Syddansk Universitet Integration of market pull and technology push in the corporate front end and innovation management Insights from the German software industry



Yüklə 316,83 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/4
tarix04.05.2017
ölçüsü316,83 Kb.
1   2   3   4

Phase 1: Market and technology 

opportunities

Phase 2: Product and 

business ideas

Phase 3: Draft concept of 

product and business plan

Phase 1: Market and technology 

opportunities

Phase 2: Product and 

business ideas

Phase 3: Draft concept of 

product and business plan

P

ro



ject sele

ctio


n

P

ro



ject sele

ctio


n

Derivation of basic and 

optional technical, market 

and commercial requirements

Definition of basic and optional 

functions (technical and 

commercial)

Draft product 

concept and 

business plan

Draft product 

concept and 

business plan

Proof of technical concept 

and business plan (including 

solutions for optional 

requirements

Id

ea sel



ecti

o



Id

ea sel


ecti

o



Impulse analysis and 

hence problems 

definition (technical and 

commercial)

Collecting, generating 

and consolidating of 

product and business 

ideas


Id

ea sc


re

ening


Id

ea sc


re

ening


Elaborating of 

ideas, feasibility-

checks

Balanced 



product 

and 


business 

idea card

Idea 

de-


scrip-

tion


Idea 

de-


scrip-

tion


Description

of

analysis



of search

areas and 

opportunities 

S

ear



c

h

 are



a an

op



po

rt

u



n

it

y



 sel

ect


io

n

Feedback loop



Integration of internal and external tacit knowledge carriers (customers, suppliers, production…)

Identification of 

company potentials

Analysis of future 

needs and 

requirements

Identification and 

analysis of search 

areas

Fig. 6. Integrated front end process model (



Sandmeier et al., 2004

).

A. Brem, K.-I. Voigt / Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367



355

Author's personal copy

be a ‘face-lifting’ of current products and services so that

there is a high probability of competitive threats based on

new or improved technologies (

Bleicher, 1995

). Another

problem is the potential misinterpretation of the market or

administrative problems as requirements of new technolo-

gical solutions (

McLouglin and Harris, 1997

).

At the strategy formulation level, the deficiencies and



shortcomings become even clearer (see

Table 3


).

Despite the different approaches, the distinction between

technology-induced and market-induced is not always well-

defined. Adoption depends on the diffusion trigger as well,

because it can be induced by the vendor through aggressive

marketing and sales activities, or be motivated by problems

or deficiencies in the organizational search for solutions

(

Pennings, 1987



).

The chemical industry of the last century is a good

example for market changes without influencing certain

technologies or market needs. Until the early 1970s,

innovations had been only technology-driven. After the

oil crisis, the situation changed immediately: customer and

market orientation prevailed, and 62% of new products

were market-induced. The next change was in the late

1980s, triggered neither by technology or markets: envi-

ronment protection laws forced companies to develop

new technologies for products not needed until then,

such as chemical filters (

Quadbeck-Seeger and Bertleff,

1995


). Obviously, not all developments can be explained

monocausally through specific market demands or new

technologies. However, it can be stated that companies

which became market leaders with a certain advanced

technology ‘tended to loose’ their dominant market

position by missing the changeover to new technologies

(

Pfeiffer et al., 1997



). Still, distinctions can be made by

periods in which either demand or technology played the

most important role in corporate innovation management

(

Ende and Dolfsma, 2005



). Moreover, there is certain

proof that other key factors influence product innovation

adoption as well: for instance, the entrepreneurial attri-

butes of pro-activeness and risk-taking (

Salavou and

Lioukas, 2003

).

Thus, it is not surprising that there have not been any



convincing theories of models and mechanisms for

technology origins yet (

Geschka, 1995

). Demand side

factors and technology side factors jointly determine a

company’s research success (

Lee, 2003

), and they have to

be permanently adjusted to each other (

Freeman, 1982

).

Therefore, successful products and services rely on the



targeted combination of market pull and technology push

activities (

Hauschildt, 2004

), since the integration of push-

pull factors generally contributes to more innovativeness of

the company (

Munro and Noori, 1988

). In order to achieve

this, for instance, networking competence is identified as a

fundamental success factor (

Gemu¨nden and Ritter, 2001

).

An example of successful implementation is the creation



and use of multi-company collaborative networks, in which

knowledge can be transferred and members of the network

continuously attempt to innovate (

Chesbrough, 2003

).

Collaborations with downstream firms and universities



are particularly improving the chances of success (

Lee and


Park, 2006

).

2.2. Conceptual linkage



As already shown, there are strong interdependencies

between technology push and market pull models; no

simple black and white determinations enable or disable a

certain approach. However, particularly at the corporate

policy level, sustainable strategic procedures are required

to efficiently manage the product and process innovation

development. Therefore, a simplifying ‘overall approach’ is

inadequate; a pragmatic model is needed. For this reason, a

conceptual framework for further considerations will be

introduced.

In the relevant literature, there is a common feeling that

uncertainty is a crucial factor of management through

discontinuous chapters in technological progress and

ongoing new technology paradigms (

Dosi, 1982

;

Tushman



and Anderson, 1986

). In this context, a recently studied

case at Volvo Cars clearly showed the need for uncertainty

reduction without prematurely closing the scope of

innovation (

Bo¨rjesson et al., 2006

). Therefore,

Pearson


(1990)

proposes an innovation strategy dependant on

various kinds of uncertainty. He distinguishes uncertainty

regarding the technical approach (‘means’), the market

focus (‘ends’), and the timing (‘urgency’). So, depending on

ARTICLE IN PRESS

Table 2

Differentiation between technology push and market pull (



Gerpott, 2005

)

Description/attribute



Technology push

Market pull

Technological uncertainty

High


Low

R&D expenses

High

Low


R&D duration

Long


Short

Sales market-related uncertainty High

Low

Time-to-market



Uncertain/

unknown


Certain/known

R&D customer integration

Difficult

Easy


Kinds of market research

Qualitative-

discovering

Quantitative-

verifying

Need for change of customer

behavior

Extensive

Minimal

Table 3


Summary of deficiencies and shortcomings of technology push and market

pull (


Burgelman and Sayles, 2004

)

Technology push



Market pull

Risk of starting with what can be

researched and evaluated easily

Risk of looking only at needs that

are easily identified but with minor

potential

Risk of addressing the needs of the

atypical user

Continuing to change the

definition of the ‘opportunity’;

‘miss the opportunity’

Potential for getting locked into

one technical solution

Lack of being a ‘champion’ or

‘true believer’

A. Brem, K.-I. Voigt / Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367

356


Author's personal copy

the level of means, ends, and urgency, other kinds of

strategic choices are appropriate (see

Fig. 7


).

Burgelman and Sayles (2004)

suggest three fundamental

elements for an enduring linkage between technology push

and market pull in order to define viable new business

opportunities:

(i) Technology sources: Research only works if the

researcher’s personal interests are being adequately con-

sidered, combined with existing corporate expertise, and

supplemented with continuing the overview of new

technological developments. ‘Bootleg research’ is a way

of pursuing an idea against all organizational odds, but if

there is no applicable workflow processing afterwards, this

kind of research should be avoided.

(ii) Market demand: Marketers must do a permanent

search, especially in all areas of customer dissatisfaction.

Moreover, ongoing evaluations regarding future potential

of new need satisfaction are crucial.

(iii) Relevant problem: Relevant problems are initial

impulses from internal or external sources for innovation,

such as ideas and trends. Other sources or origins of

relevant issues are problems of the operating divisions, as

well as new opportunities created by external events.

Consequently, the managerial initiatives can be defined

in three alternative patterns:

(i) Technology-competence-driven: Scientists look for new

technologies and scientific breakthroughs with accordant

commercialization potential.

(ii) Market-need-driven: Marketing-oriented managers

steer researchers by referring to exciting and interesting

markets with foreseeable high demand.

(iii) Corporate-interest-driven: Defined and professed

‘interests’ of the top management are obligatory. Interests

are more than just strategic issues; they involve operational

subjects as well.

This is not as self-evident as it seems, because manage-

ment often postulates goals and expectations which,

afterwards, they do not support on their own. So, no

matter who seeks to be the proponent of a new idea,

ultimately, it must be encouraged by the upper manage-

ment, even if senior executives are not directly involved in

the innovation processes, but rather work behind the

scenes to ‘pull the strings’ (

Smith, 2007

). In particular, new

venture projects often fall out of the ‘normal’ corporate

strategy, so no matter where the innovative impulse comes

from, it must be accepted by the upper management.

Hence, there is an ongoing need for integrating overall

strategic and operative goals and roadmaps within the

innovation management.

The corporate-interest-driven part is the most difficult

one to implement because, in this case, innovation means

the continuous consideration of the company’s strategic

and operational goals, with successful aggregation between

the demand and potential sphere through precise internal

communication (see

Fig. 8


).

Internal communication is a critical point, insofar as the

timing of information is a crucial element of the coopera-

tion between technology and market. Therefore, typical

risks to detect innovations are based on questions

regarding the right information: what information?, when?,

how processed?, from whom?, what time horizon?, and so

on; to foster communication between the two parties, a

functional abstract procedure is necessary.

On this note, either a technological potential ‘searches’

for different needs or problems to be solved, or a specific

need or problem ‘searches’ for diverse technological

potentials (

Pfeiffer et al., 1997

).

Nevertheless, ‘innovation requires collective action



or efforts to create shared understandings from dispa-

rate perspectives’ (

Dougherty, 1992, p. 195

). Moreover,

ARTICLE IN PRESS

Urgency

Ends

Means

Issues raised and implications for strategy

Uncertainty regarding

Generate commitment – rugby team approach, give high priority and provide necessary resources.

High

Low


Low

Prioritize and enter rapidly – use joint ventures and

aquisitions, do not spread resources too widely.

High


High

Low


Requires systematic market analysis – use idea generation techniques, enter markets sequentially.

Low


High

Low


Planned and sequential testing – use alternative approaches, consider doing more background

research.

Low

Low


High

Background, exploratory research – encourage ´free´ activity and `bootlegging`, be open to 

opportunities. 

Low


High

High


Set up competitive projects – parallel technical activities, buy in technical skills, know when to stop, 

but don‘t give up too soon.

High

Low


High

Multiple approaches – spend heavily on basic and exploratory research, try not to get caught in this

area.

High


High

High


Fairly straight forward – maintaining motivation and providing resource is important.

Low


Low

Low


 

Fig. 7. Different kinds of uncertainty and their consequences on strategy (

Pearson, 1990

).

A. Brem, K.-I. Voigt / Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367



357

Author's personal copy

innovation also depends on factors such as business logic

and environmental dynamics. If there is market turbulence

combined with market-based business logic, customer and

technology linking seems to be a discriminator between low

and high innovation. Innovation under technology turbu-

lence depends on the kind of business logic used: market-

based logic requires the commitment of the employees for

success, whereas technology-based business logic requires

broad technology searching (

Tuominen et al., 2004

).

However, the transition process from technology to



market orientation and vice versa requires a change in

mindset on the part of the innovators (

Ulijn et al., 2001

).

Still, there are examples of succeeding companies (like



Matsushita) which sustainably combine market-oriented

product development capabilities with difficult-to-imitate

technological capabilities for a highly competitive market

position (

Kodama, 2007

).

Finally, the preceding advisements are summarized in



Fig. 9

.

Following



Burgelman and Sayles (2004)

, in this context,

one can conclude that initial impulses for innovation

(‘relevant problems’) are triggered by corporate interest,

technology-competence, and certain market needs. Timing

issues affect all kinds of innovation strategies, no matter

whether the companies are technology-driven (e.g., in the

case of patent expiration) or market-driven (e.g., a product

line at the end of the certain life cycle). Hence, time urgency

is added as a basic variable as well. The (mostly non-linear)

innovation process begins with idea generation, out of the

relevant problem, and ends with successful implementa-

tion, according to

Thom (1980)

. As the internal corporate

innovation process is surrounded and influenced by

external factors, which are crucial for the company’s

innovations (

Brem, 2008

;

Lind, 2002



), they are implicated

as well (

Fahey and Narayanan, 1986

):

(i) political influences (government stability, taxation



policy, social welfare, etc.),

(ii) socialcultural influences (income distribution, consu-

merism, education, etc.),

(iii) environmental influences (protection laws, waste dis-

posal, location, etc.),

ARTICLE IN PRESS



Corporate strategy

Internal

communi-

cation

Current customers

State-of-the-art technologies

„Demand sphere“

„Potential sphere“

Technology-

oriented

divisions

R&D



- Engineering

- etc.

Market-

oriented

divisions

Sales



- Marketing

- etc.

Corporate strategy

Fig. 8. Coherence between technology and market sphere (

Pfeiffer et al., 1997

).

(internal)



Technology

competence

Market need

Corporate interest

Innovation 

process

Relevant

problems

Time

Innovation

Socialcultural influences

Political influences

Economical influences

Environmental influences

Technological influences

Legal influences 

Fig. 9. Triggers and key elements of corporate innovation management.

A. Brem, K.-I. Voigt / Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367

358


Author's personal copy

(iv) economical influences (inflation, income, business

cycles, etc.),

(v) technological influences (government spending on

research, speed of technology transfer, rates of

obsolescence, etc.) and

(vi) legal influences (employment law, product safety,

business legislation, etc.).

This conceptual framework shows the most relevant

factors, but still needs to be validated and developed

further, especially in order to show how the single elements

influence the innovation process and success in detail, as

well as the kind of interferences between the elements

themselves.

3. Case study: a large German company

3.1. Methodology

The following case study is based on extensive analysis

and evaluation of secondary data (corporate documenta-

tion analysis) and interviews with managers of different

departments (R&D, Marketing, Sales, Technology, etc.)

(

Yin, 1981



). Ten qualitative, guided expert interviews were

conducted (

Witzel, 2000

). These interviews lasted between

70 and 90 min individually and over 13 h collectively, not

including time spent on transliteration. Meetings between

managers and researchers on a regular basis were

organized to validate the findings and to recognize further

issues for analysis. Moreover, corporate documentation

analysis was done to validate the information gathered.

For this, the company supplied internal meeting records,

process instructions, and strategy papers.

A single case study was selected because the researched

company can be seen as ‘an extreme or unique case’

(

Yin, 1994



). The company was chosen because of its special

market position and dependence on legislation, as well as

its unique organizational combination of technology and

market, especially with the high regulation influence by the

government. The aim of the research was to get deeper

insights into their innovation management and hence,

implications

for


the

stated


conceptual

framework

(

Eisenhardt, 1989



).

‘Interviews are a highly efficient way to gather rich,

empirical data, especially when the phenomenon of

interest is highly episodic and infrequent’ (

Eisenhardt and

Graebner, 2007, p. 28

). All interviews were semi-structured

and designed appropriately to the research question.

Further input was generated through regular expert meet-

ings with other companies as well. The language of the

questionnaire and the interviews was German.

Identifying actors in organizations is critical and some-

times methodically difficult due to the rapid change of

corporate knowledge, especially through structural shifts of

the responsible individuals (

Carlsson et al., 2002

). There-

fore, the company management was involved to identify

appropriate interview partners. Following the ‘snowball

method’ (

Carlsson et al., 2002

), more interview partners

could be found to make sure that there was no pre-selection

bias. Moreover, the participants were from different

hierarchical levels, functional areas, and company loca-

tions (


Eisenhardt and Graebner, 2007

).

Generally, our interview guideline consisted of two



general parts. In the first one, socio-demographic questions

were included (e.g., information about the interviewed

person such as degrees, job description, prior positions,

etc.). The second section is about the specific innovation

management in the company, divided into a personal and a

corporate level. On the personal level, the interviewees were

asked about their definition of innovation, about their own

innovative activities, etc. On the corporate level, they were

questioned about the way they see idea and innovation

management accomplished in the company (e.g., ‘How are

new products generated in your company? Which ways are

they going? Do you have examples?’ or ‘Which incentives

do you have and do you wish to have for fostering idea

generation and implementation?’). The interview guideline,

in its entirety, can be provided upon request.

3.2. Researched case

3.2.1. Background

Persistent innovation and fast change are the best

attributes of the software industry, and not just because

of its dependence on the computer industry. To retain the

status quo (regarding systems, computers, components,

etc.), continuous endeavors are compulsory (

Rubenstein,

1989


). Therefore, a software development and information

technology service provider needs to be up-to-date on all

counts. On one hand, it has to offer software and services

that enable the customer to make use of the technological

status quo. On the other hand, it has to integrate

functionality and support which is the only outcome of

the customer’s needs, independent of the current state-of-

the-art technology. That is why innovation management

causes many difficulties, especially in service environments

(

McDermott et al., 2001



).

3.2.2. General company information

The researched company was founded in Germany in the

1960s. Customers are tax accountants, attorneys, public

accountants, and chartered accountants, as well as their

associated companies. Still, these customers can sell the

products and services to their end-customer as well.

The product portfolio includes software (e.g., for

accounting, audit, personnel management, etc.), services

(e.g., IT-support, print and dispatch-service, etc.) and

consulting (on education, training, management consult-

ing, etc.), offered all over Europe. In 2005, the company

employed more than 5.390 people, with annual sales of

approximately 581 million Euros. The current market

share in Germany is approximately 60–80%.

The company is technology-driven, mainly because of

its origin in programming and coding-specific software

ARTICLE IN PRESS

A. Brem, K.-I. Voigt / Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367

359

1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə