Syddansk Universitet Integration of market pull and technology push in the corporate front end and innovation management Insights from the German software industry



Yüklə 316,83 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/4
tarix04.05.2017
ölçüsü316,83 Kb.
1   2   3   4

Author's personal copy

solutions, as well as offering the corresponding service

solutions. Owing to its permanent growth for almost 40

years, organizational structures have not always kept up

with the changing business and management requirements.

Still, in the last years, the awareness has grown to make

changes within the formal internal organization. The

perception of innovation management has also changed

to a more market-oriented one, in no small part because of

ongoing and increasing customer expectations and rapidly

changing market conditions.

3.3. Findings: case-specific characteristics

3.3.1. Corporate innovation management

In general, the company differs between a ‘trend’ and an

‘idea’: A trend identifies ‘something new’ and distinguishes

it from ‘something existing;’ an idea is a proposal for an

action, which either reacts to recent developments or

proactively utilizes them. Based on those assumptions, the

management has defined a corporate innovation manage-

ment process (see

Fig. 10

).

The main steps from idea generation to idea implemen-



tation are comparable to the stages shown by

Thom (1980)

.

The size of the company requires a division into



decentralized and centralized activities. The awareness of

different needs in particular phases can be seen in the

intuition and logic spotlight at the beginning, as well as in

the efficiency and output orientation at the end of the

process. The management control board consists of top

management representatives from all different divisions.

A main focus lies on the permanent controlling of the

whole innovation process by means of operating and

financial figures.

3.3.2. Former status of technology and marketing

The basic approach is to bring technology and market-

oriented knowledge together. The company already has

existing departments which deal with these issues. The

department of strategic technology monitoring has been

positioned as a competence center, focusing on recent

developments in all adequate and interesting technology

fields for almost 30 years.

On one hand, this department is supposed to look for

technological improvements for existing products and

services; on the other hand, it is expected that the staff

will discover technologies for potential new products.

There are certain responsibilities the employees possess

collectively (e.g., for particular products or product

groups), but in general, they are free to spend their time

on their individual area of responsibility. For instance, they

can participate in fairs, exhibitions and thematically fitting

conferences, or read newspapers and journals. Team events

and meetings also take place on a regular basis to ensure

inter-department knowledge exchange. Before that, depart-

ments did not directly interact with each other, unless one

person addressed another. However, the exchange with

other departments of the company had not been intro-

duced yet.

The main task of the strategic product management

department is to take care of the corporate product

portfolios in a centrally organized way. The general

coordination of marketing and sales activities illustrates

another duty: supporting the specific product managers

in the other departments. These employees are supposed

to conduct market research for existing products, as

well as search for new and promising markets. Inherently,

they have a sophisticated understanding of customers

and markets. Several instruments present the back-

ground for this, e.g. the product service integration,

which provides customer feedback and improvements

for all existing products and services. However, the

exchange with other departments of the company was

still poor.

The environment observation is a cross-departmental

function, especially between technology and marketing.

The target is to gain information about recent develop-

ments in various dimensions (e.g., jurisprudence, competi-

tors, the economy, etc.).

ARTICLE IN PRESS

Exploration phase

Regulated market entry

Transition

period


Half time

Management

controll board

rating


unsystematic

systematic

Efficiency and

output orientation

Intuition, analytics

logic

Idea generation

Idea acceptance

Idea implementation

(

)



l

a

r

t

n

e

c

(

)

l

a

c

o

l

(local)

Defined


end point

Controlling

Fuzzy

front-end



Fig. 10. Overview of the corporate innovation management process, end point, and management control board rating.

A. Brem, K.-I. Voigt / Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367

360


Author's personal copy

3.4. Findings: case-specific integration of market

and technology

The unique situation of the company—almost monopo-

list and strongly dependent on regulations—leads to a

phenomenon called ‘regulatory push’. A whole team of

environment observationalists continuously screen and

evaluate new laws, amendments, and political initiatives

on one hand, and on the other hand, continuously estimate

and classify future actions, laws, and (political and

legislative) changes. If these changes are of only minor

importance, required adjustments in current products and

services are directly executed (e.g., modifications in current

software applications). Impulses for radically new products

or services are transferred to the appropriate corporate

innovation process (e.g., a new law which allows tax

attorneys to found subsidiary companies). This process is

initiated by trends and ideas, which are triggered by

research, customers, law, etc. (see

Fig. 11


).

Therefore, ‘idea splitters’ are identified by means of

strategic technology and market monitoring. If this is

applicable to the company’s innovation search fields, these

splitters get a definite structure and design for further

enhancements.

Depending on the type and origin of the idea, specific

processes

are

provided.



Product

improvements,

for

example, go to the PIMO (Product Improvement Office);



product

innovations

to

the


PINO

(Product


Inno-

vation Office), etc. Consequently, people act like project

managers in order to drive an idea to an innovation

throughout the whole innovation process. The most

important success factor in this context is the sustain-

able integration of the idea contributors. The next steps

follow the internal guidelines of efficient project manage-

ment with adequate milestones, progress planning, and

controlling.

In order to gather ‘idea splitters’, employees of

the

department



of

strategic

technology

monitoring,

environment

monitoring,

and

product


management

all practice their described research, monitoring, and

management autonomously. Meetings take place on a

regular basis to discuss current topics, trends, and

opportunities. Then, in coordination with the upper

management, stakeholder workshops and scenario groups

are conducted.

3.4.1. Stakeholder workshops

So-called ‘stakeholder workshops’ have the objective of

bringing internal and external experts together. A special

focus lies on the balanced mix of know-how from the fields

of technology, market, and regulation (see

Fig. 12

).

Against a background of over 5000 employees and their



corresponding departments, it is a challenge not only to

bring the internal personnel together, but also to integrate

external parties on a regular basis.

Within this concept, a workshop is opened to other

external parties, distinguishing between experts and inter-

ested parties. Experts can be chosen from ‘friendly’

organizations and companies such as industry associations,

law specialists, economy professionals, etc., while inter-

ested parties can be either internal (like corporate planning

or field service) or external (like suppliers or distributors).

Depending on the level of abstraction, trends and ideas can

be identified and discussed. In the best case-scenario,

company-relevant and therefore, product or process-

relevant trends can be identified and retained for further

developments. The most important outcome is the deter-

mination of specific search fields, derived from the

identified trends, which are the precondition for the

following constitution of foresight groups. Detailed pro-

duct and process ideas may also result from these work-

shops. They are directly forwarded to the corporate

innovation management system (see

Figs. 1–10

).

3.4.2. Scenario groups



In order to transfer results from the stakeholder work-

shop into the company, further internal efforts are needed.

Consequently, it was decided to establish so-called

‘scenario groups,’ which consist of people from strategic

technology monitoring, environment observation, and

strategic product management. First of all, participants

from several departments are chosen, eight people at the

most. Additional external expertise is added where needed

(e.g. for actual jurisprudence knowledge). It is necessary to

hold some meetings in advance in order to structure the

meetings that usually take two days. From there, market-

ing staff, business objectives, 5-year-forecasts, and actual

environment observations are called in. The technology

monitoring also contributes edited and conditioned tech-

nology developments and precise new technologies. The

goal is now to generate scenarios for the next five to ten

ARTICLE IN PRESS

Definition of search

field and idea

generation

Idea structure and 

design

Idea enhancement

with fixed

responsibilities

Trends &

ideas

Product improvements

Process suggestions

Product innovations

Product improvement process

Process innovation process

Product innovation process

Innovat

ion

Fig. 11. Overview of the corporate idea management process.

A. Brem, K.-I. Voigt / Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367

361


Author's personal copy

years based on the trends recognized in the stakeholder

workshops. So, a target-oriented discussion is possible

because all participants have already discussed specific

search fields. The people from the technology side report

their recently identified technological potentials, while the

staff from the market and product side explains new

market needs and problems in the context of the existing

product portfolio. Employees from environment observa-

tion also bring in general trends. Depending on the search

field, explorative scenarios or accrued scenarios are

applicable. Explorative scenarios evolve into different

scenarios based on the current status quo (see

Fig. 13


).

In contrast, accrued scenarios start from more-or-less

defined pictures of the future in order to develop scenarios

on how to get there through several stages of development

(see

Fig. 14


).

Thus, dependent on the results of the stakeholder

workshop and irrespective of the kind of scenario, either

concept can be the proper instrument for strategic

innovation planning. Based on these scenarios, currently

offered products and services can be discussed. Further-

more, cases can be developed as to how these scenarios will

affect them under different conditions. Finally, ideas for

future products and services can be generated.

3.4.3. Further action

The results of the stakeholder workshops and scenario

groups are appropriately recorded and transferred into the

specific innovation process (e.g., into the product innova-

tion or product improvement process,

Fig. 6

). All trends



and ideas are extensively documented for further presenta-

tions and discussions with other employees and partners.

However, there are only limited experiences from these

introduced instruments, because the first workshop was

conducted one year before, and the first results are just

getting into action right now.

ARTICLE IN PRESS

Interested parties

Operating departments

Management

Experts

Distributors

Technology

Planning

Customers

Field service

etc.

Business

vision

Trends

Network of 

experts

Ideas

Experts

Functional 

relevant trend

Level of 

abstraction

Functional 

comprehensive

trend


Company-

relevant 

trend

Market

Economy

Legislation

Competition

Technology

Security

Customer needs

R&D

etc.

Fig. 12. Concept of a stakeholder workshop.



Scenario 2

Scenario 1

Trend line

0

2

0

2

y

a

d

o

T

2015

Starting point oriented

Basis assumptions

=

Status quo/ 

current situation

Fig. 13. Explorative scenario planning concept (

Gausemeier et al., 1995

).

A. Brem, K.-I. Voigt / Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367



362

Author's personal copy

Obviously, the success of this approach depends on the

integration of the ‘right’ people experts at the ‘right’ time.

For that purpose, applications are possible, but most of the

participants are still selected (by the workshop organizer)

because they are known as ‘innovative people’. In this

respect, a more transparent and traceable process is needed

to assure a better integration of the people involved.

Moreover, there are no performance measures for the

success of the processes yet. As this is a very important part

of the innovation controlling, further action is needed in

this area to have a better argumentation basis for or

against certain initiatives. Currently, the company is

thinking about future measures, such as the amount

of ideas per team and year, or the percentage of new

products (which are less than two years old), in the entire

product portfolio.

4. Discussion and implications

As stated, technology push and market pull cannot be

declared as the right or the wrong way to sustainable

innovations. It depends on assorted variables—such as the

specific industry, the company’s history, etc.—which

strategy suits best. Some companies are still on the right

track by focusing on technology or market needs only.

However, there are several examples that a one-sided

innovation strategy does not work in the long term either.

Against the background of the case, one can see that

bringing technology and market together is not just a

matter of (inter-organizational) communication and de-

tailed definition of strategic search fields. All sides of

innovation sources are encouraged to give practical input

(e.g., the marketing contingent by setting minimum criteria

for project evaluations rather than defining general targets)

(

Becker and Lillemark, 2006



). By conducting interdisci-

plinary teams with lasting integration of internal and

external parties, the danger of unidirectional research, as

well as relying solely on market trends, can be reduced.

Moreover, the researched company invests many efforts in

the idea generation and evaluation phase, which is also

very cost-intensive. In this context, recent research

indicates that the idea quality and the idea generation

phase are important determinants of innovative capacities,

especially of large-scale firms (

Koc and Ceylan, 2007

).

Within the framework of this paper, a new innovation



management framework was introduced based on con-

siderations of recent research (e.g.,

Burgelman and

Sayles, 2004

;

Pearson, 1990



;

Pfeiffer et al., 1997

, etc.).

Summarizing the described procedures of the company, a

holistic picture of their innovation triggers can be drawn

(see


Fig. 15

).

First of all, there is certain proof that the introduced



framework is similar to the processes researched in the

case. For example, incremental and radical product

and process innovations are induced by market needs

(strategic product management staff) and new technologies

(strategic technology monitoring department), with rele-

vant problems being supported and controlled by the upper

management (corporate interest). In addition to that, the

company has well-defined innovation processes depending

on the different types of innovations.

Still, there are several points which are not included in

the model, such as the intervallic workshops for generating

relevant problems. The influence of ‘regulatory push’ is

relatively extraordinary as well.

The term ‘regulatory push’ itself comes from the area of

ecological economics, and more precisely, from eco-

innovations (

Rennings, 2000

).

1



Until now, no technology

or innovation management literature could be identified

which methodically deals with regulatory push in areas

other than ecology. ‘Regulatory push’ can be used to

ARTICLE IN PRESS

0

2

0

2

y

a

d

o

T

2015

Scenario 1

Trend line

Scenario 2

Ending point oriented

Basis assumptions

=

Precise pictures of 

the future

Fig. 14. Accrued scenario planning concept (

Gausemeier et al., 1995

).

1



Whereas Renning uses the term ‘regulatory push/pull’ only in context

with ecological innovation.

A. Brem, K.-I. Voigt / Technovation 29 (2009) 351–367

363


Author's personal copy

summarize existing law, expected regulation, standards,

political decisions, etc. The origin is not surprising, as

ecologically generated innovations are strongly dependent

on environmental regulations (for instance, the aforesaid

example of the chemical industry in the last century). The

regulatory push framework is complemented by other

industry, company, economy, and culturally specific

features, as these characteristics are leading to different

starting conditions in terms of their innovation activities.

Moreover, these features can explain the different intensity

of the determinants and effects of innovations (

Rehfeld

et al., 2007



). In this case, the regulatory push influences

the relevant problems indirectly through market needs

(e.g., customers say they need a new tool because of a

certain new law), and directly, (e.g., through opportunities

for new business models or even business units).

Finally, the question remains as to why previous

research did not include a factor like regulatory push.

One reason could be the fact that earlier research was done

in areas where there were no regulations (e.g., computer

industry, desktop applications) or that the regulations were

stable and implicit.

The changes introduced in the case are obviously

relevant for all companies, but in a special context in this

case study, it is because their product and service portfolio

is predominantly based on the consequences of legal issues.

Therefore, the regulatory push impulses are elementary,

affecting the incremental product and service improve-

ments, as well as new product development. In terms of

market pull and technology push, these stimuli can be seen

as main influencing factors of new or changing market

needs. So, the external political and legal influences are

playing an especially important role for relevant problems

and changing market needs in the future. Furthermore,

relevant problems can be directly triggered by technology

push, market pull, and/or corporate interest, as well as a

combination of all these aspects together via workshops,

scenario groups, etc.

Fig. 16


shows the integration of the insights from the

case into the adopted framework.

Right now, it cannot be proven that this extended

framework is valid for all branches or companies, but it

may give some impulses for further research. It is at least

applicable for the German software industry, especially in

the context of companies in the environment of legal and

regulatory issues, as their specific requirements are

accordingly integrated. Whether this is a certain German

phenomenon or not needs to be researched in future

studies. Finally, a generalization of the model depends on

the results of future research in this area.

Moreover, there is a great deal of research done in the

area of case-specific management systems within the

literature focusing on innovation management. Still, there

has not been any comprehensive theory developed yet of

how to organize corporate innovation on an abstract level,

combining the various research results.

Hence, a draft of an advanced idea tunnel as a front end

innovation model based on the case study will be

introduced (see

Fig. 17


).

Based on the idea tunnel, several elements were

added (e.g., a pool for saving ideas). This is necessary in

order not to loose deferred ideas, which are not appro-

priate to the current corporate strategy guidelines.

Moreover, the front end is well-defined as the phase

of idea collection and idea creation, enhanced by the

level of creativity and the innovation culture of the

corporation. Another important aspect concerns rejected

ideas. A detailed and comprehensive feedback is crucial

in two areas: firstly, regarding the willingness of the

involved person for future input, and secondly, concerning

the willingness of other people facing the internal and

external effects of a disappointed and unsatisfied idea

contributor.

Moreover, it is important to guarantee a permanent

input of market and technology expertise, and not only

within the idea generation stage. Finally, this approach is

in contrast to many others not solely aligned to product

innovation, but all kinds of innovative ideas. Still, it is

fundamental that there is a given process flow for each kind

of innovation (

Voigt and Brem, 2006

).

ARTICLE IN PRESS




Yüklə 316,83 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə