Staying Current Mechanisms in cardiovascular diseases: how useful are medical textbooks, eMedicine, and YouTube?



Yüklə 89,82 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix06.02.2017
ölçüsü89,82 Kb.
  1   2   3

Staying Current

Mechanisms in cardiovascular diseases: how useful are medical textbooks,

eMedicine, and YouTube?

Samy A. Azer

College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Submitted 2 January 2014; accepted in final form 20 March 2014



Azer SA. Mechanisms in cardiovascular diseases: how useful are

medical textbooks, eMedicine, and YouTube? Adv Physiol Educ 38:

124 –134, 2014; doi:10.1152/advan.00149.2013.—The aim of this

study was to assess the contents of medical textbooks, eMedicine

(Medscape) topics, and YouTube videos on cardiovascular mecha-

nisms. Medical textbooks, eMedicine articles, and YouTube were

searched for cardiovascular mechanisms. Using appraisal forms,

copies of these resources and videos were evaluated independently

by three assessors. Most textbooks were brief in explaining mech-

anisms. Although the overall average percentage committed to

cardiovascular mechanisms in physiology textbooks (n

ϭ 7) was


16.1% and pathology textbooks (n

ϭ 4) was 17.5%, there was less

emphasis on mechanisms in most internal medicine textbooks (n

ϭ

6), with a total average of 6.9%. In addition, flow diagrams



explaining mechanisms were lacking. However, eMedicine topics

(n

ϭ 48) discussed mechanisms adequately in 22.9% (11 of 48)

topics, and the percentage of content allocated to cardiovascular

mechanisms was higher (15.8%, 46.2 of 292) compared with that

of any internal medicine textbooks. Only 29 YouTube videos

fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of these, 16 YouTube were educa-

tionally useful, scoring 14.1

Ϯ 0.5 (mean Ϯ SD). The remaining 13

videos were not educationally useful, scoring 6.1

Ϯ 1.7. The

concordance between the assessors on applying the criteria mea-

sured by

␬ score was in the range of 0.55– 0.96. In conclusion,

despite the importance of mechanisms, most textbooks and You-

Tube videos were deficient in cardiovascular mechanisms. eMedi-

cine topics discussed cardiovascular mechanisms for some dis-

eases, but there were no flow diagrams or multimedia explaining

mechanisms. These deficiencies in learning resources could add to

the challenges faced by students in understanding cardiovascular

mechanisms.

mechanisms; cardiovascular conditions; textbooks; eMedicine; You-

Tube; basic sciences; pathogenesis; linking basic and clinical sci-

ences; integration of knowledge

CARDIOVASCULAR MECHANISMS

are integral components in un-

derstanding pathophysiological changes of diseases and in

linking basic and clinical sciences in a meaningful way (20).

They also enable learners to examine the etiology and

contributing factors of cardiovascular diseases as well as the

chain of changes caused by the disease processes at molec-

ular, cellular, organ, and body system levels (7, 36). Car-

diovascular mechanisms can also provide an explanation for

the patient’s presenting symptoms and elicited clinical

signs. Therefore, mechanisms represent a system of casualty

outlining processes caused by a disease at its different stages

and providing an explanation for the changes. Mechanisms

could also accommodate not just basic sciences but also

biopsychosocial and behavioral aspects related to cardiovas-

cular diseases (7, 5, 30).

Considering the educational outcomes obtained from learn-

ing mechanisms of diseases, most medical curricula are en-

forcing mechanisms in their teaching/learning approaches. For

example, in problem-based learning (PBL), case-based learn-

ing, task-based learning, and related activities, many schools

have adopted mechanisms in their case template (22, 39). The

educational outcomes that can be obtained from mechanisms

include 1) enabling students to explain their hypotheses for the

patient’s problems identified; 2) encouraging students to inte-

grated knowledge from basic and clinical sciences as well as

biopsychosocial issues in mechanisms; 3) stimulating students

to explore pathophysiological changes at molecular, cellular,

organ, and body system levels; and 4) using basic sciences to

interpret patient’s symptoms, clinical signs, and the results of

clinical investigations (5, 20, 36).

With the introduction of integrated and self-regulated learn-

ing to most medical schools such as PBL and case-based

learning, medical students tend to use a range of learning

resources such as Google, YouTube, and eMedicine (1, 2, 4, 6,

9, 22, 37). This does not necessarily mean a shift from using

recommended or prescribed textbooks. Despite some limita-

tions, textbooks remain one of the key learning resources, but

most student rely, in addition, on online resources such as

eMedicine and YouTube to enhance their understanding and

consolidate the knowledge they need for their learning issues

(14). eMedicine is one of the largest online clinical resources

available to medical professionals, medical students, and the

public. It comprises

Ͼ6,800 articles, each of which is associ-

ated with 1 of 62 clinical subspecialty textbooks (41). Also,

eMedicine topics are authored by board-certified consultants,

and the articles are peer reviewed by several experts to which

the article belongs. YouTube is the largest internet video-

sharing site and is a useful tool in social communication,

advertising, and promoting learning resources to the public and

students (19). Although a few studies have shown that You-

Tube videos could be educationally useful, other studies have

reported concerns about misleading information included in

YouTube videos (4, 6, 25, 26).

The aim of this research was to evaluate the usefulness of the

learning resources commonly used by students including med-

ical textbooks, eMedicine, and YouTube videos on cardiovas-

cular mechanisms, with particular emphasis on the clarity,

quality, and percentage of contents committed to cardiovascu-

lar mechanisms. These resources were selected because they

represent common resources used by medical students to pre-

pare their learning issues. The research question for the study

was as follows: how useful are medical textbooks, eMedicine

(Medscape) topics, and YouTube videos in learning cardiovas-

cular mechanisms? The focus was on the clarity, quality, and

Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: S. A. Azer, Medical

Education Dept., College of Medicine, King Saud Univ., PO Box 2925, Riyadh

11461, Saudi Arabia (e-mail: azer2000@optusnet.com.au).

Adv Physiol Educ 38: 124–134, 2014;

doi:10.1152/advan.00149.2013.

124

1043-4046/14 Copyright © 2014 The American Physiological Society



 by 10.220.33.2 on February 5, 2017

http://advan.physiology.org/

Downloaded from 


adequacy of contents of mechanisms provided in these re-

sources.


METHODS

Medical Textbooks

Searching for textbooks. The aim of this search was to obtain a

representative sample of textbooks in physiology, pathology, and

internal medicine to describe the clarity and adequacy and if there

were any deficiencies in the contents on mechanisms of cardiovascu-

lar diseases. The Google Book search engine was used to search for

textbooks covering human physiology, pathology, and internal med-

icine. The terms used in the search were “physiology” and “human

physiology,” “pathology,” and “internal medicine”. Textbooks in

English published from 2007 onward were selected. Only textbooks

intended for undergraduate medical students were included; textbooks

written for specialties in physiology, pathology, internal medicine, or

other health professionals were not included. Study guides or com-

panion books were excluded. Additionally, the same search terms

were used to search Amazon (http://www.amazon.com) and Barnes &

Noble (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/) websites. Medical text-

books on human physiology, pathology, and internal medicine were

used in this study. These textbooks embodied a representative sample

of undergraduate medical textbooks prescribed in these programs and

comprise the following: 1) they are prescribed in most medical

schools worldwide, 2) they are regularly updated and several editions

have been produced over the years, 3) they are among the bestseller

medical textbooks as per Amazon and the publishers’ websites, and



4) they are reviewed in prestigious medical journals such as the British

Medical JournalJournal of the American Medical Association, and

New England Journal of Medicine.

Evaluation tool. To standardize the evaluation of the information

on mechanisms, quantity was calculated from the actual page content

and percentage of content devoted to mechanisms, reflecting the

commitment of the authors to provide learners with an adequate

understanding of the topic (12). The percentages were calculated by

dividing the actual page count by the total number of pages committed

to cardiovascular diseases/topics and multiplying by 100. The total

number of images and tables in each chapter were identified and

counted. Images and tables explaining mechanisms/pathogenesis were

counted, and the percentages were calculated by dividing the actual

images or tables by the total number of images or tables in the chapter

and multiplied by 100. The clarity, quality, and adequacy of mecha-

nism contents were ranked using a scale of 1–3 (where 1

ϭ poor, ϭ

average, and 3

ϭ adequate/optimum level).



Piloting the evaluation. The aim of piloting was to introduce the

evaluators to the tool, ensure that they were able to use it, and identify

any inconsistencies among the evaluators that might necessitate im-

provement of the tool (44). Before the tool was applied, three chapters

(other than those included in the study) were evaluated by the three

evaluators for their content on mechanisms. The results from the three

evaluators were placed on Excel sheets and were discussed in a

meeting. Inconsistencies and areas that were difficult to assess were

resolved through discussion until a final agreement was reached. The

process was repeated by evaluating three other chapters, and the

agreement between the evaluators was calculated again.

Assessing the textbooks. A total of 65 chapters from 17 textbooks

(7 textbooks on human physiology, 4 textbooks on pathology, and 6

textbooks on internal medicine) were committed to cardiovascular

diseases/system and blood vessels. These chapters were evaluated by

the three evaluators independently. The results from each evaluator

were placed on Excel sheets. The findings were discussed among the

evaluators. The agreement between the three evaluators was calcu-

lated using Cohen’s

␬ interrater correlation.

eMedicine Cardiovascular Topics

Selection of topics. eMedicine (www.emedicine.com) was searched

on October 12, 2013 for cardiorespiratory topics. The aim of this

search was to obtain a representation of the cardiovascular topics

commonly used by undergraduate medical students. The medical

textbooks searched in this study were used in identifying these topics.

A list showing these cardiovascular topics and mechanisms was

created and used in guiding the search of the eMedicine website.

Advanced topics and those required at the postgraduate level were not

included. To ensure that all evaluators were criticizing the same

content, PDF copies for each article (n

ϭ 48) were printed out from

the eMedicine (Medscape) website on that day.



Evaluation tool. To ensure consistency among evaluators, appraisal

forms were constructed for this purpose. The forms used in evaluation

were similar to those discussed for medical textbooks. Due to the

continuous changes and updating/editing of eMedicine articles, the

evaluators were informed to use only the material given to them and

not to consult articles on the website.



Piloting the evaluation. Before the scoring system was applied to

the eMedicine topics, the study was piloted. A total of 10 topics (other

than those included in the study) were randomly selected and used for

this purpose. The assessors applied the scoring system independently.

None of the assessors discussed their findings or the outcomes of their

work. An Excel sheet was then produced, summarizing the three

assessor’s work, and the findings were discussed in a meeting. In this

discussion, reasons for inconsistencies were identified and discussed.

This process helped in improving the form as well as training the

assessors on how to critically evaluate each article. The three asses-

sors independently applied the scoring system for another 10 articles.

The number of medical diagrams used in these topics to explain

mechanisms were also identified and counted. Thus, contents of

mechanisms were examined for content congruent with current needs

in integrated undergraduate medical curricula.

Assessing the articles. The three assessors then evaluated the topics

from eMedicine (Medscape) independently. Topics that were difficult

to evaluate and/or when there were disagreements among assessors

were discussed in a meeting. Consistency among the three assessors

was measured using Cohen’s

␬ interrater correlation (21, 43).



YouTube Videos on Cardiovascular Mechanisms

Selection of videos. From October 1 to October 15, 2013, the

YouTube website (www.youtube.com) was searched using the fol-

lowing key words: “cardiovascular mechanisms,” “cardiovascular

pathogenesis,” “concept map cardiovascular,” “physiology mecha-

nisms,” “heart diseases mechanisms,” “heart diseases pathogenesis,”

and “concept maps heart diseases.” In the YouTube search, quotation

marks were used with these terms to specify that these terms must be

present. Only videos in the English language were identified, and the

related URL was recorded. The three assessors independently using

the search key words conducted the search, and the search results were

evaluated and used to compile a common pool that was used in further

analysis. The inclusion criteria were videos covering mechanisms or

pathogenesis of the cardiovascular diseases in adults. Videos were

excluded if they were 1) not in the English language, 2) an advertise-

ment or news, 3) discussing signs or symptoms of diseases affecting

the cardiovascular system, 4) about patients with cardiovascular

diseases reflecting on their experiences or roles, 5) a lecture on

a cardiovascular disease, 6) about drugs used in the treatment of cardio-

vascular diseases, or 7) about a clinical examination of the cardiovas-

cular system. Duplicated videos were excluded, and repeats were

treated as a single file for analysis. The repeat file with the greatest

number of hits was used for the analysis. For each video, the

following data were collected: title, duration of the video, number of

days on YouTube, total number of viewers, and name of the uploader/

creator (organization, group of people, one person). Because the

number of days on YouTube varied widely among videos, it was

Staying Current

125


LEARNING RESOURCES AND MECHANISMS

Advances in Physiology Education

doi:10.1152/advan.00149.2013



http://advan.physiology.org

 by 10.220.33.2 on February 5, 2017

http://advan.physiology.org/

Downloaded from 


decided to calculate viewership per day as a more accurate parameter

compared with total number of viewers. The viewership per day is the

ratio of number of viewers to the number of days a video is on

YouTube. The number of days was calculated from the day of

uploading on YouTube up to October 7, 2013. This calculation of

viewership per day was conducted for each video.



Evaluation tool. The criteria used for the evaluation of videos have

been described in detail in an earlier work (4, 6) with some modifi-

cation to suit this study. In summary, the design of the criteria was

based on four main domains: video content, technical aspects, author-

ity/creator, and pedagogy used. The items in the criteria were grouped

under two categories: major and minor. Major criteria comprised the

following: 1) the video uses vibrant animations or a flow diagram to

demonstrate the mechanism, 2) the contents about the mechanism are

scientifically correct, 3) the images are clear, 4) the topic is clearly

presented and is engaging, and 5) sounds are clear and the background

is free from noise. Minor criteria comprised the following: 1) the

video covers the topic identified in the title, 2) the video is designed

at the level of undergraduate medical students, 3) the time to down-

load is reasonable (

ϳ5–10 min at the maximum, not uninterrupted, or

there was no challenge to download as reported by the three evalua-

tors), 4) the educational objectives are stated, and 5) the creator/or the

organization providing the video is mentioned. These criteria were

used to categorize videos into educationally useful and noneducation-

ally useful videos. “Educationally useful” means that the video pro-

vides scientifically correct and up-to-date knowledge and its contents

are accepted by educators in other teaching institutes and match with

current information in the literature. As per the basis of the evaluation

criteria, educationally useful videos should fulfill the four domains:

scientific content, technical aspects, authority/creator, and pedagogy

used. Two scores were allocated for each item in major criteria, and

one score was allocated to each item under minor criteria. If an item

was fulfilled, an allocated score was given; if an item was not fulfilled,

a zero was given. No half scores were used. As per our previous

research work, educationally useful videos should fulfill all major

criteria items as the minimum requirements plus at least three items

from minor criteria (4, 6).



Piloting the evaluation. Before the tool was applied, the criteria

were piloted. A total of 20 videos (other than those identified) were

randomly selected and used for this purpose. The criteria were applied

independently by the three assessors. None of the assessors shared

their findings or discussed the outcome of their evaluation. An Excel

sheet covering the results from the three evaluations was then dis-

cussed in a meeting. Agreement among the assessors was

Ͼ95%. The

findings were discussed among the researchers. The criteria items

were tested again independently by the three assessors using another

20 videos. The videos were then rated independently by the three

assessors. If videos were difficult to classify or when there was a

disagreement that arose among assessors, evaluators reviewed such

videos in a meeting and reached a final agreement.



Assessing the videos. The three evaluators independently evaluated

the videos covering the cardiovascular mechanisms. Only 29 videos

fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The data were entered using Microsoft

Excel 2010 (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) and were checked before any

analysis was conducted. Agreement between the evaluators was cal-

culated using Cohen’s

␬ interrater correlation (21, 43).

Statistical Analysis

Analysis was conducted using SPSS software (version 18.0 for

Microsoft Windows, SPSS, Chicago, IL), and results were reported as

means, SDs, percentages, and minimums and maximums. t-Tests and

ANOVA were conducted to determine significant differences (32, 40).

To assess the degree to which different raters agreed in their assess-

ment decisions, Cohen’s

␬ for interrater reliability was used to assess

interrater reliability (21, 43).

RESULTS

Medical Textbooks

The search ended with the identification of seven text-

books on human physiology, four textbooks on pathology,

and six textbooks on internal medicine commonly used in

teaching in undergraduate medical courses (Table 1). The 17

textbooks met the search criteria and were obtained for

further assessment. The number of chapters on cardiovas-

cular diseases/system and blood vessels in the 17 textbooks

was 65. The percentage of cardiovascular mechanism con-

tent in physiology textbooks ranged from 5.4% [4 of 74,

Preston and Wilson (31)] to 28% [14 of 50, Mulroney and

Myers (29)], in pathology textbooks from 7.6% [4.5 of 59,

Underwood and Cross (38)] to 24.0% [24.5 of 102, Rubin et

al. (34)], and in internal medicine from 0.9% [1.5 of 152,

McPhee et al. (28)] to 10.1% [29 of 285, Longo et al. (27);

Table 1]. The overall average for cardiovascular mecha-

nisms was 16.1% (99.5 of 618) in the seven textbooks on

physiology, 17.5% (64 of 364) in the four textbooks on

pathology, and only 6.9% (79.7 of 1,150) in the six text-

books on internal medicine. The percentage of figures com-

mitted to explain cardiovascular mechanisms in the physi-

ology textbooks ranged from 7.2% [7 of 97, Preston and

Wilson (31)] to 30% [9 of 30, Mulroney and Myers (29)]. In

the pathology textbooks, the percentage of figures commit-

ted to cardiovascular mechanisms ranged from 5.2% [3 of

57, Underwood and Cross (38)] to 24% [12 of 50, Rubin and

Reisner (33)]. In the internal medicine textbooks, the per-

centage of figures committed to cardiovascular mechanisms

ranged from 0.0% [0 of 3, McPhee et al. (28)] to 9.7% [17

of 179, Longo et al. (27)].

All internal medicine textbooks except Longo et al. (27)

contained little information about cardiovascular mecha-

nisms. For example, the textbook by McPhee et al. (28)

focused mainly on clinical findings such as symptoms,

clinical signs, investigations, differential diagnosis, treat-

ment, and prognosis. Although the etiology of diseases was

provided, no pathophysiology or mechanisms were given.

Furthermore, no flow diagrams outlining mechanisms or the

pathogenesis of diseases were given. The textbook by An-

dereoli et al. (3) is a good textbook for undergraduate

medical students, but mechanisms were limited to certain

diseases. No flow diagrams outlining mechanisms or the

pathogenesis of diseases were given. The textbook by Longo

et al. (27) scored highest (10.1%) in relation to the percent-

age of cardiovascular mechanisms. However, more attention

to pathophysiology and mechanisms should be considered in

future editions. The three textbooks by Colledge et al. (13),

Kumar and Clark (23), and Goldman and Ausiello (18)

provided cardiovascular mechanisms at relatively reason-

able percentages: 8.3%, 7.1%, and 7.0, respectively. Apart

from the textbooks by Mulroney and Myers (29), Sherwood

(35), Rubin and Reisner (33), and Widmaier et al. (42), none

of the remaining textbooks used flow diagrams to outline

mechanisms and explain the pathogenesis/pathophysiology

of cardiovascular diseases. These textbooks also limited the

mechanisms at physiological or pathological aspects with no

links to clinical symptoms, signs, or investigation results.

Staying Current

126

LEARNING RESOURCES AND MECHANISMS



Advances in Physiology Education

doi:10.1152/advan.00149.2013



http://advan.physiology.org

 by 10.220.33.2 on February 5, 2017

http://advan.physiology.org/

Downloaded from 


Table

1.

Summary



of

cardiovascular

mechanisms

in

medical

textbooks

Authors


Reference

Discipline

Chapter

Pages


on

Mechanisms

Total

Pages


Percentage

of

Mechanisms



Figures

and


Tables

on

Mechanisms



Total

Figures


and

Tables


Percentage

of

Mechanism



Content

Clarity


Quality

Adequacy


Comments

Widmaier


et

al.


42

Physiology

Cardiovascular

physiology

19

81

23.4



21

figures


and

0

tables



79

figures


and

15

tables



26.5

and


0

3

2



2

Key


mechanisms

are


provided

with


several

flow


diagrams.

However,


mechanisms

are


not

integrated

with

pathology



and

clinical


aspects.

Sherwood


35

Physiology

Cardiac

physiology



23

86

26.7



16

figures


and

2

tables



70

figures


and9

tables


22.8

and


22.2

3

3



2

Excellent

resource

for


physiological

mechanisms.

However,

mechanisms

are

not


integrated

with


pathological

and


clinical

aspects.


Barrett

et

al.



8

Physiology

Cardiovascular

physiology

(2

chapters)



8.5

95

8.9



14

figures


and

0

tables



93

figures


and

27

tables



15.0

and


0

1

1



1

Less


focus

has


been

given


to

mechanisms.

Mulroney

and


Myers

29

Physiology



Cardiovascular

physiology

(2

chapters)



14

50

28



9

figures


and

0

tables



30

figures


and

0

tables



30

and


0

3

3



2

Excellent

resource

for


mechanisms,

but


there

are


no

integration

with

pathological



and

clinical


aspects.

Costanzo


15

Physiology

Cardiovascular

physiology

10

51

19.6



4

figures


and

2

tables



21

figures


and

6

tables



19.0

and


33.3

3

2



2

Despite


the

small


size

of

the



book,

mechanisms

were

covered


and

flow


diagrams

were


used.

Preston


and

Wilson


31

Physiology

Cardiovascular

system


(5

chapters)

4

74

5.4



7

figures


and

0

tables



97

figures


and

0

tables



7.2

and


0

1

1



1

Mechanisms

were

not


adequately

discussed.

Born

and


Boulpaep

10

Physiology



Cardiovascular

system


21

181


11.6

12

figures



and

4

tables



120

figures


and

34

tables



10

and


11.7

2

2



2

One


of

the


chapters

was


committed

to

mechanisms.



Rubin

and


Reisner

33

Pathology



Blood

vessels


and

the


heart(2

chapters)

16.5

122


13.5

12

figures



and

2

tables



50

figures


and

10

tables



24

and


20

2

2



2

A

well-illustrated



resource

for


learning

pathology.

However,

mechanisms

need

to

be



strengthened.

Rubin


et

al.


34

Pathology

Blood

vessels


and

the


heart

(2

chapters)



24.5

102


24.0

20

figures



and

4

tables



101

figures


and

17

tables



19.8

and


23.5

2

2



2

A

well-illustrated



resource

on

pathology.



However,

mechanisms

need

to

be



strengthened.

Underwood

and

Cross


38

Pathology

Cardiovascular

system


(2

chapters)

4.5

59

7.6



3

figures


and

0

tables



57

figures


and

8

tables



5.2

and


0

1

1



1

The


focus

is

on



clinic-

pathological

features.

Pathogenesis

and

mechanisms



are

briefly


discussed.

Kumar


et

al.


24

Pathology

Blood

vessels


and

the


heart

(2

chapters)



18.5

81

22.8



10

figures


and

2

tables



69

figures


and

11

tables



14.4

and


18.1

2

2



2

A

well-illustrated



and

comprehensive

textbook.

The


pathogenesis

of

diseases



is

clearly


provided,

but


this

varied


from

disease


to

disease.


Flow

diagrams


are

needed.


Continued

Staying Current

127

LEARNING RESOURCES AND MECHANISMS



Advances in Physiology Education

doi:10.1152/advan.00149.2013



http://advan.physiology.org

 by 10.220.33.2 on February 5, 2017

http://advan.physiology.org/

Downloaded from 


Table

1.—


Continued

Authors


Reference

Discipline

Chapter

Pages


on

Mechanisms

Total

Pages


Percentage

of

Mechanisms



Figures

and


Tables

on

Mechanisms



Total

Figures


and

Tables


Percentage

of

Mechanism



Content

Clarity


Quality

Adequacy


Comments

Kumar


and

Clark


13

Medicine


Cardiovascular

disease


9.25

130


7.1

10

figures



and

2

tables



129

figures


and

49

tables



7.7

and


4.0

3

2



2

Mechanisms

for

arrhythmias,



heart

failure,


valvular

heart


diseases,

and


systemic

hypertension

are

briefly


given.

McPhee


et

al.


28

Medicine


Heart

disease,


systemic

hypertension,

and

blood


vessels

and


lymphatic

disorders

(3

chapters)



1.5

152


0.9

0

figures



and

0

tables



3

figures


and

27

tables



0

and


0

1

1



1

Although


etiology

is

provided,



no

pathophysiology

or

mechanisms



are

given.


Colledge

et

al.



23

Medicine


Cardiovascular

disease


10

120


8.3

4

figures



and

0

tables



105

figures


and

130


tables

3.8


and

0

2



2

1

A



good

textbook


for

undergraduate

students.

However,


mechanisms

are


limited

to

a



few

diseases.

Longo

et

al.



27

Medicine


Disorders

of

the



cardiovascular

system


(27

chapters)

29

285


10.1

17

figures



and

3

tables



179

figures


and

86

tables



9.4

and


3.4

3

3



2

An

excellent



resource

for


clinical

medicine.

However,

mechanisms

are

limited


to

certain


diseases.

Andreoli


et

al.


3

Medicine


Cardiovascular

disease


(11

chapters)

9

166


5.4

2

figures



and

1

table



79

figures


and

60

tables



2.5

and


1.6

1

1



1

An

excellent



resource

for


clinical

medicine.

However,

mechanisms

are

limited


to

certain


diseases.

Goldman


and

Ausiello


18

Medicine


Cardiovascular

disease


21

297


7.0

9

figures



and

2

tables



195

figures


and

124


tables

4.6


and

1.6


2

2

1



Mechanisms

were


clearly

outlined


for

a

number



of

diseases


but

were


brief.

No

flow



diagrams

used.


Staying Current

128


LEARNING RESOURCES AND MECHANISMS

Advances in Physiology Education

doi:10.1152/advan.00149.2013



http://advan.physiology.org

 by 10.220.33.2 on February 5, 2017

http://advan.physiology.org/

Downloaded from 


eMedicine Topics

A total of 48 topics from eMedicine (Medscape) on cardio-

vascular diseases were identified and evaluated for mecha-

nisms (Table 2). The percentage of cardiovascular mechanism

content varied from 0% in several topics, such as alcoholic

cardiomyopathy, acute coronary syndrome, and hypertensive

heart disease, to 41.6% (2.5 of 6) for the topic on renovascular

hypertension. The overall average for the cardiovascular mech-

anisms in the 48 topics was 15.8% (46.2 of 292). Cardiovas-

cular mechanisms were adequately outlined in 22.9% (11 of

48) topics, for example, atrioventricular dissociation, paroxys-

mal supraventricular tachycardia, premature ventricular con-

traction, cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, cardiogenic shock,

dilated cardiomyopathy, coronary artery atherosclerosis, heart

failure, long QT syndrome, pulmonary edema, and infective

endocarditis. In the majority of these diseases, no flow dia-

grams outlining the mechanisms at the body system, organ,

cellular, and molecular levels were provided. Table 2 summa-

rizes examples of the limitations/deficiencies observed in some

of the mechanisms given.



YouTube Videos

A total of 1,150 YouTube videos were found on the initial

search and on applying the inclusion criteria and visual exam-

ination of the videos; only 29 videos were found relevant to

cardiovascular mechanisms (Table 3). The total duration of

these video clips was 414 min and 14 s. The application of the

criteria by the three evaluators independently revealed that

there were 16 educationally useful videos, scoring 14.1

Ϯ 0.5

(mean


Ϯ SD), and the remaining 13 videos were not educa-

tionally useful, scoring 6.1

Ϯ 1.72. The difference between the

two groups was significant (P

Ͻ 0.001).

The total duration of useful videos was 340 min and 07 s.

The total number of viewers of all videos was 274,077. The

useful videos attracted 209,597 (76.4%) of all viewers. Table 3

summarizes key information about the 29 videos included in

the study.

Except for two videos produced by a pharmaceutical com-

pany for educational purposes, all other educationally useful

videos were created by physicians and professional bodies/

institutions and were linked to organizations such as East

Carolina University, Harvard Medical School, and Brigham

and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. The videos

addressed mechanisms of several cardiovascular diseases, in-

cluding mechanisms and the pathogenesis of systolic and

diastolic heart failure, coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis,

hypertensive nephropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, and pulmonary

arterial hypertension.

The majority of noneducationally useful videos failed two of

the major criteria items (23%, 3 of 13), three items from the

major criteria (30.7%, 4 of 13), and four or more items from

the major criteria (46.1, 6 of 13). Minor criteria items were also

not fulfilled in these videos, ranging from one to three items

not fulfilled. In other words, these videos failed to provide clear

animations or flow diagrams to demonstrate the mechanism,

the topic was not clearly presented and was not engaging, and

sounds were not clear and there was noise in the background.

These videos also failed to address one or two items from the

minor criteria items.



Agreement Between Assessors

Agreement between the three assessors was calculated using

Cohen’s

␬ interrater correlation. The score was in the range of



0.55– 0.95 for cardiovascular mechanisms in textbooks and

Medscape. The overall score was in the range of 0.78 – 0.96.




Yüklə 89,82 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə