Telephone: +61 8 9334 0500



Yüklə 1,37 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü1,37 Mb.

ISSN 0085–4417

All enquiries and manuscripts should be directed to:

Telephone:  

+61 8 9334 0500

Facsimile: 

+61 8 9334 0515

Email: 

nuytsia@dec.wa.gov.au



Web:  science.dec.wa.gov.au/nuytsia

The Managing Editor – NUYTSIA

Western Australian Herbarium

Dept of Environment and Conservation

Locked Bag 104 Bentley Delivery Centre

Western Australia    6983

AUSTRALIA

All material in this journal is copyright and may not be reproduced except with the written permission of the publishers.

©  Copyright Department of Environment and Conservation

WESTERN AUSTRALIA'S JOURNAL OF SYSTEMATIC BOTANY

Thiele, K.R.

Darwinia hortiorum (Myrtaceae: 

Chamelaucieae), a new species from the 

Darling Range, Western Australia

Nuytsia 20: 277–281 (2010)

Nuytsia


277

K.R. Thiele, Darwinia hortiorum (Myrtaceae: Chamelaucieae), a new species 



Nuytsia 20: 277–281 (2010)

Darwinia hortiorum (Myrtaceae: Chamelaucieae), a new species from 

the Darling Range, Western Australia

Kevin R. Thiele

Western Australian Herbarium, Department of Environment and Conservation,  

Locked Bag 104, Bentley Delivery Centre, Western Australia 6983  

Email: kevin.thiele@dec.wa.gov.au



Abstract

Thiele, K.R. Darwinia hortiorum (Myrtaceae: Chamelaucieae), a new species from the Darling 

Range, Western Australia. Nuytsia 20: 277–281 (2010). The distinctive, new, rare species Darwinia 

hortiorum  is  described,  illustrated  and  discussed.  Uniquely  in  the  genus  it  has  strongly  curved-

zygomorphic flowers with the sigmoid styles arranged so that they group towards the centre of the 

head-like inflorescences.

Introduction

Darwinia Rudge comprises c. 90 species, mostly from the south-west of Western Australia with 

c. 15 species in New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia. Phylogenetic analyses (M. Barrett, 

unpublished) have shown that the genus is polyphyletic, with distinct eastern and western Australian 

clades. Along with the related genera Actinodium Schauer, Chamelaucium Desf., Homoranthus A.Cunn. 

ex Schauer and Pileanthus Labill., the Darwinia clades are nested in a paraphyletic Verticordia DC.

Many  undescribed  species  of  Darwinia  are  known  in Western Australia,  and  these  are  being 

progressively described (Rye 1983; Marchant & Keighery 1980; Marchant 1984; Keighery & Marchant 

2002; Keighery 2009). A significant number of taxa in the genus are narrowly endemic or rare and 

are of high conservation significance. Although taxonomic reassignment of the Western Australian 

species of Darwinia may be required in the future, resolving the status of these undescribed species 

and describing them under their current genus helps provide information for conservation assessments 

and survey.

Darwinia hortiorum K.R.Thiele was first collected by Fred and Jean Hort in 2008 from granite 

outcrops in the Monadnocks Conservation Park and adjacent Boonering State Forest. It is clearly 

distinct from any known taxon, and is described here as new.


278

Nuytsia Vol. 20 (2010)

Taxonomy

Darwinia hortiorum K.R.Thiele, sp. nov.

Species floribus valde curvatis zygomorphicis, stylis sigmoideis a congeneribus diversa.



Typus: Monadnocks Conservation Park [precise locality withheld for conservation reasons], Western 

Australia, 15 November 2009, F. Hort 3525 & K. Thiele (holo: PERTH08243832; iso: CANB, MEL, 

NSW, K).

Darwinia sp. Wandering (F. Hort 3273), Western Australian Herbarium, in FloraBase, http://florabase.

calm.wa.gov.au [accessed 20 July 2010]

Erect to spreading, densely branched, rather compact, glabrous shrubs to 70 cm tall and to 80 cm 

wide, single-stemmed at the base with spreading main branches bearing numerous, ascending, leafy 

branchlets; young stems pale, with corrugate-corky, decurrent ridges extending for several nodes 

below each leaf insertion; bark on older stems reddish-brown, papery, decorticating in flakes. Leaves 

alternate, widely spreading, ± triquetrous, narrowly ovate to almost linear, 3–6 mm long, c. 1 mm 

wide, with a petiole c. 0.3 mm long; adaxial surface dark green, flat, nerveless, with obscure, sunken, 

pale oil glands tending to form a row each side of the midline; abaxial surface paler, keeled by a 

prominent,  thickened  midrib,  with  obscure,  sunken,  pale,  scattered  oil  glands;  margins  entire  or 

minutely, irregularly denticulate, with a very narrow, hyaline border; apex hyaline-acuminate but 

not pungent. Inflorescences erect, terminal to seasonal growth units (which continue to grow shortly 

after flowering), comprising 14–18(–22) pedunculate, 2-bracteolate flowers each in the axil of a bract, 

the apex vegetative and growing on shortly after flowering; inflorescence bracts slightly longer and 

wider than the leaves but otherwise similar; peduncles of the lowermost flowers 1.5–3.5 mm long, 

upper ones successively shorter; bracteoles broadly ovate, obtuse, with or without a soft, terminal 

apiculum, connate for the lowermost 1/4–1/3, closely enveloping the base of the hypanthium, c. 4 mm 

long (extending to the base of the sepals), scarious, pale brown with a darker, keeled midrib, with 

scattered translucent oil glands towards the apex. Hypanthium deeply 5-grooved, curved, 3.5–4 mm 

long, smooth, glossy reddish-brown paler at the base; sepals c. 3 mm long, erect (closely appressed 

to the petals), obtuse, thick, fleshy, dark green with pale, scarious margins, warty with scattered, 

prominent, pale oil glands; petals 2–3 mm long, those facing the centre of the inflorescence shorter 

than those opposite so that the corolla is curved-zygomorphic, incurved-erect, obtuse, thick, fleshy 

(similar in texture to the sepals), pale yellowish or suffused with crimson, smooth, glossy, with few, 

embedded oil glands. Stamens 10; anthers globose, c. 0.3 mm long, on filaments 0.8–1.5 mm long, 

protruding between the petals after anthesis; staminodes ovate, obtuse, c. 0.6 mm long, largely free 

from the stamens. Style distinctly sigmoid, the free portion curved so that the styles group towards the 

centre of the inflorescence, pale greenish to pale pink; substigmatic hairs c. 0.25 mm long, in a band 



c. 0.5 mm long immediately below the minute stigma, covered in oil and pollen at anthesis. Mature 

fruits not seen. (Figure 1)

Other specimens examined.WESTERN AUSTRALIA (all PERTH): [precise localities withheld for 

conservation reasons] Boonering State Forest, 23 Aug. 2008, F. Hort 3212 & J. Hort; Boonering State 

Forest, 23 Sep. 2008, F. Hort 3273; Boonering State Forest, 2 Nov. 2009, F. Hort 3514; Monadnocks 

Conservation Park, 15 Nov. 2009, F. Hort 3526 & J. Hort.



279

K.R. Thiele, Darwinia hortiorum (Myrtaceae: Chamelaucieae), a new species 



Distribution. Currently known from five localities in the Jarrah Forest IBRA Bioregion (Department 

of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts 2008), in an area c. 3 × 3 km in the Monadnocks 

Conservation Park and adjacent Boonering State Forest (Figure 2).

Habitat. All known populations are found in jarrah forest growing in association with large granite 

outcrops and their drainage lines. Close to the outcrops the plants are usually found growing in shallow 

granitic  soil  with  broken  stone  fringing  the  main  outcrops.  On  drainage  lines  more  distant  from 

outcrops the plants are found growing in loam or loam/clay soil associated with laterite. Characteristic 

associated species include Allocasuarina humilisAndersonia spp., Grevillea bipinnatifidaG. manglesii

Banksia  recurvistylis,  Hakea  undulata,  H.  trifurcata,  Verticordia  insignis,  Calytrix  depressa, 

Xanthorrhoea preissii and Hibbertia hypericoides

Phenology. Flowers from late September to early December.

Figure 1. Darwinia hortiorum. A – individual shrub; B – flowering branchlets; C, D – inflorescences (C – red-flowered 

variant; D – yellow-flowered variant); E – individual flower of the red-flowered variant. Photographers: A, B – J. Hort;  

C, D, E – K.Thiele.



280

Nuytsia Vol. 20 (2010)

Conservation statusDarwinia hortiorum was listed as Priority One under the informal phrase name 

Darwinia sp. Wandering (F. Hort 3273) by Smith (2010); this remains appropriate given its very  

localized distribution. It is locally common where it occurs, with population estimates to >500 plants. 

Some populations are in a gazetted Conservation Park; however, the area in which it occurs is threatened 

by Phytophthora cinnamomi dieback. Plants are killed by fire; many non-flowering juvenile plants have 

been observed in an area burnt 3-4 years previously (F. Hort, pers. comm.), suggesting that frequent 

fires may be deleterious for the species.



Etymology. Named in honour of Fred and Jean Hort, enthusiastic field botanists, expert plant-hunters 

and national treasures. 



Affinities and notesDarwinia hortiorum is distinctive with no obvious close relatives. It is superficially 

similar to D. thymoides, which occurs with it at some sites. Both species are small shrubs with small, 

± erect inflorescences lacking distinctly differentiated inflorescence bracts. However, D. thymoides 

has opposite, ± flat leaves, fewer (2–10) flowers per inflorescence, small, free bracteoles <1/4 the 

length of the hypanthium, styles which are incurved at the apex and distinctive, warty oil glands at 

the apices of the petals. Vegetatively, D. hortiorum is similar to D. apiculata, but the inflorescences 

in that species are subtended by differentiated, coloured bracts.

Figure 2. Distribution of Darwinia hortiorum ( ) in south-west 

Western Australia. IBRA Bioregion boundaries (Department 

of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts 2008) are 

shown in grey


281

K.R. Thiele, Darwinia hortiorum (Myrtaceae: Chamelaucieae), a new species 

Many species of Darwinia have slightly curved flowers, usually with the styles uncinate at their 

tips. In D. hortiorum, the corolla is more strongly zygomorphic than in other species, with the robust 

style emerging excentrically from the erect, fleshy petals and sigmoidally curved in such a way that all 

styles are presented in the centre of the inflorescence and are erect and not uncinate. This morphology 

is not seen in any other known species. The large, connate, bracteoles also appear to be unique.

In all populations there is a mix of red-flowered (with the petals distally suffused with crimson) 

and yellow-flowered (with the petals not suffused and hence pale yellow) individuals. There is no 

apparent colour change in the flowers after anthesis. The flowers have a pollen-presentation system, 

with a mix of pollen grains and oil deposited on the substigmatic brush of hairs as the style elongates 

during anthesis.



Acknowledgments

I would like to acknowledge Fred and Jean Hort for their diligence and expertise in surveying the 

flora of the Darling Range for new and noteworthy species. They brought this species to my attention, 

showed it to me in the field and collected excellent specimens from all known populations. Ryonen 

Butcher assisted during field work, Paul Wilson kindly translated the Latin diagnosis, and Mike Hislop 

and an anonymous reviewer provided invaluable comments on the manuscript. 



References

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2008). Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia 

(IBRA),  Version  6.1.  http://www.environment.gov.au/parks/nrs/science/bioregion-framework/ibra/index.html  [accessed 

8 May 2008]

Keighery, G.J. (2009). Six new and rare species of Darwinia (Myrtaceae) from Western Australia. Nuytsia 19(1): 37–52.

Marchant,  N.G.  (1984). A  new  species  of  Darwinia  (Myrtaceae)  from  the  Perth  region, Western Australia. Nuytsia  5(1): 

63–66.

Marchant, N.G. & Keighery, G.J. (1980). A new species and a new combination in Darwinia (Myrtaceae) from Western 



Australia. Nuytsia 3(2): 179–182.

Rye, B.L. (1983). Darwinia capitellata (Myrtaceae), a new species from south-western Australia. Nuytsia 4(3): 423–426.

Keighery, G.J. & Marchant, N.G. (2002). A new species of Darwinia (Myrtaceae) from Western Australia. Nordic Journal of 

Botany 22: 45-47.

Smith, M.G. (2010). Declared Rare and Priority Flora List for Western Australia. (Department of Environment and Conservation: 

Kensington, WA.)

Western Australian Herbarium (1998–). Florabase – The Western Australian flora. Department of Environment and Conservation.  



http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au [accessed 1 December 2009]

282

Nuytsia Vol. 20 (2010)


Yüklə 1,37 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə