Toodyay Road Passing Lanes


Toodyay Road Passing Lanes



Yüklə 239,02 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/3
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü239,02 Kb.
1   2   3

Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

2.6 



Consultation 

Key Stakeholders identified during the PEIA and subsequent work include: 

 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (CALM) – John Forrest 



National Park 

 



Department of Environment (DoE) – Water catchments, clearing. 

 



City of Swan, Shire of Mundaring. 

 



Heritage Council of Western Australia – Convict Station. 

2.6.1 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (CALM) 

CALM was previously consulted regarding the area of construction just west of Passing 

Lane 1 and adjoining John Forrest National Park (GHD 2002).  No particular issues 

were raised with regard to the construction of that passing lane in terms of there being 

any particular aspects of conservation significance in the works area.  However, it was 

noted that a number of issues should be further investigated and considered in an 

EMP.  These were: 

 



Threatened flora – a survey should be carried out and the impacts on any 

species found should be detailed; 

 

Dieback – a detailed dieback management plan should be developed including 



a dieback survey by an expert dieback interpreter; 

 



Vegetation – clearing of vegetation should be minimised and rehabilitation of 

construction disturbance carried out where appropriate; 

 

Spoil removal – any spoil to be removed offsite to prevent potential weed and 



disease spread; 

 



Weed control – a weed management program should be developed; 

 



Drainage – any increased drainage should be maintained on site; 

 



Access – access to John Forest National Park should be maintained; and 

 



Fire management – should be considered if work is to occur during the wildfire 

season. 


CALM indicated in 2002 (Mr Keith Tressider, pers. comm.), that the area just west of 

(and downslope of) Passing Lane 1 is dieback free.   

It has also been indicated that there is a long-term requirement for CALM to provide 

public access to the park at the northern end of John Forrest National Park, but there 

are no plans for where this might occur. 

2.6.2 

Department of Environmental Protection (former) / Department of 

Environment 

Following the discussions with CALM about another passing lane just west of Passing 

Lane 1, the former Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) was consulted in 

2002 by MRWA and confirmed that, provided that the advice of CALM was followed, 

there would be no requirement to refer the Passing Lane 1 proposal to the EPA for 

assessment. 

16 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

From the above it can be assumed that referral of Passing Lane 1 and the other 



passing lanes to the EPA will not be required.  The DoE (Swan Goldfields Agricultural 

Region) were also contacted with regard to the need for a Permit to Disturb Bed or 

Bank for the impacts on minor waterways.  Bob Whittaker of this Region noted the 

small risk of sedimentation from roadworks and the possible impact on downstream 

landowners, particularly regarding water quality in dams.  Details of the proposal have 

been forwarded to the Region and MRWA should also provide the EMP to the DoE for 

future reference. 

2.6.3 

Heritage Council of Western Australia 

The Heritage Council of Western Australia was consulted by GHD in regards to 

Proposed Passing Lane 1 and its potential impact on the Redhill Convict Station.  The 

Heritage Council endorsed the Conservation Plan prepared for MRWA in 1998 by 

Heritage and Conservation Professionals.  However, recommendations made by the 

Heritage Council are only valid for a period of two years, and therefore there is a 

requirement to submit a Development Referral.  

17 


61/16642/53945     

Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

3. 



Potential Environmental, Cultural and Social 

Constraints or Impacts 

The most significant constraint to the construction of the passing lanes along Toodyay 

Road is the presence of the road reserve adjacent to John Forrest National Park at 

Red Hill (Passing Lane 1) and the loss of road reserve vegetation that will occur during 

the construction of the passing lanes.   

All relevant issues will be the subject of management requirements in the 

Environmental Management Plan for the project. 



3.1 

Biological Issues 

3.1.1 

Land Clearing  

New legislation under the Environmental Protection (Clearing of Native Vegetation) 



Regulations 2004, proclaimed on 8 July 2004, protects all native vegetation in Western 

Australia.  Under the new law, clearing native vegetation is prohibited, unless a 

clearing permit is granted by the DoE, or the clearing is for an exempt purpose.  These 

exemptions ensure that low impact day-to-day activities involving clearing or activities 

that are required under other laws can be undertaken without individual permits or 

activities.  Proponents that wish to clear are required to submit an application if an 

exemption does not apply.  This will be assessed against principles that consider 

biodiversity, land degradation and water quality.  MRWA has an exemption for road 

widening works until January 2006, except where those works impact an 

Environmentally Sensitive Area (ESA).  As Passing Lane 1 has some potential to 

indirectly impact the John Forrest National Park, a Clearing Permit will be required for 

that area, however, it is believed that Passing Lanes 2 and 4 would be exempt. 

Although Passing Lane 4 passes close to part of Wooroloo Brook, which is mapped as 

an ESA, there will be no direct impact on the Brook. 



3.1.2 

Impacts on Wetlands 

Passing Lane one has the potential to impact directly on a tributary of Strelley Brook 

which crosses the road in that area and which runs parallel to the road for some 

distance.  Due to the perceived risks, and based on recent consultation with CALM, 

MRWA has re-designed the drainage of Passing Lane 1 to avoid having any direct 

impact on the Brook where it runs parallel to the road.  There is a minor risk of erosion 

and downstream sedimentation within and along the channel, and this will need to be 

managed carefully through suitable rock armouring and other scour protection 

mechanisms. 

