Sutherland Group sutherland austplants com au Notes on Propagation by Seeds and Cuttings



Yüklə 109,38 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü109,38 Kb.

Notes on Propagation by Seeds and Cuttings (APS Sutherland Group) 

 

1



 

Sutherland Group 

sutherland.austplants.com.au

 

 

Notes on Propagation by Seeds and Cuttings 

 

These notes were written by Ron Stevens of the Society for Growing Australian Plants 



(Sutherland Group) in July 1978. They have been retyped in May 2012. Some species listed 

may not be commonly available now or may have had a name change.  

 

 

Part 1 – Seeds 



 

The ripened seed has its water content almost to a minimum resulting in the suspension of its 

activities. In this condition, it is able to withstand extremes of temperature which would be fatal 

after it had taken up water. How long seeds retain their power of germination is not known with 

certainty. Seeds can absorb moisture even from the air, so it is essential that they should be 

kept under the driest conditions when stored. Seeds which have been kept in the dark and out 

of contact with the atmosphere will germinate at an age impossible with seeds exposed to light 

and air. Generally speaking, the longer seeds are kept, the lower will be the percentage of 

germination, and less the vigour of the seedlings. 

 

Seed collection 

Ripened seeds are in three groups: 

 

Group 1 – Seeds that remain on plants 

Banksia, Callistemon, Calothamnus, Hakea, Leptospermum, Melaleuca, and Regelia 

(exceptions are Banksia integrifoliaCallistemon viminalis, and Callistemon acuminatus). 

 

When collecting seed pods that remain on the plant, always collect the lowest pods on the plant. 



Place the pods in a paper bag in a sunny position. The pods will open and the seeds fall into the 

bag. Banksia cones are best held over a naked flame or placed in a hot oven. The heat will 

cause the cone to open and the seeds can be collected. 

 

Group 2 – Seeds expelled from the plant 

Most of the native plants are in this group, so you must keep these plants under observation 

when they set seeds. Pods may be green today and ready to open tomorrow. 

 

Group 3 – Seeds that fall from the plant 

Christmas Bush and Persoonia. 

Collect seeds from these plants as soon as they change colour. 

 

 



Collection 

 

Always ensure that seeds are ripe when collecting them. Often with seeds that are expelled 



from the plant, although they may develop seed containers these may contain no seed or only a 

few develop. Quite often they are subject to insect attacks and in some cases all the seed may 

be destroyed. Gompholobiums are phone to such attacks. 

 


Notes on Propagation by Seeds and Cuttings (APS Sutherland Group) 

 

2



Germination 

Before germination can take place, seed requires moisture, air and warmth. It is necessary for 

the moisture to pass through the seed coat before germination can begin. 

 

When the seed coast is thin and soft, germination occurs readily but moisture cannot penetrate 



seeds that have a hard outer shell. Under natural conditions, these seeds remain dormant until 

the hard shell is damaged by decay, abrasion or fire. 

 

So some seeds require treatment before sowing and they fall into three groups. 



 

Group 1 – Seeds requiring soaking overnight, abrasion, rubbing between 2 sheets of 

coarse sandpaper or nicking the outer cover with sharp knife or razor blade 

Among these are Acacia, Bossiaea, Brachysema, Burtonia, Cassia, Chorizema, Clianthus, 

Darwinia, Davesi, Dillwynia, Gompholobium, Goodia, Gossypium, Hardenbergia, Hibiscus, 

Hovea, Indigofera, Jacksonia, Kennedia, Mirbelia, Oxylobium, Pavonia, Platylobium, Pultanea, 

Swainsonia, Templetonia, Viminaria, Anigozanthos (bicolour, rufa and pulcherrima). 

 

Group 2 – Seeds requiring cover with dry leaves, setting alight and keeping alight for 5-



10 mins 

If possible, use soil from the area where growing for sowing. Group 2 seeds are frequently 

infertile and germination may be poor. Burning may destroy some of the seeds but will crack the 

hard shell of others and allow moisture to enter and the seed to germinate. 

 

Such seeds include: some of the Boronias, Correa, Crowea, Eriostemon, Leucopogon, 



Persoonia, Phebalium, Philotheca, Ricinocarpus, Styphelia, and Zieria. 

 

Group 3 – Seeds taking up to 12 months (but sometimes only 4-6 weeks) 

All of these seeds need abrasive treatment before sowing, except Eremophila which should 

have the fleshy or bulbous outer layer removed and the woody case rubbed between two 

sheets of coarse sand paper.  

 

They are Conospermum, Darwinia, Eremophila, Isopogon, Micromyrtus, Myoporum, Petrophile, 



Pileanthus and Thryptomene. 

 

Finally, some of the seeds that do not require treatment before sowing:  



Actinotus, Anigozanthos (manglesii, flavida, humilis, viridis), Baeckea, Beaufortia, Brown 

Boronia, Callistemon, Calothamnus, Christmas Bush, Conostylis, Everlastings, Epacris, 

Eucalyptus, Hypocalmna, Isotoma, Kunzea, Leptospermum, Lobelia, Melaleuca, Melastoma, 

Regelia, Sprengelia, Stylidium, Wahlenbergia, Woolsia. 

 

 

Time 



 

In the Sydney region, I find the best time to sow seeds for quick germination is September and 

October, or March and April, with Waratahs in August, Anigozanthos in September, Christmas 

Bush and Actinotus in January, Everlastings and Hypocalymna in March, Brown Boronia in 

September. 


Notes on Propagation by Seeds and Cuttings (APS Sutherland Group) 

 

3



Part 2 – Cuttings 

 

Next to seeds, cuttings provide the best method of propagating large numbers of plants. They 



are of special value in perpetuating strains or varieties of plants that cannot be relied upon to 

come true from seed. 

 

Stem cuttings are generally used and may be taken as: 



Softwood – new growth 

Medium wood – new shoots 6-8 weeks old 

Hard wood – 18 months or older 

Heel cuttings – sideshoots with a heel left on them. 

 

Cuttings should only be taken from healthy plants, never from diseased or starved plants. Some 



people believe only non-flowering shoots should be used for cuttings, but with many species 

better regeneration takes place when cuttings are taken just prior to or just after flowering. This 

is the period when the sap is flowing freely within the plant and the best time to take cuttings. 

They can of course be taken at any time of the year but will take longer to form roots. 

 

With plants that are easily rooted from cuttings, age of the plant makes no difference. But age in 



the more difficult subjects can be an important factor, with these cuttings taken from young 

plants will root more easily than those from older plants. 

 

The type of material used to make cuttings varies from plant to plant. Some are propagated 



from young tips, others from old shoot. Experimenting answers this. 

 

Growth 

All plant growth is controlled by growth substances, some of which have the function of 

controlling and stimulating root formation. A number of synthetic substances have been found 

capable of stimulating root formation and now commercial preparations containing various 

combinations of these synthetics and agitators are on sale: Seradix with powers for soft, 

medium and hard woods, also Lanes All Purpose Hormone Cutting Powder. 

 

In the past, it was thought that only heel cuttings or cuttings taken at a node with a clean cut just 



below the node and planted immediately were successful.  

 

However, with the hormone rooting powders, even internodal cuttings can be successful. Some 



people do not believe in the use of cutting powders and certainly cuttings will root without it, but 

chances of success are greater by using them. 

 

Plants are extremely variable in their ability to form adventitious root systems. In some, it is 



virtually impossible to induce them to do so, while in others it is no problem. 

 

The ability of a plant part to make a successful cutting depends upon the ability of cells within it 



to change their function – divide and produce new cells, which in turn will form new organs 

which are capable of forming adventitious or abnormal roots. This operation comes from the 

cells of the cambium layer. 

 

When a cutting is taken from a plant, the active cells form a protective tissue or callus at its 



base, which is the forerunner to roots. Inside the cuttings there is food stored and soil waters on 

which the cells live; obviously the time this will last is limited. It also has to combat transpiration 

so it is essential to get it into the propagation medium as soon as possible. 

 

Unless the cutting is able by the formation of new roots to obtain fresh supplies of soil water and 



so become self-supporting, starvation sets in. So the maintenance of adequate water supply to 

the tissues of a cutting while it is forming new roots is of the utmost importance. 

 


Notes on Propagation by Seeds and Cuttings (APS Sutherland Group) 

 

4



Also the water supply to the leaves from the roots has been cut off, and the cuttings can lose 

water by transpiration. To avoid the cuttings drying up and dying before rooting, two measures 

are taken. Firstly, reduce the number of leaves to a minimum, leaving only the young ones. This 

ensures adequate production and translocation of food and growth substance and also reduces 

the leaf area from which water may be lost. 

 

The second measure involves maintaining a high humidity around the aerial parts of the cuttings 



by various propagation methods such as cold frames, hot boxes etc. 

 

Propagating soils and mixtures are many and varied. I use coarse washed sand for most 



species and if possible soil from the area for waratahs, Boronia serrulata and Crowea saligna

leaving it unwashed. Another good mixture is coarse sand and bush soil mixed 50/50, which is 

good for Crowea exalata and some of the grevilleas. 

 

Time for cuttings 

Cuttings can be planted any time of the year but below are my observations of the best time of 

the year. 

 

January 


Callistemon ‘Captain Cook’ 

Epacris longiflora (planted under bottle) 

Leschenaultia all species 

Waratah (use soil from around plant itself) 

 

February  



Callistemon ‘Captain Cook’ 

Grevillea lavandulacea 

 

March 



Boronia crenulata 

Boronia denticulata 

Boronia heterophylla 

Correa reflexa 

Correa manni 

Correa Mann’s hybrid 

Crowea exalata 

Darwinia rhadinophylla 

Grevillea asplenifolia 

Grevillea lavandulacea 

Grevillea juniperina prostrate 

Grevillea longifolia 

Grevillea ‘Robyn Gordon’ 

Grevillea thelmanniana  

Leschenaultia various 

Pimelea decussata 

Prostanthera 

Scaevola 

 

April 



Boronia anemonifolia 

Boronia chandleri 

Boronia cymosa 

Boronia crenulata 

Boronia deani 

Boronia denticulata 

Boronia filifolia 

Boronia frascri 

Boronia heterophylla 

Boronia lutea 

Boronia megastigma 

Boronia mollis 

Notes on Propagation by Seeds and Cuttings (APS Sutherland Group) 

 

5



Boronia polygalifolia 

Calytrix tetragona 

Correa all species 

Darwinia citriodora 

Eremophylla maculata 

Eutaxia obovata 

Grevillea alpina 

Grevillea Golden Alpine 

Grevillea punicea 

Grevillea rankinsi 

Hypocalymna angustifolia 

Melaleuca incana 

Melaleuca pulchella  

Thryptomene saxicola 

 

May 



Correa all species 

Epacris longifolia (in situ under bottle) 

Eremophila 

Leschenaultia all species 

 

June 



Beaufortia purpurea 

Boronia crenulata 

Boronia cymosa 

Boronia heterophylla 

Calytrix tetragona 

Correa all species 

Crowea saligna 

Darwinia citriodora 

Darwinia collina 

Eremophila 

Eutaxia obovata 

Grevillea biternata 

Grevillea lanigera 

Grevillea juniperina rubra 

Grevillea thelmanniana  

Hypocalymna angustifolia 

Kunzea calida 

Kunzea ericifolia 

Kunzea preissiana 

Kunzea WA species 

Leschenaultia biloba 

Melaleuca thymifolia 

Melaleuca platycalyx 

Pimelea decussata 

Prostanthera 

Thryptomene saxicola 

Verticordia densifolia 

Verticordia plumosa 

 

July 



Nil 

August and 

September 

Bauera rubioides 

Boronia filifolia 

Boronia crenulata 

Boronia cymosa 

Boronia serrulata (own soil) 

Beaufortia purpurea 

Calytrix sullivani 


Notes on Propagation by Seeds and Cuttings (APS Sutherland Group) 

 

6



Calytrix tetragona 

Chorizema 

Crowea saligna 

Eremophila maculata 

Eutaxia obovata 

Grevillea baueri 

Grevillea lutea 

Grevillea punicea 

Grevillea Crosbie Morrison 

Grevillea Poorinda Queen 

Grevillea Golden Alpina 

Hypocalymna angustifolia 

Hypocalymna robustum 

Melaleuca incana 

Melaleuca megacephala 

Melaleuca platycalyx 

Melaleuca pulchella 

Prostanthera cuneata 

Prostanthera incana 

Prostanthera ovalifolia 

Prostanthera ‘Poorinda Leanne’ 

Prostanthera rosea 

Prostanthera stricta 

Prostanthera violacea 

 

October 



Correa aemula 

Correa backhousiana 

Correa bauerlennii ‘Chefs Cap’ 

Correa calycina 

Correa Cains hybrid 

Correa ‘Lakes Entrance’ 

Correa decumbens 

Correa glabra green 

Correa glabra yellow 

Correa lime yellow 

Correa manni 

Correa pulchella minor 

Correa pulchella var rubra 

Correa reflexa angelsea 

Correa turnbulli 

Waratah (own soil) 

 

November 



Hypocalymna robustum 

Leschenaultia all species 

Waratah (own soil) 

 

December 



Callistemon ‘Captain Cook’ 

Grevillea ‘Robyn Gordon’  

Waratah (own soil) 



 

 

 



Yüklə 109,38 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə