Theme Shigellae infections. Salmonellae infections. Escherichia infections. Yersiniosis. Rotaviral infection Theme Viral hepatitis A, B, С, d et al. Gastrointestinal infections: guidance, data and analysis



Yüklə 3,37 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/6
tarix14.04.2020
ölçüsü3,37 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6

Lesson 14 

 

Theme 1. Shigellae infections. Salmonellae infections. Escherichia infections. Yersiniosis. Rotaviral 

infection 

Theme 2. Viral hepatitis A, B, С, D et al. 

Gastrointestinal infections: guidance, data and analysis

 

Escherichia coli (E. coli): guidance, data and analysis

 

Shigella: guidance, data and analysis

 

Salmonella: guidance, data and analysis

 

Rotavirus: guidance, data and analysis

 

Yersiniosis - Protocol - Government of Manitoba



 

Hepatitis A: guidance, data and analysis

 

Hepatitis B: guidance, data and analysis

 

Hepatitis C: guidance, data and analysis

 

Hepatitis E: guidance, data and analysis

 


 

 

 

 

 



 

SHIGELLA 



Shigella  infections  (dysenteries)  are  acute  human  Infectious  Diseases  with  fecal-

oral  transmitting  that  are  characterized  by  colitic  syndrome  and  symptoms  of  general 

intoxication, quite often with development of primary neurotoxicosis. 

Etiology: Shigella organisms  are a group of gram-negative, facultative intracellular 

pathogens.  These  organisms  are  members  of  the  family  Enterobacteriaceae  and  tribe 

Escherichieae;  they  are  grouped  into  4  species: Shigella  dysenteriae,  Shigella  flexneri, 

Shigella  boydii, and Shigella  sonnei, also  known  as  groups  A,  B,  C,  and  D, 

respectively.

 

They  are  nonmotile,  non  –  spore  forming,  rod  shaped,  and 



nonencapsulated, produce endotoxin, are resistant to the environment (in milk, water, food 

stays for several days, in soil - for several weeks), are stable to the freezing, but sensitive for 

boiling. Subgroups and serotypes are differentiated from each other by their biochemical 

characteristics  (e.g.,  ability  to  ferment  D-mannitol)  and  antigenic  properties. Group  A 

has 15 serotypes, group B has 8 serotypes, group C has 19 serotypes, and group D has 1 

serotype.  

Geographic distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility varies with different species. S 

dysenteriae serotype  1  causes  deadly  epidemics, S  boydii is  restricted  to  the  Indian 

subcontinent,  and S  flexneri and S  sonnei are  prevalent  in  developing  and  developed 

countries, respectively. S flexneri, enteroinvasive gram-negative bacteria, is responsible 

for the worldwide endemic form of bacillary dysentery.  

  

 

 

Epidemiology: Source of infection

• 

Contagious patient 



• 

Bacillus carrier 

The disease is communicable as long as an infected person excretes the organism in the 

stool, which can extend as long as 4 weeks from the onset of illness. Bacterial shedding 

usually  ceases  within  4  weeks  of  the  onset  of  illness;  rarely,  it  can  persist  for  months. 

Appropriate antimicrobial treatment can reduce the duration of carriage to a few days.  



Shigella is spread through fecal-oral mechanism of transmitting. 

The way of transmitting 

• 

Contact 



• 

Alimentary 

• 

Watery 


Vectors  like  the  housefly  can  spread  the  disease  by  physically  transporting  infected 

feces. 


Susceptibility: 60-70 % especially infants and preschoolers. The infectivity dose (ID) is 

extremely  low.  As  few  as  10 S  dysenteriae bacilli  can  cause  clinical  disease,  whereas 

100-200 bacilli are needed for S sonneior S flexneri infection. 

Seasonality is summer-autumn. 


Pathogenesis:  Shigella bacteria  invade  the  intestinal  epithelium  through  M  cells  and 

proceed to spread from cell to cell, causing death and sloughing of contiguously invaded 

epithelial  cells  and  inducing  a  potent  inflammatory  response  resulting  in  the 

characteristic dysentery syndrome. In addition to this series of pathogenic events, only S 

dysenteriae type 1 has the ability to elaborate the potent Shiga toxin that inhibits protein 

synthesis  in  eukaryotic  cells  and  that  may  lead  to  extraintestinal  complications, 

including  hemolytic-uremic  syndrome  and  death.  Invasion  of  M  cells,  the  specialized 

cells that cover the lymphoid follicles of the  mucosa, overlying Peyer patches,  may be 

the earliest event. 

Schematically: 

1. 


Entering Shigella to gastrointestinal tract. 

2. 


Destruction of them under the influence of enzymes. 

3. 


Toxemia. 

4. 


Toxic changes in organs and systems (especially in  CNS). 

5. 


Local inflammatory process (due to colonizing of distal part of the colon). 

6. 


Diarrhea. 

 

 



 

Morphological changes in shigellosis 

Classification 

I. 

Clinical  Form 



Typical 

• 

With dominance of toxicosis 



• 

With dominance of local inflammation 

• 

Mixed 


Atypical 

• 

Effaced 



• 

Dyspeptic 

• 

Subclinical 



• 

Hypertoxic 



II. 

Severity (mild, moderate and severe) 

III. 

Course 


• 

Acute (up to 1.5  mo) 

• 

Subacute (up to 3 mo) 



• 

Chronic (about 3 mo) 

recurrent 



constantly recurring 



IV. 

Presence of complications 

• 

uncomplicated 



• 

complicated 



V. 

Bacillus  carrying 



Clinical criteria (typical form with dominance of  toxicosis): 

• The incubation period varies from 12 hours to 7 days but is typically 2-4 days; the 

incubation period is inversely proportional to the load of ingested bacteria.  

• Toxic signs occur primarely (febrile temperature 39-40 °C, lose of appetite, 

vomiting, headache, fatigue) even may develope neurotoxicosis (hallucinations, 

unconsciousness, seizures). 

• Colitis is secondary (abdominal pain, tenesmus, false urge to defecate, sigmoid colon 

is tender, spastic, anus is open in severe cases. Feces in the form of a spit of mucus 

and blood (rectal spit), defecation are multiple). 

• Dehydration is not typical (except infants). 



 

 

Marble skin in toxicosis 

 

Clinical criteria (typical form with dominance of local inflammation

• 

Sudden onset from high-grade fever. 



• 

Abdominal cramping. 

• 

Sbdominal pain. 



• 

Tenesmus. 

• 

A large-volume, initially watery diarrhea with mucus, cylindrical epithelial cells   



• 

Later  develops  incontinence  of  feces,  and  mucoid  diarrhea  with  frank  blood  as  a 

rectal spit. 

 

 



False urge to defecate 

 

 

 

Typical color of feces in shigellosis, rectal spit 

 

 

Sunken abdomen 

 

 

Rectal prolapse 

 

Peculiarities of Shigella infection in infants: 

• 

Acute beginning with slow development of signs and symptoms (for 3-5 days). 



• 

Distal colitis is less common. 

• 

Enterocolitis is more common, hemocolitis is rare. 



• 

Hepato- and  splenomegaly. 

• 

Crying, anxiety, red face during defecation are equivalent to tenesmus. 



• 

Always gaping anus, sphincteritis occurs. 

• 

Dehydration is more  common. 



• 

Course of the disease is prolongated. 

 

Criteria of the Shigella infection Severity 

Mild form 

• 

Subacute or acute onset of  diarrhea 



• 

Stool 5-8 times daily with mucus and blood 

• 

Temporary pain in abdominal region 



• 

The temperature is normal or low febrile 

• 

Loss of appetite 



• 

Vomiting may occur 

Moderate form 

• 

Acute onset of diarrhea 



• 

Symptoms of toxicosis 

• 

The temperature is 38-39 °C 



• 

Anorexia 

• 

Crampy abdominal pain 



• 

Stool is 10-15 times daily 

• 

Pain during palpation in left inguinal region 



• 

Hepatomegaly 



Severe form 

• 

Multiple vomiting with bile, sometimes – as coffee lees, not only after meal, but 



also independently. 

• 

Defecation  more  than  15  times  daily,  sometimes  –  with  each  diaper,  much 



mucus, blood, sometimes an intestinal bleeding developes. 

• 

General condition is severely  worsened. 



• 

Quite often – sopor, loss of consciousness, seizures. 

• 

Changes in all organs and  systems. 



• 

Severe toxicosis, dehydration (in infants). 

• 

Significant weight loss. 



 

Laboratory tests: 

o  The white blood cell count: is often within reference range, with a high percentage of 

bands. Occasionally, leucopenia or leukemic reactions may be detected. 

o  In HUS: anemia and thrombocytopenia  occur. 

o  Stool  examination:  fecal  blood  or  leukocytes,  mucus,  cylindrical  epithelial  cells 

(confirming colitis) are detectable. 

o  Stool culture: Specimens should be plated lightly onto Endo-Levin, Ploskirev, McConkey, 

xylose-lysine-deoxycholate, or eosin-methylene blue agars. 

o  Blood  culture:  should  be  obtained  in  children  who  appear  toxic,  very  young, 

severely  ill,  malnourished,  or  immunocompromised  because  of  their  increased  risk 

of bacteremia. 

o  Serological test: (AT, PHA in dynamics with 4-fold titer increasing in 10-14 days) in 

children elder than 1 year if fecal culture is  negative. 

o  Enzyme  immunoassay:  An  enzyme  immunoassay  for  Stx  is  used  to  detect 



dysenteriae type 1 in the stool. 

o  Rapid techniques: With rapid techniques, gene probes or polymerase chain reaction 

(PCR) primers are directed toward virulence genes (invasion plasmid locus). 

 

 

• 

Shigella  infection  (Sh.  sonnei),  typical  form  (with  dominance  of  toxicosis), 



severe degree, acute  course, uncomplicated. 

• 

Shigella  infection  (Sh.  flexneri),  typical  form  (with  dominance  of  local 



inflammation), moderate degree, constantly recurring course,  complicated by 

the rectum prolapse. 

Differential  diagnosis  should  be  performed  with:  Salmonella  infection, 

Escherichiosis,  Acute  appendicitis,  Intestinal  intussusception,  Krohn’s  disease, 

Nonspecific necrotizing colitis. 

 

Differential-Diagnostic Criteria of Diarrheal Diseases 



Criteria 

Functional 

Diarrhea 

Salmonella infection 

Shigella infection 

Epidemi

o- 

logical 

anamne

sis 

Sporadic diseases 

on the background 

of wrong feeding, 

care, etc. 

More often a group 

illness, connected with 

source of infection 

(products, contact with ill 

person or carrier of 

salmonellas) 

Both a sporadic, or a 

group illness, contact 

with ill person, 

connection with 

infected products 



Etiology 

Enzymopathy or 

motor function 

disability 

Salmonella 

Shigella 



Fever 

subfebrile (2-3 days), 

or normal 

7 days and more  

5-7 days and more 

Toxicosis 

Not typical 

Moderate or severe, 5-7 

days, prevails on 

diarrhea 

Mild to severe for 3-7 

days, precedes 

intestinal 

manifestations 

Dehydration 

mild, or 

absent 

Moderate or severe, long- 



lasting 

Only in infants 



Course 

2-3 days 

7-30 days 

7 and more days 



Feces 

Looks like 

chopped eggs, 

liquid 


Dark-green with mucus 

(as mud), with blood 

Big amount of 

mucus, sometimes – 

blood and 

pus – rectal spit 



Vomiting 

Short (1-2 days), or 

absent 

Moderate and long-lasting 



(5-7 

days) 


Severe, but is not long 

  

Metheoris





(abdomin

al 

distension) 

Mild, short (1-2 

days) 

Always is present, long- 



lasting 

Abdomen is sunken 



Koprogram 

Typical for 

enzymopathy 

Mainly enzymopathy or 

Inflammatory changes 

Inflammatory changes 



Liver 

Is not enlarged 

Is enlarged 

Can be enlarged 



Spleen 

Is not enlarged 

Is enlarged 

Is not enlarged 



Criteria 

Escherichiosis 

Staphylococcal 

enterocolitis 

Viral diarrhea 

Epidemi

o- 

logical 

anamne

sis 

Sporadic diseases 

of infants, mainly  

hospital infeection, 

contact with ill 

person 


Sporadic diseases of 

infants on a background of 

Staphylococcal infection of 

other organs, or 

Staphylococcal infection of 

the mother 

Group, or sporadic 

illness, with possble 

catarr of the upper 

respiratory tract 

 


Etiology 

Pathogenic Escherichia 

Staphylococci 

Viruses (Rotavirus,etc.)  



Fever  

Is long-lasting (7-14 days), 

quite often – undulant 

Long-lasting subfebrile 

(for weeks, months) 

3-5 days  

– high 

Toxicosis 

Moderate, not less than 7 

days, prevails over 

dyspeptic phenomena 

Mild, long-lasting 

(weeks, months) 

Moderate, 3-5 days 

Dehydration 

Often severe, long- 

lasting 

Absent, or mild 

Typical, severe 

Course  

7-30 days 

Weeks, months 

5-7 days 



Feces 

Not too frequent, colorless 

or brightly yellow, 

liquid, in a big amount 

Not too frequent, yellow, 

sometimes 

– with blood 

Watery (yellow, or rice- 

water), frequent 

Vomiting 

Moderate and long-lasting 

(5-7 days) 

Is absent 

Short (1-3 days), 

moderate 



Metheorism 

(abdominal 

distension) 

Severe, long-lasting 

Mild, 

but 


long-

lastin


Moderate, short (1-2 

days) 

Koprogram 

Enzymopathy or 

inflammatory changes 

Inflammatory changes 

Enzymopathy is 

possible 



Liver 

Is enlarged 

Is enlarged 

Is not enlarged 



Spleen 

Is not enlarged 

More often is enlarged  Is not enlarged 

 

Treatment: see treatment of Shigella infection below 

 

Prophylaxis 

• 

Water and food epidemiologic control. 



• 

Isolation and sanitation of ill person. 

• 

Convalescent  may  be  discharged  from  the  hospital  after  one  negative  feces 



culture (taken 2 days after the course of antibiotic  therapy is finished). 

• 

Dispensary supervision of convalescents for 1-3 months. 



• 

Feces culture taken in contacted and carriers. 

• 

Supervision of contacted for 7 days, quarantine. 



• 

Disinfection of the focus of infection. 

 

Key  words and  phrases: Shigella  infection,  acute,  chronic,  prolongated,  relapsed  course,  tenesmus,  false 

urge to defecate, gaping anus, spit of mucus and blood (rectal spit), sphincteritis. 

 

SALMONELLA INFECTIONS 



 Salmonella  infection  is  an  acute  infectious  disease  of  humans  and  animals  that  is  caused  by  the 

numerous  strains  of  Salmonella  and  more  frequent  courses  as  gastro-intestinal,  rare  –  as  typhoid  and 

septic forms. 

Etiology:  Salmonella,  over  2000  strains,  Gramm-negative  movable  bacili,  that  don’t 

form capsules and spores. Their main antigents are O-, H-, and Vi-, by O-antigen they are 

devided on groups (A, B, C, D, E, F etc.). Most often Salmonella infection is caused by: 

•  S.  typhimurium 

•  S.  enteritidis 

•  S.  java 

•  S. anatum and other 

Bacteria are stable in the environment (for months and years they live in food, water, 

soil), hot temperature kill them in 1 hour. 


 

Epidemiology: 

• 

Source of infection: ill person, carrier, ill animals and  birds 

• 

Way of transmitting – alimentary or by water; by direct contact, rare air-droplet 

• 

Susceptible organism: children, especially before 2 years old 

The  transmitting  of  salmonellae  to  a  susceptible  host  usually  occurs  via 

consumption of contaminated foods. The most common sources of salmonellae include 

beef,  poultry,  and  eggs.  Improperly  prepared  fruits,  vegetables,  dairy  products,  and 

shellfish  have  also  been  implicated  as  sources  of Salmonella.  In  addition,  human-to-

human  and  animal-to-human  transmittings  can  occur  from  amphibian  and  reptile 

chicks, ducklings, kittens, pet rodents, and hedgehogs.

  

  

Pathogenesis 



The extension of the disease to various organs depends on the serotype, the size of 

the  inoculum,  and  the  status  of  the  host.  If  large  enough  numbers  of  bacteria  are 

ingested,  they  can  survive  in  the  normally  lethal  acidic  pH  of  the  stomach.  Once 

ingested, Salmonella can  gain  access  to  the  small  intestine,  producing  diffuse  mucosal 

inflammation,  edema,  and  microabscesses.  Generally,  most  nontyphoidal Salmonella 

(NTS) do not extend beyond the lamina propria and lymphatics of the gut. Exceptions 

include Salmonella  choleraesuis  and Salmonella  dublin, which  can  cause  bacteremia 

with  little  intestinal  involvement.

 

In  individuals  with S.  typhi, areas  of  intestinal 



necrosis  can  ulcerate  and  result  in  perforation.  In  addition,  this  mucosal  penetration 

allows  uptake  into  the  draining  lymph  nodes,  contributing  to  blood  stream  infections 

(BSI)  and  subsequent  invasion  of  the  liver,  spleen,  and  bone  marrow.  This  process 

explains the delayed onset of symptoms in S.typhi. 

 

 

 



Schematically: 

1.  Massive entering of bacteria to the alimentary  canal. 

2.  Destruction of salmonella in the upper parts of gastrointestinal tract. 

3.  Toxemia   vomiting (as a protective factor). 

4.  Entering of other bacteria into small intestinum, colon, and colonization of 

epitheliocytes. 

5.  Local inflammatory process, dysperistalsis, development of indigestion and 

malabsorption, accumulation of biologically active substances, which impare 

absorption of water, electrolytes (diarrhea, dehydration). 

6.  Affection of the intestinal, lymphatic barriers (septic form of  Salmonella 



infection). 

7.  Bacteriemia. 

8.  Forming of septic foci. 

Classification 

1. 


Local form 

• 

Gastrointestinal form 



• 

Bacillus carrying 

2. 

Generalized form 



• 

Typhoid fever-like form 

• 

Sepsis 


3. 

Asymptomatic form 



II. 

Severity (mild, moderate and severe) 

 


II. 

Course 


• 

Acute (up to 1.5  mo) 

• 

Subacute (up to 3 mo) 



• 

Chronic (more than 3 mo) 



III. 

Presence of complications 

• 

uncomplicated 



• 

complicated 



IV. 

Bacillus  carrying 



 

Clinical diagnostic criteria 

Of local gastro-intestinal forms: 

• 

period of incubation: hours (for gastritis)  – several days  (in case of transmitting 

by direct  contact); 

• 

acute beginning from:  

• 

intoxication (nausea, vomiting, high body temperature, headache); 



• abdominal pain; 

• diarrhea,  usually  appears  secondary,  stools  are  “muddy”  (Pic.  201),  may  be 

with blood and mucus (Pic. 202), abdomen is tender; dehydration is moderate. 

 

 

 

 “Muddy” stools, hemocolitis 

 

Typhoid form: 



• 

acute beginning from high temperature (39-40°C) lasting for 1-2 weeks; 

• 

vomiting, hallucinations; 



• 

“typhoid” tongue; 

• 

hepato-, splenomegaly from the 5-6



th

 day of the  disease; 

• 

skin rashes (roseols) on the trunk on 8-10



th

 day; 


• 

diarrhea; 

• 

tenderness in the right inguinal region of  abdomen. 



Septic form: 

•  Incubation period is long (5-10 days) 

•  usually  occurs  in  newborns,  infants  with  predisposal  factors  (malnutrition,  rickets 

etc.); 


• is caused by antibiotic resistant, nosocomeal strains of Salmonella; 

•  is transmitted by a direct contact with infected material

•  acute beginning from fever that becomes hectic; 

• septic foci: meningitis, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, pyelonephritis, enterocolitis; 

•  hepatosplenomegaly; 

•  hemorrhagic syndrome; 

• development of toxic-dystrophic  syndrome; 

•  relapses; 

• prolonged course, bacillus carrying; 


• high mortality. 

 

Salmonella infection in newborns 

• generalized form, high lethality are typical; 

• the mechanism of transmitting is contact (through nursery  facilities); 

• the source of infection: infected mothers, personnel of the hospital; 

• agent: hospital strains of Salmonella; 

• high resistance to antibiotics; 

• latent period is prolonged (up to 5-10 days); 

• gradual beginning with growth of clinical symptoms; 

• severe and prolong intoxication; 

 


• prolong course, formation of bacillus carrying, relapses of the disease

• development of a toxic-dystrophic syndrome. 



Laboratory tests 

• Complete  blood  count  with  differential:  CBC  count  is  often  10,000-15,000/μ  L  in 

simple gastroenteritis. Patients with typhoid form or sepsis commonly have anemia, 

thrombocytopenia, or neutropenia, although a shift to  more immature  forms can be 

seen on the differential count. 

•  Cultures:  Isolation  of  Salmonella  from  cultures  of  stool,  blood,  urine,  or  bone 

marrow  is  diagnostic.  Specimens  should  be  plated  lightly  onto  Endo-Lewin, 

Ploskirev, McConkey, xylose-lysine-deoxycholate, or eosin-methylene blue agars. 

•  Stool  examination:  Stool  may  be  hemoccult  positive  and  may  be  positive  for  fecal 

polymorphonuclear cells. 

•  Chemistry:  Electrolyte  tests  may  reveal  metabolic  acidosis  or  other  abnormalities 

consistent with dehydration. 

• 

Serologic tests: (AR, PHA in dynamics with 4-fold titer increasing in 10-14 days) 

in children elder than 1 year if fecal culture is  negative. 



Yüklə 3,37 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə