Taxonomy and Conservation Status of Pteridophyte Flora of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 3,6 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/27
tarix13.08.2017
ölçüsü3,6 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   27

148
Taxonomy and Conservation Status of Pteridophyte Flora of Sri Lanka 
R.H.G. Ranil and D.K.N.G. Pushpakumara
University of  Peradeniya
Introduction 
The recorded history of exploration of pteridophytes in Sri Lanka dates back to 1672-1675 
when Poul Hermann had collected a few fern specimens which were first described by Linneus 
(1747) in Flora Zeylanica.  The majority of Sri Lankan pteridophytes have been collected in the 
19
th
 century during the British period and some of them have been published as catalogues 
and checklists.  However, only Beddome (1863-1883) and Sledge (1950-1954) had conducted 
systematic studies and contributed significantly to today’s knowledge on taxonomy and diversity 
of Sri Lankan pteridophytes (Beddome, 1883; Sledge, 1982).  Thereafter, Manton (1953) and 
Manton and Sledge (1954) reported chromosome numbers and some taxonomic issues of 
selected Sri Lankan Pteridophytes.  Recently, Shaffer-Fehre (2006) has edited the volume 15 
of the revised handbook to the flora of Ceylon on pteridophyta (Fern and Fern Allies).
The  local  involvement  of  pteridological  studies  began  with  Abeywickrama  (1956;  1964; 
1978), Abeywickrama and Dassanayake (1956); and Abeywickrama and De Fonseka, (1975) 
with the preparations of checklists of pteridophytes and description of some fern families.  
Dassanayake (1964), Jayasekara (1996), Jayasekara et al., (1996), Dhanasekera (undated), 
Fenando (2002), Herat and Rathnayake (2004) and Ranil et al., (2004; 2005; 2006) have also 
contributed to the present knowledge on Pteridophytes in Sri Lanka.  However, only recently
Ranil and co workers initiated a detailed study on biology, ecology and variation of tree ferns 
(Cyatheaceae)  in  Kanneliya  and  Sinharaja  MAB  reserves  combining  field  and  laboratory 
studies and also taxonomic studies on island-wide Sri Lankan fern flora. As a result, Ranil et 
al. (2010a; 2010b) have described two new pteridophyte species from Sri Lanka and identified 
conservation priorities for Sri Lankan tree ferns in 2011 (Ranil et al., 2011).  Ranil et al.,  
(in prep.) reviewed and revised the list of endemic pteridophytes in Sri Lanka.
Currently, about 348 pteridophyte taxa from 30 families have been recorded from Sri Lanka, 
of which 50 taxa are reported to be endemic to the country (Shaffer-Fehre, 2006).  Among 
Asian countries, Sri Lanka is second only to Taiwan in terms of the number of pteridophyte 
species per 10,000 km
2
 (Ranil et al., 2008a).  Geographical isolation, and a wide range of 
climatic, elevational and soil type variation in Sri Lanka may have resulted in rich diversity 
of pteridophyte flora as well along with exceptionally high level of endemism.  It is reported 
that Sri Lankan pteridophytes have strong phyto-geographical relationships with South Indian 
species.  Further, both the Sri Lankan and the South Indian pteridophyte flora also have phyto-
geographical relationship with three regions, namely the Sino-Himalayan flora, the Malesian 
flora from South East Asia, and an African element connected with the Seychelles, Mascarenes, 
Madagascar and East Africa (Fraser-Jenkins, 1984).  Despite historical and recent information 
on pteridophyte flora of Sri Lanka, this is the first instance that the pteridophyte flora has been 
assessed based on the national Red Listing criteria.

149
Taxonomy 
The present knowledge of ptridophytes is largely based on Shaffer-Fehre (2006) which is 
mainly based on morphology and specimens of existing herbarium collections rather than new 
information.  It has been prepared during 1993-1995 period but published in 2006.  However, 
with the advancement of plant molecular studies, taxonomic status of many fern species have 
changed and many revisions have been made.  On the other hand, recently an extensive 
field survey of South Indian fern flora has been carried out, though such information has not 
been widely published yet.  Recent review of endemic pteridophyte flora in Sri Lanka parallel 
to information generated through South Indian survey via personal communication revealed 
that the changes of number of endemic taxa from 50 (Shaffer-Fehre, 2006) to 44 (Ranil et 
al.,  in  prep.).   All  these  indicated  the  need  of  a  systematic  review  of  the  taxonomy  of  Sri 
Lankan pteridophytes based on detailed field works and existing herbarium collections and 
also considering with advances of taxonomy and systematics due to molecular studies on 
pteridophytes.  For the red listing process, except for three families, namely Aspleniaceae, 
Cyatheaceae  and Thelypteridaceae  (where  there  is  no  agreement  among  pteridologists  to 
place Sri Lankan species within families, hence followed Shaffer-Fehre (2006), all species 
have been arranged based on the linear sequence of extant families and genera of lycophytes 
and ferns proposed by Christenhusz et al., (2011).  Changes of genera and families according 
to Christenhusz et al. (2011) are given in Table 1.
Table  1:  Changes  of  genera  and  families  based  on  recent  classification  proposed  by 
Christenhusz et al. (2011). 
Taxa
Flora of Ceylon (2006) by 
Shaffer-Fehre (2006)
Redlist (2012) based on Chris-
tenhusz et al. (2011)
Genera
Antrophyum 
Vittariaceae
Pteridaceae
Arthropteris 
Oleandraceae
Tectariaceae
Athyrium
Woodsiaceae
Athyriaceae
Bolbitis
Lomariopsidaceae
Dryopteridaceae
Ceratopteris
Parkeriaceae
Pteridaceae
Deparia 
Woodsiaceae
Athyriaceae
Diplazium
Woodsiaceae
Athyriaceae
Elaphoglossum
Lomariopsidaceae
Dryopteridaceae
Hypodematium  
Woodsiaceae
Hypodematiaceae
Leucostegia 
Davalliaceae
Hypodematiaceae
Lindsaea
Dennstaedtiaceae
Lindsaeaceae
Loxogramme
Loxogrammaceae
Polypodiaceae
Lygodium 
Schizaeaceae
Lygodiaceae
Monogramma
Vittariaceae
Pteridaceae
Nephrolepis
Oleandraceae
Nephrolepidaceae
Pteridrys
Dryopteridaceae
Tectariaceae
Sphenomeris
Dennstaedtiaceae
Lindsaeaceae
Tectaria 
Dryopteridaceae
Tectariaceae
Teratophyllum
Lomariopsidaceae
Dryopteridaceae
Vittaria
Vittariaceae
Pteridaceae
Family 
Grammitidaceae
Grammitidaceae
Polypodiaceae

150
Distribution 
Limited research has been conducted to identify distribution of pterdophyte flora in Sri Lanka.  
About 81% of pteridophyte specimens in the National Herbarium have been collected from 
the wet zone area of the country (Jayasekera and Wijesundara, 1993).  The wet zone which 
accounts for only one third of the country’s total land area also contains almost all endemic 
pteridophytes except one species (Ranil et al., in prep.).  Further, study on distribution pattern 
of  endemic  pteridophyte  flora  of  Sri  Lanka  revealed  that  those  are  more-or-less  equally 
distributed among the wet zone areas of the up, mid and low countries with 34, 31 and 32 taxa, 
respectively (Ranil et al., 2008a).  Majority of endemic pteridophytes (78%) of Sri Lanka had 
been collected from the Central Province where Nuwara Eliya district alone provided the highest 
number of endemic taxa collected with 34 taxa followed by Sabaragamuwa and Southern 
provinces.  Even though some species occur in a few districts, their known occurrence has 
been limited only to a few isolated localities (i.e. Cyathea hookeriC. sinuataC. sledgei and 
C. srilankensis; Ranil et al., 2010a; 2010b).  Long duration of rainfall and high relative humidity 
associated with elevational gradient may be one of the reasons for the presence of higher 
number of endemic taxa in the wet zone and the Central Province.  In addition, close proximity 
to the Botanical Gardens of Peradeniya and Hakgala had also influenced a higher number of 
species collections from the Central Province and Nuwara Eliya district.
Endemic and endangered tree ferns in lowland rainforests. 
A:   Cyathea sledgei Ranil et al.,: A recently described new endemic tree fern species in Kanneliya 
MAB reserve.
B:   Cyathea srilankensis  Ranil:  A  recently  discovered  new  endemic  tree  fern  species  in  Beraliya 
proposed forest reserve. 
C:   Cyathea sinuata Hook. & Grew.: The only known simple leaf  tree ferns in the world.
 
Two endemic ferns species in southern lowland rainforests. 
A:   Tectaria thwaitesii (Bedd.) Ching: An endemic fern species in roadside banks of  Kottawa forest 
reserve.
B:   Oreogrammits sledgei (Parris) Parris: An endemic fern species grows on moist rock in Sinharaja 
world heritage site. 
A
B
C
A
B

151
Threats 
Vast  majority  of  pteridophyte  flora  and  almost  all  endemic  pteridophytes  in  Sri  Lanka  are 
confined to the wet zone areas of the lowland, sub montane and montane regions.  However, 
most  of  the  remaining  forests  in  the  wet  zone  area  are  fragmented  and  small.    They  are 
continued to be degraded due to illegal encroachment and suffer further fragmentation due to 
higher population densities in such areas.  The area is highly subjected to habitat loss, spread 
of alien-invasive species, soil erosion and environmental pollution.  These are considered 
as the most immediate threats to the pteridophyte flora of Sri Lanka.  In areas such as the 
Knuckles region, the forest understorey which is the main habitat for pteridophytes has been 
cleared for cardamom cultivation whereas in Udawattakele forest understorey is invaded by 
alien-invasive species; also make significant threats to regeneration of pteridophytes.  Another 
threat of increasing importance is the illicit removal and over exploitation of ornamentally 
important rare ferns from the wild.  These problems will be worsening by change of climate 
and increasing human population pressure.
Conservation issues
The effective conservation of Sri Lankan pteridophyte flora will depend largely on how effective 
the conservation of natural forests in the wet zone areas of the country.  For this, minimizing of 
fragmentation and habitat loss through effective land use planning and a sound policy framework 
is a must. Further, according to the present Red Listing, of the 335 pteridophyte species
219 species (66%) are listed as threatened species (20, 41, 87 and 71 species are critically 
endangered and possibly extinct (CR(PE)) critically endangered (CR), endangered (EN) and 
vulnerable (VU).  Another 40 species are listed as near threatened (NT).  This highlighted that, in 
addition to conservation of natural forests in the wet zone areas, monitoring of populations of at 
least threatened species is a necessary to understand effectiveness of the in situ conservation of 
pteridophyte flora.  At present, ex situ conservation is limited to a few local species at the Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Peradeniya and Botanic Gardens of Hakgala and Henerathgoda.  Therefore, 
strengthening of ferneries of the network of the National Botanic Gardens is urgently required as 
a supplementary conservation measure for Sri Lankan pteridophytes.
Research gaps and needs
Further enhancement of current knowledge and understanding of pteridophytes flora needs 
several measures.  As highlighted a comprehensive taxonomic revision need to be carried out 
in the light of recent floral survey in the South Asia and recent advances of taxonomy due to 
use of molecular investigations.  A close collaboration between pteridologists in India (as well 
as elsewhere) and Sri Lanka is a pre-requisite.  Much of the specimens of pteridophytes have 
been collected from 1847 to 1900 by European pteridologists and deposited in herbaria of 
elsewhere than the National Herbarium.  Thus, an island-wide floristic survey on pteridophyte 
taxa is urgently required in Sri Lanka which helps to revise the taxonomy, distribution and 
other conservation issues of the island pteridophyte flora.  Upgrading of the collection of the 
National Herbarium is also a must and should be carried out parallel to the floristic survey.  
Further, recent work by Ranil et al., (2008b) provides encouraging results on domestication 
of C. walkerae and need to expand to other species which has commercial potentials.  Public 
awareness programs on the conservation and sustainable use of pteridophytes should also be 
initiated promoting in situ and ex situ conservation.

152
Conclusions and Recommendations
Lowland rainforests, sub-montane and montane forests are the major natural vegetation 
types supporting the biodiversity of Pteridophytes in Sri Lanka.  However, these ecosystems 
are heavily affected by various biotic and abiotic influences and already highly fragmented.  
Increasing population pressure and climate change further worsen the situation.  These facts 
highlight the importance of conserving the remaining forest ecosystems of the wet zone of 
the country.  It is also essential to conduct further research to fill the gaps of knowledge of 
Sri Lankan pteridophytes which will provide a basis to resolve many of the taxonomic and 
conservation issues pteridophytes face today.
References
Abeywickrama,  B.A.  (1956).  The  Genera  of  Ceylon  Pteridophytes.  The  Ceylon  Journal  of  Science  (Biological 
Science) 13(1): 1-30. 
Abeywickrama, B.A. (1964). The Pteridophytes of the Knuckles region.  The Ceylon Journal of Science (Biological 
Science) 5(1): 18-29.
Abeywickrama, B.A. (1978). A checklist of the Pteridophytes of Sri Lanka. National Science Council of Sri Lanka, 
Colombo, Sri Lanka.
Abeywickrama, B.A. and Dassanayeke, M.D. (1956). Crepidomanes bilabiatum (Neem et Bl.) Copel. A fern new to 
Ceylon from Ritigala. The Ceylon Journal of Science (A). 13(1): 1-2.
Abeywickrama, B.A. and De Fonseka, R.N. (1975). The Ceylon Ophioglossaceae. The Ceylon Journal of Science 
(Biological Science) 10(2): 132-142.
Beddome, R.H. (1883). Handbook of the ferns of British India, Ceylon and the Malay Peninsula. 2nd edition. Today 
and Tomorrow's Printers and Publishers. New Delhi.
Christenhusz,  J.M.,  Zhang,  X-C  and  Schneider,  H.  (2011). A  linear  sequence  of  extant  families  and  genera  of 
lycophytes and ferns. Phylotaxa 19:7-54.
Dhanasekara,  D.M.U.B.  (Undated).  Current  taxonomic  status  of  fern  in  Sri  Lanka.  Royal  Botanical  Garden, 
Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. Unpublished and available at the Royal Botanical Garden, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka 
(available at the Royal Botanical Garden, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka).
Dassanayake, M.D. (1964). The development of buds of the Polypodium vulgare. The Ceylon Journal of Science 
(Biological Science) 5(1): 30-37. 
Fernando, B. (2002). Ferns of Sri Lanka. The fern Society of Sri Lanka. Katuneriya, Sri Lanka.
Fraser-Jenkins, C.R. (1984). An introduction to ferns genera of the Indian subcontinent. Bulletin of British Museum 
natural History (Botany) 12(2): 37-76. 
Herat, T.R. and Rathnayake, P. (2003). An illustrated guide to the fern flora of Knuckles conservation area. Forest 
Department, Digana.
Jayasekara,  P.  (1996). The  Hymenophyllaceae  of  Sri  Lanka.  In:  J.M.  Camus,  M.  Gibby  and  R.T.  Johns  (eds.). 
Pteridology in Perspective, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 173-174.
Jayasekera, P.W.B. and Wijesundara, D.S.A. (1993).  A herbarium survey of Pteridophytes of Sri Lanka.  Proceedings 
of the Forty Ninth Annual Session of the Sri Lanka Association for the Advancement of Science, December 
1993.  Part 1-Abstracts.  Vidya Mandiraya, Vidya Mawatha, Colombo 7, Sri Lanka. pp. 66.
Jayasekara, P., Herat, R.T. and Weerasinghe. (1996). Rediscovery of three rare ferns species from low land rain 
forest. PHYTA 4(1): 47-51.
Linnaeus, C. (1747). Flora Zeylanica. Laurentius Salvius, Holmaiae. 
Manton, I. (1953). The cytological evolution of the fern flora of Ceylon. Symposia Society of Experimental Biology 
7: 174-175.
Manton, I. and Sledge, W.A. (1954). Observations on the cytological and taxonomy of the Pteridophyte flora of 
Ceylon. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London.  Series B, Biological Sciences, 238 (654): 
127-185.\
Ranil, R.H.G., Pushpakumara, D.K.N.G., Wijesundera, D.S.A., Dhanasekara, D.M.U.B. and Gunawardena, H.G. 
(2004) Biodiversity of Pteridophyta in Kanneliya Man and Biosphere Reserve.  The Sri Lanka Forester 27: 
1-10.

153
Ranil, R.H.G., Pushpakumara, D.K.N.G, and Wijesundara, D.S.A. (2008a). Present status of taxonomic research 
and  conservation  of  endemic  pteridophytes  in  Sri  Lanka.    In: Amoroso,  V.B.  (Ed.).  Proceedings  of  the  4
th
 
Symposium  on  Asian  Pteridology  and  Garden  Show.    Central  Mindanao  University,  Musuan,  Bukidnon, 
Philippines.  pp. 84-93.
Ranil, R.H.G., Pushpakumara, D.K.N.G., Wijesundara, D.S.A. and Dhanasekara, D.M.U.B. (2008b). Domestication 
of Cyathea walkerae Hook. Sri Lankan Journal of Agricultural Science 45: 47-58.
Ranil, R.H.G.,
  Pushpakumara,  D.K.N.G.,  Janssen,  T.,  Fraser-Jenkins,  C.R.  and  Wijesundara,  D.S.A.  (2010a). 
Cyathea sledgei Ranil et al., (Cyatheaceae): A new species of tree-fern from Sri Lanka. Fern Gazette 18(7): 
318-325.
Ranil, R.H.G., Pushpakumara, D.K.N.G., Janssen, T., Wijesundara, D.S.A. and Dhanasekara, D.M.U.B. (2010b). 
Cyathea srilankensis Ranil: a new tree fern species from Sri Lanka.  American Fern Journal 100(1): 39-44.
Ranil,  R.H.G.,  Pushpakumara,  D.K.N.G.,  Fraser-Jenkins,  C.R.,  and  Wijesundara,  D.S.A.  (2010c).  Presumed 
extinctions in the pteridophyte flora of Sri Lanka. Presented at the 5
th
 symposium on Asian Pteridology held 
from 15
th
–21
st
 November 2010 in the Shenzhen Fairylake Botanical Garden, Scenzhen, China. Organized by 
the Chinese Fern Society and Fairylake Botanical Garden, China.  pp. 41-42.
Ranil, R.H.G.,
  Pushpakumara,  D.K.N.G.,  Janssen,  T.,  Fraser-Jenkins,  C.R.  and  Wijesundara,  D.S.A.  (2011). 
Conservation priorities for tree ferns (Cyatheaceae) in Sri Lanka. Taiwania 56(3): 201-209.
Ranil, R.H.G., Fraser-Jenkins, C.R., Pushpakumara, D.K.N.G., Parris, B.S. and Wijesundara, D.S.A. (in prep.). 
A  revised  checklist  of  endemic  Pteridophyte  flora  of  Sri  Lanka:  Taxonomy,  geographical  distribution  and 
conservation status. American Fern Journal.
Shaffer-Fehre, M. (ed.). (2006). A revised handbook of the flora of Ceylon. Volumes XV: Pteridophyta (ferns and fern 
allies).  Amrind Publishing Company Private Limited, New Delhi, India.
Sledge,  W.A.  (1982). An  annotated  checklist  of  the  Pteridophyta  of  Ceylon.  Botanical  Journal  of  the  Linnaean 
Society 84: 1-30.

154
Family
EX EW CR 
(PE)
CR
EN
VU
NT
DD
LC
Total   
Threatened
Total  
Species
Aspleniaceae
4 (1)
3
6 (1)
7
4
5
16 (1)
29 (2)
Athyriaceae
3
9
7
4
1
2
19 (3)
26 (5)
Blechnaceaea
2
1
1
2
4
6
Cyatheaceae
1
5
1
7 (4)
7 (5)
Davalliaceae
1
1
1
1
1
3
5
Dennstaedtiaceae
3
2
1
1
3
4
10 (1)
Dryopteridaceae
1
6
12
7
3
2
25 (6)
31 (8)
Equisetaceae
 
 
1
1
1
Gleicheniaceae
 
 
 
1
1
0
2
Hymenophyllaceae
4
9
5
1
18 (3)
19 (3)
Hypodematiaceae
 
1
 
1
1
2
Isoetaceae
 
1
 
1
1
Lindsaeaceae
4
3
2
1
2
9 (2)
12 (2)
Lycopodiaceae
1
7
3
1
1
1
11
14
Lygodiaceae
 
 
1
1
1
1
3
Marattiaceae
 
1
 
1
1
2
Marsileaceae
1
 
 
1
1
2
Nephrolepidaceae
 
 
1
1
1
1
1
4
Oleandraceae
 
 
1
1
1
Ophioglossaceae
1
8
 
9
9
Osmundaceae
 
1
 
1 (1)
1 (1)
Polypodiaceae
2
9
6
7
6
2
14
22 (5)
46 (9)
Psilotaceae
 
 
1
1
1
Pteridaceae
6
1
4
8
8
2
17
13 (4)
46 (4)
Schizaeaceae
 
 
 
1
0
1
Selaginellaceae
 
 
2
5
2
2 (1)
9 (1)
Tectariaceae
1
1
3
3
1
3
7 (1)
12 (2)
Thelypteridaceae
3
2
9
10
4
1
5
21 (2)
34 (6)
Totals
21 (5) 42 (10) 88 (11) 70 (12) 40 (9) 12 (1) 63 (1)
200 (33)
336 (49)
Table 13: Summary of the Status of Pteridophytes in Sri Lanka
(Endemics are shown in bracket)

155
Table 14: List of Pteridophytes in Sri Lanka                                                                                                                                     
(Endemic species are marked in 
Bold letters )
Family/ Scientific Name
Common name
NCS
Criteria
GCS
Family : Lycopodiaceae
Huperzia ceylanica (Spring) Trevis.
S: Kuda-hedaya
EN
B1ab(i,ii,iii)+2ab(i,ii,iii)  
Huperzia hamiltonii (Spreng.) Trevis.
S: Kuda-hedaya
EN
B1ab(i,ii,iii)+2ab(i,ii,iii)  
Huperzia phlegmaria (L.) Rothm.
S: Maha-hedaya
VU
B1ab(i,ii,iii)
 
Huperzia phyllantha (Hook. & Arn.) Holub
S: Maha-hedaya
VU
B1ab(i,ii,iii)
 
Huperzia pinifolia Trevis.
S: Kuda-hedaya
CR
B1ab(i,ii,iii)+2ab(i,ii,iii)  
Huperzia pulcherrima (Hook. & Grev.) Pichi.-Serm. S: Kuda-hedaya
VU
B1ab(i,ii,iii)
 
Huperzia serrata (Thunb. ex Murray) Trevis.
S: Kuda-hedaya
EN
B1ab(i,ii,iii)+2ab(i,ii,iii)  
Huperzia squarrosa (G. Forst.) Trevis.
S: Kuda-hedaya
EN
B1ab(i,ii,iii)+2ab(i,ii,iii)  
Huperzia subulifolia (Wall. ex Hook. & Grev.) 
Trevis.
S: Kuda-hedaya
EN
B1ab(i,ii,iii)
 
Huperzia vernicosa (Hook. & Grev.) Trevis.
S: Kuda-hedaya
DD
 
 
Lycopodiella caroliniana (L.) Pichi.-Serm.
 
NT
 
 
Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pichi.-Serm.
S: Badal-hanassa, 
Badal-wanassa
LC
 
 
Lycopodium japonicum Thunb. ex Murray
 
EN
B1ab(i,ii,iii)+2ab(i,ii,iii)  
Lycopodium wightianum Wall. ex Grev. & Hook.
 
EN
B1ab(i,ii,iii)+2ab(i,ii,iii)  


Yüklə 3,6 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   27




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə