures. 

 

Action: 

Develop and implement a fire response strategy 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) through the SRTFCRT and 

GSDTFRT 

Cost:  

$10,000 in first year and $2,000 in subsequent years 

 

12. 

Conduct further surveys 

 

It is recommended that areas of potential habitat be surveyed for the presence of Verticordia fimbrilepis 



subsp. fimbrilepis during its flowering period between July and December.  

 

All surveyed areas will be recorded and the presence or absence of the subspecies documented to increase 



survey efficiency and reduce unnecessary duplicate surveys. Where possible, volunteers from the local 

community, Landcare groups, wildflower societies and naturalists clubs will be encouraged to be 

involved. 

 

Action: 

Conduct further surveys 

Responsibility: 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) through the SRTFCRT and 

GSDTFRT 

Cost:  

$5,000 in years 1, 3 and 5 

 

13. 

Achieve long-term protection of habitat 

 

DEC will investigate the possibility of land containing populations of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. 



fimbrilepis being declared as reserves. 

 

15



 

Recovery Plan for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

 

Action: 

Achieve long-term protection of habitat 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts, Land Unit); Department of 

Planning (DoP); Department of Mines and Petroleum (DMP), through the 

SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 



Cost:  

$3,000 per year 

 

14. 

Map habitat critical to the survival of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

 

Although habitat critical to the survival of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis  is alluded to in 



Section 1, it has not yet been mapped. If additional populations are located, then habitat critical to their 

survival will also be determined and mapped. 

 

Action: 

Map habitat critical to the survival of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 



Responsibility: 

DEC (SCB, Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) through the SRTFCRT and 

GSDTFRT 

Cost: 

$6,000 in year 2 

 

15. 

Liaise with relevant land managers and Indigenous groups 

 

Staff from DEC’s Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts will liaise with relevant land managers to 



ensure that populations of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis are not accidentaly damaged or 

destroyed. Indigenous consultation will also take place to determine if there are any issues or interests in 

areas that are habitat for Vfimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis

 

Action: 

Liaise with relevant land managers and Indigenous groups 

Responsibility: 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) through the SRTFCRT and 

GSDTFRT 

Cost:  

$2,000 per year 

 

16. Promote 

awareness 

 

The importance of biodiversity conservation and the protection of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. 



fimbrilepis will be promoted to the public. This will be achieved through an information campaign using 

local print and electronic media and by setting up poster displays. An information sheet that includes a 

description of the plant, its habitat type, threats and management actions, and photos will be produced. 

Formal links with local naturalist groups and interested individuals will also be encouraged. 

 

Action: Promote 

awareness 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts, SCB, Strategic Development and 

Corporate Affairs Division) through the SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

Cost: 

$4,000 in year 1 and $2,000 in years 2-5 

 

17. 

Review the recovery plan and assess the need for further recovery actions 

 

If Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis is still listed as Threatened in WA under IUCN (2001) at the 



end of the five-year term (WA) of this recovery plan, the need for further recovery actions, or a review 

will be undertaken and a revised plan prepared if necessary. 

 

Action: 

Review the plan and assess the need for further recovery actions 



Responsibility: 

DEC (SCB, Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) through the SRTFCRT and 

GSDTFRT 

Cost:  

$3,000 in year 5 

 

Total DEC: $172,500 

 

16



 

Recovery Plan for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 



Total Other: $13,000 

Total External Funding: $112,500 

Total Costs:  

$298,000 

 

Table 6. Summary of Recovery Actions 

 

Recovery Action 

Priority 

Responsibility Completion 

Date 

Coordinate recovery actions 

High 

DEC (Swan Region and Great Southern District) 



through the SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

Ongoing 


Stimulate germination 

High 


DEC (Science Division, Perth Hills and Great 

Southern Districts) through the SRTFCRT and 

GSDTFRT 

2015 


Install DRF markers or replace where 

necessary 

High 

DEC (Great Southern District) through the 



GSDTFRT 

2011 


Undertake weed control and follow 

up with additional control if required 

High 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) 



through the SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

Ongoing 


Maintain disease hygiene 

High 


DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) 

through the SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

Ongoing 

Monitor populations 

High 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) 



through the SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

Ongoing 


Rehabilitate habitat 

High 


DEC (Great Southern District) through the 

GSDTFRT 


2011 

Collect seed and other material to 

preserve genetic diversity 

High 


DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts, 

TFSC), BGPA through the SRTFCRT and 

GSDTFRT 

2015 


Implement rabbit control where 

necessary 

High 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) 



through the SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT; relevant land 

managers 

Ongoing 

Implement feral pig control where 

necessary 

High 


DEC (Perth Hills District) through the SRTFCRT 

Ongoing 


Develop and implement a fire 

management strategy 

High 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) 



through the SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

Developed by 2011 

with 

implementation 



ongoing 

Conduct further surveys 

High 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) 



through the SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

Ongoing 


Achieve long-term protection of 

habitat 


High 

DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts, Land 

Unit); Department of Planning (DoP); Department of 

Mines and Petroleum (DMP), through the SRTFCRT 

and GSDTFRT 

Ongoing 


Map habitat critical to the survival of 

Eremophila glabra subsp. chlorella 

High 


DEC (SCB, Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) 

through the SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

2012 

Liaise with relevant land managers 



and Indigenous groups 

High 


DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) 

through the SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

Ongoing 

Promote awareness 

Medium  DEC (Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts, SCB, 

Strategic Development and Corporate Affairs 

Division) through the SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

Ongoing 


Review the plan and assess the need 

for further recovery actions 

Medium  DEC (SCB, Perth Hills and Great Southern Districts) 

through the SRTFCRT and GSDTFRT 

2015 

 

 



4. TERM 

OF 

PLAN 

 

Western Australia 

This IRP will operate from December 2010 to November 2015 but will remain in force until withdrawn 

or replaced. If the taxon is still ranked Vulnerable (IUCN) by the WA Government after five years, the 

need for further recovery actions and an update of the IRP will be assessed. 

 

Commonwealth 

In accordance with the provisions of the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity 

Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) once adopted, this recovery plan will remain in force until revoked.   

The recovery plan must be reviewed at intervals of not longer than 5 years. 

 

17


 

Recovery Plan for Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

 

18

 



 

5. REFERENCES 

 

Atkins, K. (2009) Declared Rare and Priority Flora List for Western Australia. Department of 



Environment and Conservation, Perth, Western Australia. 

Bone, B. and Graham, M. (1998) Translocation Proposal: Shy Featherflower, Verticordia fimbrilepis 

subsp. fimbrilepis. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Katanning. 

Brown, A., Thomson-Dans, C. and Marchant, N. (Eds). (1998) Western Australia’s Threatened Flora

Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia. 

Buehrig, R.M. (1997) Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis Report. Department of Conservation and 

Land Management, Wanneroo. 

Commonwealth Government of Australia (1999) Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation 

ACT 1999. Government Printer, Canberra. 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1992) Policy Statement No. 44 Wildlife 



Management Programs. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia. 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1994) Policy Statement No. 50 Setting Priorities for 



the Conservation of Western Australia’s Threatened Flora and Fauna. Department of 

Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia. 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (2003) Phytophthora cinnamomi and disease caused 

by it Volume 1 – Management Guidelines. Department of Conservation and Land Management (now 

DEC), Perth, Western Australia. 

Department of Environment and Conservation (2007) Definitions, categories and criteria for Threatened 



and Priority Ecological Communities. Department of Environment and Conservation, Western 

Australia. http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/management-and-protection/threatened-species/wa-s-

threatened-ecological-communities.html. 

George, A.S. (1991) New taxa, combinations and typifications in Verticordia (Myrtaceae: 

Chamelaucieae). Nuytsia 7 (3): 231–394. 

George, A.S. (2002) Verticordia: the turner of hearts. University of Western Australia Press, Crawley. 

Mitchell, M.(1997) Summary of weed control trials in a Declared Rare Flora population; Katanning 

District. Unpublished Report, Department of Conservation and Land Management, Katanning. 

Western Australian Herbarium (1998−)  FloraBase  −  The Western Australian Flora. Department of 

Environment and Conservation. http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/. 

World Conservation Union (2001) IUCN Red List Categories: Version 3.1. Prepared by the IUCN 

Species Survival Commission. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. 

Yates, C.J. and Ladd, P.G. (2005) Relative importance of reproductive biology and establishment ecology 

for persistence of a rare shrub in a fragmented landscape. Conservation Biology 19(1): 239-249. 

 

 

6. TAXONOMIC 



DESCRIPTION 

 

Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

 

George, A.S. (1991) New taxa, combinations and typifications in Verticordia (Myrtaceae: 



Chamelaucieae). Nuytsia 7 (3): 231–394.  

 

Peduncles 2–4 mm long. Petal lamina 1.3–1.5 mm wide, fimbriate. Staminodes fimbriate across broad 



apex, one cilium much longer than the others.   

Recovery Plan for Shy Feather Flower Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

 

 

 

 

 

SUMMARY OF RECOVERY ACTIONS AND INDICATIVE COSTS  

 

 

Year 1 

Year 2 

Year 3 

Year 4 

Year 5 

Recovery Action 

DEC 

Other 

Ext. 

DEC 

Other 

Ext. 

DEC Other  Ext.  DEC Other  Ext.  DEC Other  Ext. 

Coordinate 

recovery 

actions  3000 1000 2000 3000 1000 2000 3000 1000 2000 3000 1000 2000 3000 1000 2000 

Stimulate 

germination 

5000 

 2000 1000 



 1000 5000 

 2000 1000 

 1000 1000 

 1000 


Install DRF markers or 

replace where necessary 

1500  

1500             



Undertake weed control and 

follow up with additional 

control if required 

3000 


 3000 3000 

 3000 3000 

 3000 3000 

 3000 3000 

 3000 

Maintain 



disease 

hygiene 


1000 

 1000 1000 

 1000 1000 

 1000 1000 

 1000 1000 

 1000 


Monitor 

populations 

 

6000 


 4000 6000 

 4000 6000 

 4000 6000 

 4000 6000 

 4000 

Rehabilitate 



habitat 

5000               

Collect seed and other 

material to preserve genetic 

diversity 

2000 1000 2000 2000 1000 2000 2000 1000 2000 2000 1000 2000 2000 1000 2000 

Implement rabbit control 

where necessary  

3500  

3500    


3500  

3500    


3500  

3500 


Implement feral pig control 

where necessary 

3000 

 2000 3000 



 2000 3000 

 2000 3000 

 2000 3000 

 2000 


Develop and implement a fire 

response strategy 

6000 

 4000 1000 



 1000 1000 

 1000 1000 

 1000 1000 

 1000 


Conduct 

further 


surveys 

3000 1000 1000 

 

 

 3000 1000 1000 



 

 

 3000 1000 1000 



Achieve long-term protection 

of habitat 

3000   

3000   


3000   

3000   


3000   

Map habitat critical to the 

survival of Verticordia 

fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis 

   


2000  

4000          

Liaise with relevant land 

managers and Indigenous 

groups 

1000 


 1000 1000 

 1000 1000 

 1000 1000 

 1000 1000 

 1000 

Promote 


awareness 

2000  


2000 

2000   


2000   

2000   


2000   

Review 


this 

IRP 


 

            

1500  

1500 


Total 

48000  3000 29000 28000  2000 21000 36500  3000 22500 26000  2000 17000 34000  3000 23000 



Yearly 

Total 

80,000 51,000 62,000 45,000 60,000 

Ext. = External Funding (funding to be sought), Other = funds already contributed by NHT, volunteer input and BGPA in-kind contribution.  



 

Total DEC: $172,500 

Total Other: $13,000 

Total External Funding: $112,500 

Total Costs:  

$298,000 

Document Outline

  • 1 Project Officer, Species and Communities Branch, DEC, Locked Bag 104, Bentley Delivery Centre, WA 6983.
  • SUMMARY
    • Recovery Criteria
  • 1. BACKGROUND
    • History
      • Distribution and habitat
    • Table 1. Summary of population land vesting, purpose and manager
      • Biology and ecology
        • Table 2. Summary of population information and threats
      • Guide for decision-makers
  • Social and economic impacts
  • Affected interests
  • Evaluation of the Plan’s Performance
    • Objective
    • 3. RECOVERY ACTIONS
    • Existing recovery actions
    • RECOVERY ACTIONS
    • 1. Coordinate recovery actions
    • 2. Stimulate germination
    • 3. Install Declared Rare Flora (DRF) markers or replace where necessary
    • 4. Undertake weed control and follow up with additional control if required
    • 6. Monitor populations
    • 8. Collect seed and other material to preserve genetic diversity
    • 9. Implement rabbit control where necessary
    • Cost: $7,000 in years 1, 3 and 5
    • 11. Develop and implement a fire response strategy
    • 12. Conduct further surveys
      • 13. Achieve long-term protection of habitat
        • 14. Map habitat critical to the survival of Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis
        • 16. Promote awareness
    • Cost: $4,000 in year 1 and $2,000 in years 2-5
      • 17. Review the recovery plan and assess the need for further recovery actions
      • 4. TERM OF PLAN
      • 5. REFERENCES
      • 6. TAXONOMIC DESCRIPTION
      • Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis
        • Liaise with relevant land managers and Indigenous groups
        • Promote awareness
        • Review this IRP 
        • Total
    • Yearly Total

Kataloq: system -> files -> resources -> 0a78054e-2204-49e2-a8b2-bca48db42241 -> files
resources -> Littoral Rainforest and Coastal Vine Thickets of Eastern Australia Ecological Community Draft National Recovery Plan
resources -> Conservation Management Zones of Australia Eastern Australia Tropical Forests and Woodlands
resources -> It is intended that this Plan be implemented over a ten-year period
resources -> Magenta Lilly Pilly Syzygium paniculatum
resources -> Appendix 4 the responses of native australian plant species to phytophthora cinnamomi
resources -> National Recovery Plan Magenta Lilly Pilly Syzygium paniculatum
resources -> 1 Introduction 1 1 Background 1
resources -> Syzygium eucalyptoides
resources -> Fitzgerald biosphere recovery plan
files -> Shy featherflower (Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp fimbrilepis) interim recovery plan

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