The scaly-leaved featherflower



Yüklə 0,98 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü0,98 Mb.

The scaly-leaved featherflower 

(Verticordia spicata subsp. squamosa

is an attractive compact shrub to 1.5 

metres tall and one metre wide, with 

rounded to elliptic-shaped leaves, each 

of which has prominent oil glands. 

It produces masses of pinkish-white 

feathery flowers at the ends of its 

branches during late spring and early 

summer (October to December).



Verticordia spicata subsp. squamosa 

differs from Verticordia spicata subsp. 



spicata in its smaller flowers and leaves.

The subspecies is found growing in 

deep yellow sand in low scrub among 

open mallee.

It was first found east of Three  

Springs in 1974. Since then only nine, 

mostly small populations have been 

located. 

Scaly-leaved featherflower was ranked 

as critically endangered in 1995. 

DEC has set up the Moora and 

Geraldton districts threatened flora 

recovery teams to coordinate recovery 

actions addressing the most threatening 

processes affecting the species’ survival 

in the wild (see overleaf).

Only a few small populations of  

this attractive featherflower are known 

and DEC is keen to know of any  

others.


If unable to contact the district offices 

on the above numbers, please phone 

DEC’s Species and Communities Branch 

on (08) 9334 0455.



Scaly-leaved featherflower

E

n



d

a

n



g

e

r



e

d

 



f

l

o



r

a

 



o

f

 



W

e

s



t

e

r



n

 

A



u

s

t



r

a

l



i

a

Recovery of a species



DEC is committed to ensuring that critically endangered taxa do not become 

extinct in the wild. This is done through the preparation of a Recovery Plan or 

Interim Recovery Plan (IRP), which outline the recovery actions that are required to 

urgently address those threatening processes most affecting the ongoing survival 

of the threatened species in the wild and begin the recovery process.

IRPs are prepared by DEC and implemented by regional or district recovery teams 

consisting of representatives from DEC, Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority, 

community groups, private landowners, local shires and various government 

organisations.

If you think you’ve seen this plant, please call the Department of 

Environment and Conservation’s (DEC’s) Moora District  

on (08) 9652 1911 or Geraldton District on (08) 9921 5955.

Pink flowers of the scaly-leaved featherflower. Photo – Gemma Phelan

The leaves are a rounded shape and masses 

of flowers are produced at the end of the 

branches. Photo – Gemma Phelan


2008025-0608-500

Scaly-leaved featherflower

E

n



d

a

n



g

e

r



e

d

 



f

l

o



r

a

 



o

f

 



W

e

s



t

e

r



n

 

A



u

s

t



r

a

l



i

a

Recovery actions that 



have been, and will be, 

progressively implemented to 

protect the species include:

Protection from current threats:  

installation of rare flora markers to 

demarcate roadside populations; 

control of introduced weeds; rabbit 

control; erection of fences to exclude 

stock; undertaking smokewater 

and disturbance trials to stimulate 

germination; watering of both 

natural and translocated populations 

in drought years; development of 

a fire protection plan; and regular 

monitoring of the health of each 

population.

Protection from future threats:  

conducting further surveys; 

rehabilitation of areas in and 

around populations of scaly-leaved 

featherflower; collection and storage 

of seed in DEC’s Threatened Flora 

Seed Centre; maintenance of live 

plants away from the wild (i.e. in 

botanical gardens); researching the 

biology and ecology of the scaly-

leaved featherflower; and enhancing 

plant numbers by removal of weeds, 

amelioration of some other limiting 

factor, or by direct propagation and 

translocation techniques. Other 

actions include ensuring that relevant 

authorities, landowners and DEC staff 

are aware of the species’ presence 

and the need to protect it, and that 

all are familiar with the threatening 

processes identified in the Interim 

Recovery Plan.

IRPs will be deemed a success if the 

number of individuals within the 

population and/or the number of 

populations have increased.

This project is funded by the 

Australian and State governments’ 

investment through the Natural 

Heritage Trust, administered in the 

Midwest Region by the Northern 

Agricultural Catchments Council.



Scaly-leaved featherflower. Photo – Benson Todd

Top: A plant in full flower in early January. Photo – Anne Cochrane

Above: Seed gathering. Photo – DEC


Yüklə 0,98 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə