The information given for each of the species in this section is a summary of know­



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Publication:

 in Craven & Lepschi, Australian Systematic 

Botany 12: 866 (1999)



Derivation:

 campanae, in honour of Barbara and Donald 

(Don) Bellairs, of Kalbarri, Western Australia—campanae 

is a noun in apposition derived from the Latin campana, 

bell, as the family name Bellairs is considered by some to 

pertain to bell­house



Description:

 

Shrub 

0.3–1.5 m tall. 



Branchlets 

gla­


brescent, sericeous. 

Leaves 

alternate, 12–57 mm 

long, 4–9.5 mm wide, 2.5–8 times as long as wide, 

short­petiolate; blade at length glabrescent, sericeous, 

narrowly obovate, very narrowly obovate, linear­elliptic, 

narrowly elliptic or elliptic, in transverse section trans­

versely linear, the base attenuate, the apex acuminate, 

obtusely shortly acuminate or obtuse to rounded, the 

veins longitudinal, 5 or rarely 7, 

oil glands 

moder­


ately dense to dense, obscure to distinct, scattered. 

Inflorescences 

capitate or shortly spicate, pseudotermi­

nal and sometimes also upper axillary, with 5–12 triads, 

up to 27 mm wide. 



Hypanthium 

hairy, 1.5–2 mm long. 



Calyx lobes 

abaxially hairy, 0.5–1 mm long, scarious in a 

marginal band 0.2–0.4 mm wide or scarious throughout. 

Petals 

caducous, 1.8–2.3 mm long. 



Stamens 

7–11 per 

bundle; filaments pink or mauve (rapidly fading to white), 

8.5–13.5 mm long, the bundle claw 1.9–5.7 mm long, 

0.2–0.5 times as long as the filaments. 

Style 

10.5–15 mm 

long. 

Ovules 

5–15 per locule. 



Infructescences 

globose. 



Fruit 

2.5–3 mm long, the calyx lobes weathering away or 

replaced by weakly developed sepaline teeth; cotyledons 

obvolute.



Natural occurrence:

  Western Australia: the 

Kalbarri–Geraldton district.



Ecology:

 Recorded as occurring in dense low shrubland

coastal sand plain, on lateritic soil, limestone, and exposed 

sandstone bluffs.

Flowering time:

 Recorded as flowering from August 

to January.

Essential oils:

  The leaf oil of this species was 

monoterpenoid in nature. The principal monoterpene 

was 1,8­cineole (34.3%) and this was accompanied by 

lesser amounts of a­pinene (4.2%), b­pinene (8.2%), 

limonene (1.4%), linalool (2.8%) and a­terpineol (4.7%). 

The principal sesquiterpenes encountered in the oil were 

globulol (6.0%), spathulenol (9.1%), viridiflorol (3.2%) and 

bicyclogermacrene (3.1%).



Oil yield:

 The oil yield (fresh weight, w/w) was <0.1%.

Melaleuca 

campanae

Craven


111

7. Species ac

counts

 —

Melaleuc



a c

ampt

oclada

Publication:

 in Cowley, Quinn, Barlow & Craven, 

Australian Systematic Botany 3: 199, fig. 14c (1990)



Derivation:

 camptoclada, from the Greek kampto, bend, 

curve, and klados, branch, stem, in reference to the habit 

of this species



Description:

 

Shrub 

1.5–3 m tall. 



Branchlets 

glabrous to 

glabrescent, sparsely puberulous when hairy. 

Leaves 

alter­


nate (sometimes in part subternate), 2.9–5.5 mm long, 

1.5–1.8 mm wide, 2–4 times as long as wide, subsessile; 

blade glabrous to glabrescent, sparsely puberulous when 

hairy, narrowly elliptic, elliptic or narrowly suboblong­

elliptic, in transverse section lunate or transversely linear

the base cuneate to rounded, the apex acute to rounded, 

the veins longitudinal, 3, 

oil glands 

moderately dense, 

distinct, scattered. 

Inflorescences 

spicate or capitate, 

lateral on secondary shoots and then pseudoterminal 

or interstitial, with 5–15 monads, up to 16 mm wide. 



Hypanthium 

glabrous, 1–1.5 mm long. 



Calyx lobes 

abaxi­


ally glabrous, 0.5–0.8 mm long, scarious in a marginal 

band c. 0.1 mm wide. 



Petals 

deciduous, 1.5–2.4 mm long. 



Stamens 

9–16 per bundle; filaments mauve, 5.1–6.5 mm 

long, the bundle claw 2.2–3.5 mm long, 0.5–0.6 times as 

long as the filaments. 



Style 

c. 8 mm long. 



Ovules 

30–40 per 

locule. 

Fruit 

2.5–3.5 mm long, with sepaline teeth; cotyle­

dons planoconvex.

Natural occurrence:

 Western Australia: from the 

Stirling Range south to the Mount Barker district.



Ecology:

 Recorded as occurring in tall eucalypt wood­

land, on clay loam, and gravelly sandy loam.



Flowering time:

 Recorded as flowering from Septem­

ber to November.

Essential oils:

 This species gave a strongly monoterpe­

noid leaf oil. The principal components were 1,8­cineole 

(59.6%) and a­pinene (23.5%). Also present were lesser 

amounts of b­pinene (2.1%), myrcene (1.8%) and limonene 

(6.7%). The major sesquiterpenes encountered were glob­

ulol (0.9%), viridiflorol (0.4%) and spathulenol (0.3%), 

though sesquiterpenes, in total, accounted for less than 

5% of the oil.



Oil yield:

 The oil yield (fresh weight, w/w) was 0.6%.



Melaleuca 

camptoclada

F.C.Quinn



112

Melaleuc

a c

apit

at

a

 7



. Species ac

counts


Publication:

 Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Soci-

ety of New South Wales 58: 194 (1924)



Derivation:

 capitata, from the Latin, caput, head, in 

reference to the shape of the inflorescence

Description:

 

Shrub 

0.8–2.5 m tall. 



Branchlets 

glabres­


cent, sericeous to pubescent. 

Leaves 

alternate, 10–25 mm 

long, 1–3 mm wide, 6–20 times as long as wide, short­

petiolate; blade glabrescent, sericeous to pubescent, very 

narrowly elliptic to linear­elliptic, in transverse sec­

tion transversely linear, the base narrowly cuneate, the 

apex narrowly acute to acute, the veins longitudinal, 3, 

oil glands 

moderately dense, obscure, scattered or in rows. 



Inflorescences 

capitate or shortly spicate, pseudoterminal, 

with 3–15 monads, up to 35 mm wide. 

Hypanthium 

hairy, 


4–5 mm long. 

Calyx lobes 

abaxially hairy, 1.4–2.3 mm long, 

herbaceous to the margin. 

Petals 

deciduous, 3–3.5 mm 

long. 

Stamens 

14–33 per bundle; filaments cream or rarely 

yellow, 6–10 mm long, the bundle claw 1.2–2(–3) mm long, 

0.2–0.3 times as long as the filaments. 



Style 

10–14.5 mm 

long. 

Ovules 

90–120 per locule. 



Fruit 

5–7 mm long, the 

calyx lobes deciduous (sometimes the extreme basal por­

tion of the lobes may become woody and persist as a more 

or less prominent ring around the aperture); cotyledons 

obvolute.



Natural occurrence:

 New South Wales: from the 

Bundanoon district south to the Braidwood district.



Ecology:

 Recorded as occurring in low eucalypt wood­

land, heathland, open eucalypt forest, on sandy loam, sand, 

and skeletal soil on sandstone.

Flowering time:

 Recorded as flowering from October 

to December.

Essential oils:

 The leaf oil of this species was domi­

nated by a­pinene (77–83%). There were lesser amounts of 

the monoterpenes limonene (1–2%), linalool (0.4–2.0%), 

a­terpineol (2–4%), geranyl acetate (0.6–2.0%) and geran­

iol (0.5–2.0%). Sesquiterpenes did not contribute much to 

the oil. The principal members were globulol (0.5–1.0%), 

spathulenol (1–2%) and a­, b­ and g­eudesmol (each 

0.1–0.4%).



Oil yield:

 The oil yield (fresh weight, w/w) was <0.1%.

Notes:

 This species has potential as an ornamental shrub 

in temperate climates in Australia.

Melaleuca 

capitata

Cheel


113

7. Species ac

counts

 —

Melaleuc



a c

ar

dioph

ylla

Publication:

 Fragmenta phytographiae Australiae 1: 225 

(1859)


Derivation:

 cardiophylla, from the Greek cardio­, heart, 

and ­phyllus, leaved, in reference to the shape of the leaf 

blade

Description:

 

Shrub 

0.2–3.5 m tall. 



Branchlets 

hairy or 

glabrous (when present, the hairs puberulous, velutinu­

lous or lanuginulose, sometimes also with much longer 

lanuginose to pubescent hairs). 

Leaves 

alternate, peltate 

(sometimes indistinctly so), 2–8.5 mm long, 1.75–6.5 mm 

wide, 1.1–1.8 times as long as wide, sessile; blade hairy to 

glabrescent, velutinulous to lanuginulose and sometimes 

also with pubescent to lanuginose hairs on the proxi­

mal central region, ovate, broadly ovate, subcircular or 

broadly elliptic, in transverse section transversely linear 

or strongly sublunate, the base cuneate to truncate, the 

apex acuminate or acute, the veins longitudinal, c. 12–20, 



oil glands 

moderately dense, distinct to obscure, more 

or less in rows. 

Inflorescences 

capitate, lateral and rarely 

with a distal leafy axis, with 1–5 monads, up to 25 mm 

wide. 


Hypanthium 

glabrous or hairy, 2.7–3.5 mm long. 



Calyx lobes 

abaxially glabrous or hairy; costate, 1.5–

2.2 mm long, scarious in a marginal band 0.3–0.4 mm wide. 

Petals 

deciduous, 3.5–4.4 mm long. 



Stamens 

c. 40–80 per 

bundle; filaments white or cream, 6.5–8.5 mm long, the 

bundle claw 5–6.5 mm long, 0.8–0.9 times as long as the 

filaments. 

Style 

4.5–5.5 mm long. 



Ovules 

40–65 per locule. 



Fruit 

5–7 mm long, with sepaline teeth; cotyledons obvolute.



Natural occurrence:

 Western Australia: from the 

Exmouth district south to the Perth district.



Ecology:

 Recorded as occurring in coastal heath, mal­

lee–spinifex community, scrubland, on limestone ridges, 

sand, clay depression in limestone soil, and salt pans.

Flowering time:

 Recorded as flowering from August 

to January.

Essential oils:

 The leaf oil of this species was com­

posed of a mixture of mono­ and sesquiterpenes, with 

monoterpenes predominating. The major monoterpenes 

were a­pinene (3–9%), b­pinene (10–17%), limonene 

(2–6%), p­cymene (2–3%), E­b­ocimene (1–4%), myrcene 

(1–3%), terpinen­4­ol (1–2%) and a­terpineol (1–2%). 

The principal sesquiterpenes were globulol (8–10%), 

viridiflorol (4–6%) and spathulenol (3–7%), with lesser 

amounts of aromadendrene (0.4–2%), allo­aromadendrene 

(1–2%), viridiflorene (2–4%), bicyclogermacrene (1–4%), 

d­cadinene (1–2%), cubeban­11­ol (3–6%) and a­cadinol 

(1–3%).


Oil yield:

 The oil yield (dry weight, w/w) was <0.2%.

Reference on essential oils: 

Brophy and Doran 1996



Melaleuca 

cardiophylla

F.Muell.


114

Melaleuc

a c

arrii

 —

 7



. Species ac

counts


Publication:

 in Craven & Lepschi, Australian Systematic 

Botany 12: 867 (1999)



Derivation:

 carrii, in honour of Denis John Carr 

(1915–2008), a developmental biologist and taxonomist 

at the Australian National University, Canberra, who took 

a special interest in the anatomy and development of Euca-

lyptus, another genus of Myrtaceae



Description:

 

Shrub 

0.3–2 m tall; bark fissured, fibrous. 



Branchlets 

glabrescent or glabrous (when present, the 

hairs pubescent grading to lanuginose­pubescent to, occa­

sionally, lanuginose as well). 



Leaves 

alternate, 6.5–27 mm 

long, (0.5–)0.6–1.1(–1.6) mm wide, 6–30 times as long 

as wide, sessile to subsessile; blade glabrescent or gla­

brous (when present, the hairs pubescent, occasionally 

approaching more or less sericeous­pubescent, and often 

grading to lanuginose­pubescent distally), linear, linear­

obovate or very narrowly obovate, in transverse section 

subcircular to transversely elliptic, circular or depressed 

obovate, the base truncate or parallel (blade width equals 

petiole width), the apex acuminate or acute to obtuse, 

the veins longitudinal, 3, 



oil glands 

dense or moderately 

so, obscure to distinct, scattered. 

Inflorescences 

capitate, 

pseudoterminal and sometimes also upper axillary, with 

5–12 triads, up to 18 mm wide. 



Hypanthium 

hairy or 

rarely glabrous (including the ovary), 1–1.5 mm long. 

Calyx lobes 

abaxially glabrescent or hairy, rarely glabrous, 

0.2–0.5 mm long, herbaceous to the margin or scarious 

in a marginal band 0–0.2 mm wide. 



Petals 

deciduous, 

0.7–1.5 mm long. 

Stamens 

4–6 per bundle; filaments 

mauve to purple, pink or magenta, 4–7.5 mm long, the 

bundle claw 0.5–2.5 mm long, 0.1–0.4 times as long as the 

filaments. 

Style 

5–7 mm long. 



Ovules 

c. 8–15 per locule. 



Infructescences 

globose. 



Fruit 

2–3 mm long, the calyx 

lobes weathering away or replaced by weakly developed 

sepaline teeth; cotyledons obvolute.



Natural occurrence:

 Western Australia: from the 

Eneabba – Three Springs district south to the Jerramun­

gup–Esperance district.

Melaleuca 

carrii

Craven


7. Species ac

counts


 —

Melaleuc



a c

arrii

115


7. Species ac

counts — 



Melaleuc

a c

arrii 

(c

on



tinued

)

Ecology:



 Recorded as occurring in heathland, open 

shrubland, low mallee woodland with heath understorey, 

swampy area on edge of open sedgeland, on sand over clay, 

lateritic loam, and loamy clay over granite.



Flowering time:

 Recorded as flowering from April to 

November.

Essential oils:

 The oil from this species was monoter­

penoid in character, though within this type it was 

variable. The principal components of the oil, from col­

lection BJL 1708, were 1,8­cineole (11–36%), myrtenol 

(2–32%) and a­pinene (14–68%), with lesser amounts 

of a­terpineol (1–3%) and b­pinene (1–4%). A second 

collection, BJL 1701, contained 1,8­cineole (59.6%), 

a­pinene (8.9%), b­pinene (5.7%), limonene (9.7%) and 

a­terpineol (3.2%) as main components. Sesquiterpenes, 

in both collections, did not contribute much to the oil, 

with globulol (1%) being the main component in both 

collections.



Oil yield:

 The oil yield in both collections (fresh weight, 

w/w) was 0.7–0.8%.



Notes:

 This species is widespread in south­western Aus­

tralia and was previously often confused with the typically 

coastal species, M. pentagona. Melaleuca carrii has decidu­

ous petals and ungrooved leaves whereas M. pentagona 

has caducous petals and grooved leaves. Because of its 

wide geographical range, there is potential for selecting 

genotypes that would be successful for use as ornamental 

shrubs in areas with a Mediterranean climate.


116

Melaleuc

a cheelii

 —

 7



. Species ac

counts


Publication:

 Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queens-

land 43: 16, t. 2 (1931)



Derivation:

 cheelii, in honour of Edwin Cheel (1872–

1951), a botanist at the state herbarium in Sydney, Australia

Description:

 

Tree or shrub 

2–10 m tall; bark papery. 



Branchlets 

glabrescent, lanuginulose­puberulous to 

lanuginulose or puberulous. 

Leaves 

decussate (occa­

sionally sub­opposite), 5–12.5 mm long, 2–6 mm wide, 

2–3 times as long as wide, subsessile to short­petiolate; 

blade glabrescent, lanuginulose to sericeous­lanuginulose 

and usually with some sericeous­pubescent to pubes­

cent hairs also, elliptic, narrowly elliptic or broadly 

elliptic, in transverse section transversely linear, the 

base cuneate, the apex acuminate or acute, the veins 

longitudinal, 3–5, 



oil glands 

dense, distinct to obscure, 

scattered. 

Inflorescences 

spicate, pseudoterminal, with 

2–10 monads (rarely in part are dyads present), up to 

20 mm wide. 



Hypanthium 

hairy or glabrescent, 2–2.5 mm 

long. 

Calyx lobes 

abaxially glabrescent, 0.8–1.5 mm long, 

herbaceous to the margin or rarely scarious in a marginal 

band 0–0.2 mm wide. 



Petals 

deciduous, 2–2.7 mm long. 



Stamens 

8–18 per bundle; filaments cream to white, 

6.5–8.3 mm long, the bundle claw 1.8–2.3 mm long, 

0.2–0.3 times as long as the filaments. 



Style 

10–12 mm 

long. 

Ovules 

c. 65–150 per locule. 



Fruit 

4–4.5 mm long, 

the calyx lobes weathering away; cotyledons obvolute.

Natural occurrence:

 Queensland: the Bundaberg 

district.



Ecology:

 Recorded as occurring in heathy Melaleuca 

swamp, and on sandy soil.



Flowering time:

 Recorded as flowering in September.



Essential oils:

 The leaf oil of this species was domi­

nated by a­pinene (83%). There were lesser amounts of 

isovaleraldehyde (1.2%), limonene (1.4%) and a­terpineol 

(2.2%). Sesquiterpenes did not contribute much to the oil, 

with the principal members being aromadendrene (1.2%), 

bicyclogermacrene (1.1%), globulol (1.2%), viridiflorol 

(0.7%) and spathulenol (0.5%).

Oil yield:

 The oil yield (fresh weight, w/w) was 0.5%.

Melaleuca 

cheelii

C.T.White



117

7. Species ac

counts

 —

Melaleuc



a chisholmii

Publication:

 Novon 16: 471 (2006)

Derivation:

 chisholmii, in honour of J.R. Chisholm who 

made plant collections in Queensland, Australia, including 

the type collection of this species



Synonym:

 Callistemon chisholmi Cheel



Description:

 

Shrub 

1.5–3 m tall; bark rough, dark 

grey. 

Branchlets 

glabrescent, lanuginose­sericeous over­

laid with pubescent hairs. 

Leaves 

alternate, 25–100 mm 

long, 1–7 mm wide, 9–60 times as long as wide, subses­

sile or short­petiolate; blade glabrescent, sericeous to 

lanuginose­sericeous, narrowly elliptic, narrowly obovate, 

linear­elliptic or linear­obovate, in transverse section 

transversely linear to sublunate to broadly subreniform, 

the base very narrowly cuneate to parallel (blade width 

equals petiole width), the apex acute or very shortly 

acuminate, the veins pinnate or longitudinal, when 

pinnate with up to 30 veins, 3­veined when longitudinal­

veined only, 



oil glands 

moderately dense, distinct or 

obscure, scattered. 

Inflorescences 

spicate, pseudoter­

minal or effectively so, with 10–30 monads, 40–50 mm 

wide. 


Hypanthium 

hairy or glabrous, 2.6–4.4 mm long. 



Calyx lobes 

abaxially hairy (sometimes on the margin 

only), 1.1–1.7 mm long, scarious in a marginal band 

0.3–0.7 mm wide. 




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