The works at Passing Lane 4 intersect a minor drainage gully running across the road 

to the east.  There is potential for erosion at this gully but suitable culvert engineering 

and protection will minimise this risk. 

18 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

A Permit to Disturb a Bed or Bank is not required due to the small size of the 



waterways which will be impacted.  However, the DoE have been given notice of the 

location and details of works in case any complaints from downstream landowners are 

made. 

3.1.3 

Flora and Vegetation Protection 

Declared Rare and Priority Species 

No Declared Rare or priority flora species are listed by CALM as occurring within the 

road reserve area between Red Hill and Berry Road, and none have been observed 

during field investigations.  It is possible that some of these species will occur in the 

more intact vegetation of the John Forrest National Park or other patches of remnant 

vegetation bordering the road reserve.  Since none of this vegetation will be destroyed 

during the construction activities, there will be no known detrimental impacts to any 

potentially occurring species of conservation significance.   



Threatened Ecological Communities 

No listed Threatened Ecological Communities (TECs) are found within the areas of the 

Passing Lanes or Truckbay and none of the vegetation types recorded match known 

TEC vegetation descriptions. 



Weeds 

There are some significant weeds present in the areas of proposed works.  

Construction work in the areas which have such weeds present should ensure that soil 

or spoil from these areas is not spread to other sections of Toodyay Road or areas of 

native vegetation bordering the road verge.  The areas which currently have an 

infestation of Leptspermem laevigatum (Victorian Tea Tree) and Watsonia meriana, 

should be managed through a weed management plan, and monitored following 

construction works.  Targeted weed control is also required in order to achieve 

successful rehabilitation within the road reserve adjacent to the works areas. 

Dieback  

The dieback fungus has not been found to be present within the area of Passing Lane 

1 and the truck bay, adjoining John Forrest National Park (Glevan, 2004 and CALM, 

pers. comm.).  However, there is a small chance that dieback may be present in the 

other passing lane areas and Lilydale Pit.   Dieback management should be included 

as part of an EMP for the works and the details of the recommended dieback hygiene 

should be disucssed with CALM. 

No other issues with regard to specific vegetation impose any legislative constraint on 

the project.  Standard design and construction management procedures would be 

necessary to minimise impacts.  



3.1.4 

Fauna 

The potential impacts of the passing lanes on the fauna are minimal due to the small 

amounts of habitat in the road reserve and the presence of other significant areas of 

19 


61/16642/53945     

Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

habitat within the broader area.  No special measures are likely to be necessary to 



manage fauna. 

3.2 

Social and Cultural Issues 

3.2.1 

Access and Severance 

The development of the passing lanes is an extension to the existing road service.  

Therefore, access and severance would not be considered to be a significant issue.  

The design of the passing lanes takes all road and farm access requirements into 

account and may involve only temporary impacts on residents and road users. 

3.2.2 

European Heritage 

Passing Lane 1 may potentially impact the site of the underground oven associated 

with the Redhill Convict Station.  It is believed that this oven is under the southern 

carriageway or shoulder at around SLK 7.050.  GHD consulted the Heritage Council of 

Western Australia, and despite endorsement from the council in 1998, the proposed 

works will require the submission of a Development Referral.  The Referral should 

include a summary of the project, an outline of the potential impacts and any research 

that has already been undertaken.   

It is recommended that MRWA commission an archaeologist to be present during 

excavation works in the vicinity of the potential oven location.  



3.2.3 

Aboriginal Heritage 

No Aboriginal sites, registered on the Department of Indigenous Affairs (DIA) 

database, have been identified within the study area. 

A search of the DIA database does not comprise of a full assessment under the 



Aboriginal Heritage Act (1972).  This would require consultation with Aboriginal people 

with knowledge of the area (usually, but not necessarily, Native Title Claimants), and 

an archaeological survey to ascertain whether any previously unrecorded 

archaeological sites are within the proposed works area.  If any significant 

ethnographic or archaeological sites are found within the proposed works area, a 

clearance under Section 18 of the Act will be required. 

Under the Aboriginal Heritage Act (1972), it is an offence to disturb an Aboriginal 

heritage site whether it is registered or not.  The proponent should be made aware of 

this in any decision making with respect to whether they should proceed to a full 

Aboriginal heritage site assessment. 

Should any artefacts or other materials of potential indigenous significance be 

discovered at the site, such as during earthworks, investigations will be required to 

ascertain the implications of the presence of these materials and the DIA should be 

notified of the find. This is a requirement under the Aboriginal Heritage Act, 1972.  

Should any skeletal remains be found during earthworks the Western Australian Police 

should be notified. 

20 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

3.3 



Construction Issues 

The possibility of significant construction impacts on adjacent houses and buildings 

has been considered.  Fieldwork and design drawings indicate that there are no 

residential premises located within 200m of the road. 



3.3.1 

Noise 

No residential dwellings were seen during the 2005 site visit to be within 200m of the 

edge of Toodyay Road in any of the areas proposed for the passing lanes.  Therefore 

noise is unlikely to be an issue.  Under the Environmental Protection (Noise) 

Regulations 1997 (DEP, 1997) there is no requirement for the noise from construction 

activities to be kept under particular limits.  However, there are requirements related to 

working hours, equipment noise and complaints.   

3.3.2 

Dilapidation 

As above, no residential dwellings were seen during the 2005 site visit to be within 

200m of the edge of Toodyay Road in any of the areas proposed for the passing lanes.  

Therefore a dilapidation study is not believed to be required.   



3.3.3 

Dust 

Dust will be a potential nuisance factor for road users when the new passing lanes are 

being constructed.  However, dust can be adequately managed using standard 

techniques. 



3.3.4 

Protection of Water Quality 

Due to the slopes and soil types considerable runoff may be expected following heavy 

rain events during the construction period and prior to effective rehabilitation.  This 

must be carefully managed in order to prevent detrimental impacts on the tributaries to 

the Wooroloo Brook, Strelley Brook and the other ephemeral drainage lines in the 

area.  The main issue of concern will be with regard to turbidity and sedimentation but 

this can be managed using standard construction techniques. 

3.4 

Road Operation and Use 

This section identifies potential issues associated with the operation and use of the 

passing lanes. 

3.4.1 

Potential for Air Pollution 

The levels of traffic identified in this proposal are significantly below any criteria for an 

air quality assessment.  The MRWA Environmental Guideline on Air Quality indicates 

that a local air quality assessment is not required if : 

 

the road traffic levels are predicted to be less than 15,000 vpd for rural areas; or 



 

there are no sensitive receptors within 200m of the road centre.   



21 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

Both of these criteria are found in the areas of all Passing Lanes and the truck bay. 



The rural location of this road indicates that existing air quality in this area will be of a 

very high standard, unless significant wood burning is undertaken for space heating 

during the winter.  The construction of the passing lanes will, in fact, improve traffic 

flow and therefore have a positive effect on air pollution. 



3.4.2 

Traffic Noise 

The developments are an extension of the current road.  Therefore it would be 

expected that noise levels would not increase due to the construction of the passing 

lanes. 


3.4.3 

Runoff and Drainage Aspects 

Road runoff is likely to be quite substantial due to the soil types, slopes and extent of 

pavement.  This concentrated runoff has the potential to cause considerable scour as 

well as affecting stream zones and downstream water quality.  Some localised 

dissipation of drainage water may be required to effectively control water flows and 

reduce the risks of downstream pollution and scouring.  Rock protection has been 

designed for areas at high risk of erosion and this should be satisfactory for reducing 

the risk of impacts from concentrated runoff. 



3.4.4 

Visual Impact 

Toodyay Road is located through a largely rural landscape as well as an area of 

National Park, which, due to its location at the edge of the Darling Scarp (Passing Lane 

1), provides exceptional views over the coastal plain.  The potential for negative visual 

impacts as a result of the construction of the passing lanes is considered to be low.  

MRWA should ensure that during construction that all trees that need to be removed 

are clearly marked.  Once work is completed on the passing lanes, appropriate 

rehabilitation techniques should be utilised to improve areas adjacent to the works 

area. 

22 


61/16642/53945     

Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

4.      Risk Assessment 



Two risk assessment techniques have been used to consider the significance of the 

proposed road with regard to a range of issues.  These are: 

1.  MRWA Low Impact Environmental Screening; and 

2.  MRWA Environmental Aspects for Referral to EPA. 



4.1 

MRWA Low Impact Environmental Screening 

As a result of this checklist the project had a small number of aspects that were subject 

to further assessment and it was therefore not classed as low impact.  The potential 

impacts have been further investigated in the PEIA and this EIA.    



4.2 

MRWA Environmental Aspects for Referral  

MRWA has produced a list of environmental aspects, which, if affected by a road 

proposal, would require that proposal to be referred to the EPA (see Appendix B).   

Some of these may also trigger the Commonwealth Environmental Protection and 



Biodiversity Conservation Act (1999) and therefore require the project to be referred to 

the Department of Environment and Heritage (DEH).   

All aspects in this list have been considered with regard to their relevance to the 

Toodyay Road passing lanes and none are likely to ‘trigger’ referral to the EPA or the 

DEH.  The potential for impacts on the National Park has been discussed with CALM 

and the former DEP and the latter have confirmed that referral is not required. 

Under the Environmental Protection (Clearing of Native Vegetation) Regulations 2004, 

a Clearing Permit is required for Passing Lane 1, as it may be considered to impact an 

ESA (John Forrest National Park).   

The presence of the Redhill Convict Station site immediately adjoining Passing Lane 1 

requires the need for a development referral to the Heritage Council of Western 

Australia.  The potential impacts on the site from the construction of Passing Lane 1 

have previously been considered by the Heritage Council but the approval and 

recommendations have lapsed as it was referred more than 2 years ago. 

23 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

5. 



Summary of Relevant Issues 

The following table summarises the relevant potential issues associated with 

construction of the passing lanes along Toodyay Road.  Recommendations are made 

for the requirement for further study and the potential for formal clearances or special 

management necessary for each issue. 

 

Issue 



Further Study 

Required 

Yes/no 

Possible Clearance or Special 

Management Required  

Biological Issues 

 

 



Impact on the National Park  No  

Relates to other biological issues 

and rehabilitation.  Should involve 

ongoing consultation with CALM.  

Impact on Declared Rare 

Flora, Priority flora and 

TECs 

No 


No 

Impact on fauna and 

habitat 

No 


No 

Land clearing 

Possible 

A Clearing Permit for Passing 

Lane 1 is required under the 

Environmental Protection 

(Clearing of Native Vegetation) 

Regulations 2004.   

Weeds 


No 

Weed Management Program 

should be developed for 

rehabilitation works and control of 

significant environmental weeds. 

Dieback 


No 

Discuss the requirements for 

dieback hygiene with CALM for 

Passing Lane 1 and truck bay. 



Social Issues 

 

 



Severance and access 

No 


No 

Aboriginal Heritage 

No 

Section 18 clearance under the 



Aboriginal Heritage Act if 

significant sites aredisturbed.  

24 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

Issue 



Further Study 

Required 

Yes/no 

Possible Clearance or Special 

Management Required  

European Heritage 

Possible 

Potential impacts on Convict 

Station Site.  Requires further 

consultation with the Heritage 

Council and a Development 

Referral.  



Construction and Road 

Use Issues 

 

 

Impact on water quality 

No 

Standard runoff management and 



erosion protection techniques to 

be employed. 

Noise 

No  


No 

Dilapidation 

No 

No 


Visual Impact 

No 


Design and rehabilitation 

requirements only. 

Rehabilitation 

No 


Landscape Design and 

Revegetation Plans have been 

developed (KBR, 2005 and GHD, 

2005) 


 

25 


61/16642/53945     

Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

6. 



Conclusion and Recommendations 

Most of the issues highlighted in this report with regard to construction of the passing 

lanes along Toodyay Road can be adequately managed using standard design and 

construction techniques.  There are no obvious major constraints to the construction or 

operation of the road in terms of clearances that would be difficult to achieve or which 

would require innovative design to become acceptable.   

The most significant biological issue is in the area of Passing Lane 1, which adjoins the 

boundary of John Forrest National Park.  MRWA’s previous discussions with CALM 

and the former DEP regarding an overtaking lane at (SLK 4.88 to SLK 5.48) indicated 

that referral was not required and it is therefore considered that referral will not be 

required for Passing Lanes 1, 2, 4 or the truck bay.  However, ongoing discussion with 

CALM should occur in relation to the acceptance of weed and dieback hygiene 

commitments and proposed rehabilitation adjacent to John Forrest National Park.  

Given suitable management of drainage and dieback and an agreed revegetation plan 

it is not expected that this issue would prevent the project proceeding.  There are no 

other triggers that would mandate the project being referred to the EPA or the DEH.  A 

detailed Environmental Management Plan is being developed to ensure adequate 

management of all relevant environmental impacts. 

A Clearing Permit will be required for Passing Lane 1 as it adjoins an ESA.  This will 

require details on drainage management during and after construction works, 

vegetation protection details and rehabilitation plans. 

One European heritage site exists within the vicinity the road reserve at Passing Lane 

1.  This site is referred to as Redhill Convict Station.  It is unlikely that the convict 

station ruin will be impacted by construction of Passing Lane 1, however 

archaeological research indicates that an oven is possibly present within the proposed 

Passing Lane 1 area, mostly likely beneath the existing road shoulder.  Consultation 

with the Heritage Council indicates that a Referral Document will be required prior to 

approval for construction.   

No Aboriginal heritage sites have been previously identified within the works area, 

however, standard precautions should be taken for management of any archaeological 

material which may be uncovered during construction. 

Social issues such as severance, noise increase and risk of crashes and spills along 

the road would not increase due to the construction of the passing lanes. 

6.1 

Recommendations 

The following are recommendations for completion of the environmental and heritage 

assessment of the proposed passing lane project and to ensure that all potential issues 

have been addressed. 

1.  Develop a Weed Management Program to control specific weeds in Passing Lane 1 

and to maximise the change of successful rehabilitation in all passing lane areas. 

26 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

2.  Implement the EMP which is being developed for the project; and 



3.  Carry out further consultation with: 

–  CALM in relation to ongoing impacts on the John Forrest National Park,  

–  the DoE with regard to the required Clearing Permit; and  

–  the Heritage Council of Western Australia regarding a Development Referral for 

the convict site. 

 

27 



61/16642/53945     

Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

7. 



References 

Alan Tingay and Associates (1998).  A Strategic Plan for Perth’s Greenways.  Final 



Report.  Alan Tingay and Assoc.  Perth. 

ATA Environmental, 2004. Weed Survey: Toodyay Road. Appendix C in KBR, 2005. 



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes Design Report. KBR, Perth. 

Beard, J.S. (1979).  The Vegetation of the Perth Area.  Figure and Explanatory 



Memoir, 1:250,000.  Vegmap Publications, Perth. 

Bush, F., Gibbs, M. and Stephens, J. (1996).  The Toodyay Road Redhill Convict Road 



Station; an Archaeological and Architectural Assessment.  Prepared for Main Roads 

and the Shire of Swan, January 1996. 

CALM (1991).  Flora and Fauna Survey of the John Forrest National Park and Red Hill 

Area.  Report to the Heritage Council.  Department of Conservation and Land 

Management, Perth, June 1991. 

CALM (1994).  John Forrest National Park Management Plan 1994-2004.  Report to 

NPNCA.  Department of Conservation and Land Management , Perth. 

CALM, 1999. Environmental Weed Strategy for Western Australia. Department of 

Conservation and Land Management, Perth. 

Churchward, H.M and McArthur, W.M. (1978). Darling System, Landforms and Soils.  



Division of Land Resources Management, CSIRO.  Perth. 

Department of Agriculture, 2005. Declared Plants Search. 

[http://agwdsrv02.agric.wa.gov.au/dps/version02/01_plantsearch.asp] viewed 27 June 

2005. 


Department of Environmental Protection (1997).  Environmental Protection (Noise) 

Regulations 1997.  Summary of the Regulations, Government of Western Australia. 

Dell, J. (1983).  The importance of the Darling Scarp to fauna.  In J.D. Majer (Ed.), 

Scarp Symposium.  WAIT Environmental Studies Group, Report No. 10. 

EPA, 2004. Revised Draft Environmental Protection (Swan Coastal Plain Wetlands) 

Policy and Regulations 2004. EPA, Perth. 

Garnett, S. (Ed.) (1992).  Threatened and extinct birds of Australia.  Royal Australasian 

Ornithologists Union, Report No. 82. 

Garnett, S.T. and G.M. Crowley (2000).  The Action Plan for Australian Birds.  2000.  

Environment Australia, Canberra. 

GHD (2002) Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 1 to 4 - Preliminary Environmental Impact 



Assessment. Report prepared for Main Roads Western Australia. 

GHD (2005).  Toodyay Road Passing Lanes Revegetation Plan.  Report prepared for 

Main Roads Western Australia. 

28 


61/16642/53945     

Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

Glevan Consulting, 2004. Phytophthora cinnamomi – Assessment Results and 



Management recommendations. Glevan Consulting, Perth. 

Heddle, E.M., Loneragan O.W. and Havel, J.J. (1980).  Vegetation Complexes of the 



Darling System Western Australia.  In: Atlas of Natural Resources, Darling System 

Western Australia.  Department of Conservation and Environment, 1980. 

Heritage and Conservation Professionals (1998).  Redhill Convict Station, Toodyay 

Road.  Conservation Plan.  Prepared for Main Roads Western Australia. 

Hill, A.L.., Semeniuk, C.A., Semeniuk, V and Del Marco, A. (1996).  Wetlands of the 



Swan Coastal Plain, Volume 2B.  Water and Rivers Commission and Department of 

Environmental Protection, WA. 

Johnstone, R.E. and G.M. Storr (1998).  Handbook of Western Australian Birds.  

Volume 1. Non-Passerines.  W.A. Museum, Perth. 

KBR, 2005. Toodyay Road Passing Lanes Design Report. KBR, Perth. 

Kennedy, M. (Ed.) (1990).  A Complete Reference to Australia’s Endangered Species.  

Simon and Schuster, Sydney. 

Main Roads Western Australia (2003).  Toodyay Road Passing Lanes Environmental 

Management Plan.  Unpublished report, Main Roads Western Australia. 

Storr, G.M. (1991).  Birds of the South-West Division of Western Australia.  Records of 

the Western Australian Museum, Supp. No. 35. 

Wilson, S.K. and D.G. Knowles (1988).  Australia’s Reptiles.  Collins, Sydney. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



29 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Figure 1 

 Toodyay Road Locality Plan 

30 


61/16642/53945     

Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

Appendix A 



List of Rare Fauna Possible in the 

Project Area (2005) 

31 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

 



APPENDIX A 

List of the rare vertebrate fauna species recorded in the CALM 

rare fauna database. 

 

 



Schedule 1 (Fauna which is Rare or likely to become Extinct) 

Chuditch (Dasyurus geoffroii)  This species occurs in the area in question and is 

becoming more common in areas of jarrah-wandoo forest that are baited to control 

exotic predators.  It is classified as ‘Vulnerable’ under the EPBC Act. 

Carnaby’s Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) This species is a seasonal visitor 

in the area in question.  It feeds extensively on the proteaceous shrublands where they 

have been retained.  It is classified as “Endangered’ under the EPBC Act

Baudin’s Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus baudinii) This species is resident in the tall 

eucalypt forest to the south of Mundaring and a seasonal visitor in areas around John 

Forest National Park and further north.  It is classified as “Endangered’ under the 

EPBC Act

 

Schedule 4 (Fauna which is Otherwise Specially Protected) 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) This species may occur as a vagrant in the 

area in question, either in open woodlands or around the quarries located in the area in 

question. 

Carpet Python (Morelia spilota imbricata) This species is known to occur in upland 

areas throughout this part of the Darling Scarp wherever remnant vegetation has been 

retained. 

 

Priority Taxa 



Brush-tailed Phascogale (Phascogale tapoatafa) P3 This species occurs in the tall 

eucalypt forests around Mundaring and areas to the north but is generally at low 

densities. 

Quenda (Isoodon obesulus fusciventer) P5 This species has been recorded from 

the area in question in locations with low dense heath vegetation and jarrah and marri 

forest, particularly in riparian habitats. 

Western Brush Wallaby (Macropus irma) P4 This species still occurs in the larger 

patches of native shrubland within the area in question. 

 

 

32 



61/16642/53945     

Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

Appendix B 



Environmental Aspects for Referral to the 

EPA or DEH 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

Types of Environmental Aspects 

A road project that has environmental aspects from the following lists will most likely require 

referral to the EPA.  These aspects may be considered in terms of biophysical, pollution 



prevention and social surroundings. 

 

Factor 

Description 

Present on Toodyay Road 

Native remnant 

vegetation 

Areas recommended for protection in the 

System’s ‘Red Book’ reports in non-Perth 

metropolitan regions. 

No 

Areas identified in Bush Forever, which 

supersedes the System’s ‘Red Book’ reports 

in areas of overlap. 

No 

Land vested in the National Parks and Nature 

Conservation Authority for the purpose of 

Conservation of Flora and Fauna, National 

Park or Conservation Park. 

Adjoins John Forrest 

National Park at Passing 

Lane 1 and truck bay 

Areas recommended by the Department of 

Conservation and Land Management and 

endorsed by Government for inclusion in 

Department of Conservation and Land 

Management's Estate. 

No 

Land reserved as “Parks and Recreation” 

under the Metropolitan Region Scheme. 

No 

Areas managed for multiple uses where 

conservation is a defined use. 

No 

Land reserved under the Regional Forest 

Agreement CAR reserve system 

No 

Areas with rare vegetation communities, or 

assemblages considered by the EPA not 

adequately represented in secure 

conservation reserves (including Threatened 

Ecological Communities). 

No 

Land containing declared rare flora and fauna 

and the habitats of declared rare fauna. 

None observed 

Vegetation in regional areas where there is 

less than 20% remnant vegetation remaining 

within the local authority area. 

No 

Vegetation in regional areas which is 

considered to poorly represented according to 

definitions within the Environmental 

Protection Authority Position Statement No.2 

“Environmental Protection of Native 

Vegetation in Western Australia” 

No 

Vegetation which includes species of declared 

rare and priority flora where specific clearance 

has not been obtained from Department of 

Conservation and Land Management for the 

clearing of this vegetation. 

 

None known 

 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

Factor 



Description 

Present on Toodyay Road 

Wetlands 

Lakes nominated for protection in the 

Environmental Protection (Swan Coastal Plain 

Lakes) Policy gazetted in December 1992. 

No 

Conservation and Resource Management 

category wetlands. 

No 

Wetlands nominated for protection in the Draft 

Environmental Protection Policy for Lakes and 

Swamps of the South West Agricultural Zone. 

No 

 

 

Wetland areas recommended for protection in 

the System’s ‘Red Book’ reports not within the 

area covered by Bushplan. 

No 

Conservation wetlands identified in Bush 

Forever, which supersedes the System’s ‘Red 

Book’ reports in areas of overlap. 

No 

Wetlands on land vested in the National Parks 

and Nature Conservation Authority for the 

purpose of Conservation of Flora and Fauna, 

National Park or Conservation Park, or areas 

recommended, and endorsed by Government, 

for inclusion in Department of Conservation 

and Land Management estate for conservation 

purposes. 

No 

Wetlands in areas reserved as “Parks and 

Recreation” under the Metropolitan Region 

Scheme. 

No 

Wetlands  with rare vegetation communities 

considered by the EPA not adequately 

represented in secure conservation areas, or 

rare flora and fauna (and their habitats) 

especially east of the Swan Coastal Plain. 

No 

Wetlands recognised by international 

agreement because of their importance 

primarily for waterbirds and their habitats. (eg: 

RAMSAR, JAMBA, CAMBA). 

 

No 

Watercourses and 

rivers 

Watercourses recommended for protection in 

the System’s ‘Red Book’ reports not within the 

area covered by Bushplan. 

No 

Watercourse wetlands identified in Bush 

Forever, which supersedes the System’s ‘Red 

Book’ reports in areas of overlap. 

No 

Watercourses containing lakes protected 

under the Environmental Protection (Swan 

Coastal Plain Lakes) Policy 1992. 

Strelley Brook 

Wooroloo Brook 

 

 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

Factor 



Description 

Present on Toodyay Road 

Watercourses on land vested in the National 

Parks and Nature Conservation Authority for 

the purpose of Conservation of Flora and 

Fauna, National Park or Conservation Park or 

areas recommended, and endorsed by 

Government, for inclusion in the Department 

of Conservation and Land Management estate 

for conservation purposes. 

A minor tributary of 

Strelley Brook at passing 

Lane 1 

Watercourses in areas reserved as “Parks and 

Recreation” under the Metropolitan Region 

Scheme. 

No 

Watercourses with rare vegetation 

communities considered by the EPA not 

adequately represented in secure 

conservation areas, or rare flora and fauna 

(and their habitats). 

 

No 

Estuaries and inlets 

Coastlines and near 

shore marine areas  

In general, all estuaries are of interest to the 

EPA, however, certain estuaries have specific 

management agencies which have statutory 

and advisory roles to play in their protection. 

These include the: 

 



Peel Inlet - Harvey Estuary,  

 



Leschenault Inlet,  

 



Albany and Princess Royal Harbour,  

 



Wilson Inlet, and  

 



Swan - Canning Estuary. 

N/A 

Areas recommended for protection in the 

Systems ‘Red Books’ reports. 

N/A 

Coastline containing mangroves. 

N/A 

Areas identified by the Department of 

Conservation and Land Management for 

inclusion on the List of Wetlands of 

International Importance (RAMSAR 

Convention). 

N/A 

Coastline areas (including marine areas) 

recommended by Department of Conservation 

and Land Management, and endorsed by 

Government for inclusion in Department of 

Conservation and Land Management's estate 

for conservation purposes. 

N/A 

Coastline in areas reserved for “Parks and 

Recreation” under the Metropolitan Region 

Scheme. 

N/A 

Coastline areas with rare vegetation 

communities considered by the EPA not 

adequately represented in secure 

conservation areas, or rare flora and fauna 

(and their habitats). 

N/A 

Coastline where recreational use is high, such 

as beaches in the metropolitan region. 

N/A 

 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

Factor 



Description 

Present on Toodyay Road 

Significant landforms including Beach Ridge 

Plain, Coastal Dunes (generally within 100 m 

of the shore) and Karst landforms. 

 

N/A 

Catchments with 

special requirements 

Lake Clifton 

N/A 

Western Swamp Tortoise Habitat 

N/A 

Forrestdale Lakes 

N/A 

Wetlands and their associated environmental 

management areas, associated with Jandakot 

and Gnangara Mounds. 

N/A 

 

Table E.1 Biophysical Aspects cont … 

 

 

Factor 

Description 

Present on Toodyay Road

 

Contaminated soils 

Existing areas of soil contamination that may 

be disturbed by future construction of road 

transport infrastructure. 

Not known, highly 

unlikely

 

Noise and Vibration 

Potential impacts on residential areas due to 

the relationship between the location of road 

transport infrastructure with respect to 

residential areas or other sensitive facilities 

such as hospitals and the like. 

No

 

Public water source 

areas - groundwater 

and surface water  

Priority 1 & 2, Gnangara Mound. 

No

 

Priority 1 & 2, Jandakot Mound. 

No

 

Water & Rivers Commission gazetted 

groundwater areas outside the Perth 

metropolitan area. 

No

 

All surface catchments where water is 

collected for public water supply purposes. 

No

 

 

Table E.2 

Pollution Prevention

 Aspects 



 

Factor 

Description 

Present on Toodyay Road

 

Aboriginal heritage 

Sites of Aboriginal significance due to 

ethnographic or archaeological issues. 

None recorded.  

 

European Heritage 

Sites listed by the Australian Heritage 

Commission or the Register of Heritage 

Places. 

No

 

Adjacent land uses 

Land uses and zonings

,

  which could be 

affected by road proposals. 

No

 

 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

Appendix C 



Convict Station Site Details 

 

 



61/16642/53945     

Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

Appendix D 



Field Records of Flora Species Observed 

During Site Visits in 2002 and 2005 

 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

 



Passing Lane Number 1 and Truck Bay: Eastbound from SLK 5.62 to SLK 7.28. 

This section of overtaking lane 1 was assessed from the boundary of John Forrest National Park with 

Toodyay Road, to 150-200 metres east of the site entrance to the Pioneer Quarry on Red Hill, a distance 

of approximately 1.4 kilometres.  The species listed were recorded from the road verge area and the 

adjacent area to the road verge.  Some of the species recorded were naturally occurring, whilst others 

are considered to be revegetation species planted by MRWA in the road verge area in the past.  There 

are also a number of introduced annual and perennial pasture species present in the road verge area 

and beyond.   

Species present in the section of road verge from 150 – 200 metres east of Pioneer Quarry entrance till 

main quarry entrance:   



Acacia nervosa, A. pulchella, A. saligna, Anigozanthos sp., Astroloma pallidum, Chorizema dicksonii, 

Corymbia calophylla, Gastrolobium/Nemcia sp., Hakea cristata/undulata, H. lissocarpha, H. trifurcata, 

Hibbertia hypericoides, Lepidosperma sp., Lomandra sp., Mesomelaena tetragona, Neurachne 

alopecuroidea, Patersonia occidentalis, Philotheca spicata, Pimelea suaveolens, Santalaceae sp., 

Synaphea sp. and Xanthorrhoea preissii.   

Species present in the section of road verge from the Pioneer Quarry entrance to the boundary with the 

John Forrest National Park near the Red Hill convict station site:   

Acacia pulchella, Allocasuarina humilis, Andersonia lehmanniana, Anigozanthos sp., Apiaceae sp., 

Astartea fascicularis, Corymbia calophylla, Cryptandra arbutiflora/glabriflora, Dampiera sp. (D.

lavandulacea), Daviesia sp., Diuris brumalis, Drosera sp., Dryandra bipinnatifida, D. nivea/lindleyana, D. 

sessilis, D. squarrosa/armataGastrolobium sp., Grevillea endlicheriana, G. synapheae, Hakea 

lissocarpha, Hakea sp., H. trifurcata, Hibbertia sp., H. hypericoides, Hovea trisperma, Juncus sp. (J. 

pallidus), Kennedia prostrata, Lechenaultia biloba, Lepidosperma sp., Leucopogon sp., Lomandra sp.1, 

L. sp. 2, Mesomelaena tetragona, Patersonia occidentalis, Pentapeltis peltigera, Petrophile biloba, Sollya 

heterophylla, Stylidium amoenum, S. bulbiferum, Thomasia sp., Thysanotus patersonii, Trichocline 

spathulata, Trymalium ledifolium and Viminaria juncea.   

Two introduced species, which are potentially invasive environmental weeds in this section of proposed 

roadworks are Nerium oleander (Oleander) and Watsonia sp. (W. meriana).   

 

Passing Lane Number 2: Eastbound from SLK 13.3 to SLK 15.77. 

The section of Toodyay Road, which was assessed during the site visit for this passing lane, was from 

the intersection with Stoneville Road to the intersection with Morecombe Road, a distance of 

approximately 2.0 kilometres.  Species present in this area are: 

Acacia nervosa, A. pulchella, A. saligna, A. wildenowiana, Agonis linearifolia, Astartea fascicularis, 

Boronia/Philotheca sp., Bossiaea ornata, Calothamnus quadrifidus, Casuarina obesa, Corymbia 

calophylla, Daviesia horrida/preissii, Desmocladus flexuosus/fasciculatus, Dianella revoluta, Drosera sp., 

Dryandra nivea/lindleyana, Eucalyptus marginata, E. wandoo, Gastrolobium/Nemcia sp., Grevillea 

bipinnatifida, Hakea lissocarpha, H. undulata/cristata, Hibbertia hypericoides, Hovea pungens, 

Hypocalymma angustifolium, Lechenaultia biloba, Lepidosperma sp., Lomandra sp., Melaleuca 

 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

preissiana, Mesomelaena tetragona, Opercularia hispidula, Pericalymma ellipticum, Phyllanthus 



calycinus, Pterostylis sp., ?Stypandra glauca, Xanthorrhoea preissii and X. gracilis.   

Environmental weed species present in this section of proposed roadworks are Acacia 



baileyana/decurrens, Corymbia citriodora, Cyperus sp., Leptospermum laevigatum and Watsonia 

meriana.   

Passing Lane Number 4: Eastbound from SLK 6.50 to SLK 8.17. 

The section of Toodyay Road, which was assessed during the site visit for this passing lane was from the 

intersection with Berry Road to the Wooroloo Brook bridge crossing.  This covers a distance of 

approximately 1.7 kilometres.  The first section of roadside vegetation was native remnant vegetation up 

until a MRWA marker peg stamped with the figure SLK 8.0.  The species recorded in this section of 

remnant vegetation are:  



Acacia nervosa, A. pulchella, A. saligna, Austrostipa elegantissima, Bossiaea eriocarpa, Burchardia 

umbellata/multiflora, Daviesia sp., Desmocladus flexuosus/fasciculatus, Dianella revoluta, Dryandra 

nivea/lindleyana, Eucalyptus wandoo, Grevillea synapheae, Haemodorum sp., Hakea prostrata, 

Hibbertia sp., Kennedia prostrata, Lepidosperma sp., Leucopogon oxycedrus/propinquus, Lomandra sp., 

Orchidaceae sp., Phyllanthus calycinus, Tetraria octandra and Xanthorrhoea preissii.   

The next section of the road verge, for a distance of approximately 150 – 160 metres from the SLK 8.0 

peg, is an area of past MRWA rehabilitation, with the following species present: 



Acacia drummondii, A. extensa, A. lasiocarpa, Allocasuarina fraseriana/huegeliana, Allocasuarina sp., 

Banksia grandis, Calothamnus quadrifidus, Drosera sp., Dryandra sp., Eucalyptus leucoxylon var. rosea, 

E. wandoo, Gastrolobium/Nemcia sp., Hakea cristata/undulata, H. laurina, H. lissocarpha, H petiolaris, 

H. trifurcata, Hypocalymma angustifolium, Melaleuca ? radula and Patersonia ?occidentalis.   

After the area vegetated with rehabilitational species, the road verge is once again vegetated with 

remnant native species for a distance of approximately 120 – 150 metres.  Most of the area occupied 

with remnant native vegetation is outside the area of future impacts from the construction of the passing 

lane, although some of the opportunistic native species which are present in the road verge (likely to 

have germinated in this area as a result of past disturbance, and more freely available water due to the 

roadside drain beside the road), will need to be removed for construction of the passing lane.  These 

opportunistic native species present in the roadside drain area are Lepidosperma sp., Stylidium sp., 



Neurachne alopecuroidea and ? Casuarina obesa.  The species present in the remnant native vegetation 

are; Acacia pulchella, Allocasuarina fraseriana/huegeliana, Corymbia calophylla, Daviesia sp.1, Daviesia 

sp. 2, Eucalyptus wandoo, Gastrolobium/Nemcia sp., Kennedia prostrata/carinata, Lepidosperma sp., 

Lomandra sp., Melaleuca rhaphiophylla/preissiana, Neurachne alopecuroidea and Phyllanthus calycinus.   

Another small area of rehabilitation vegetation after this remnant native vegetation is present for 

approximately 80 metres.  There are a mix of native and rehabilitation species present in the road verge.  

The species recorded as present are; Acacia drummondii, A. pulchella, Allocasuarina humilis, Banksia 



grandis, Bossiaea ornata, Calothamnus quadrifidus, Corymbia calophylla, Dianella revoluta, Dryandra 

polycephala, Eucalyptus marginata, E. wandoo, Hakea cristata/undulata, H. laurina and H. trifurcata.   

As the Wooroloo Brook drainage line is approached (heading west down Toodyay Road), there are many 

more individuals present of Banksia grandis, Callistemon sp., and Melaleuca rhaphiophylla (Swamp 

Paperbark).  Other species present are a mixture of remnant native species and rehabilitation species.  

The following taxa are present; Acacia pulchella, A. saligna, Astroloma pallidum, Bossiaea ornata, 

 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

Callistemon phoeniceus, Calothamnus quadrifidus, Corymbia calophylla, Dampiera lavandulacea, 



Daviesia sp., Dryandra sp., Eucalyptus marginata, E. wandoo, Hakea lissocarpha/erinacea, H. prostrata, 

Hypocalymma angustifolium, Juncus pallidus, Macrozamia riedlei, Orchidaceae sp., Pentapeltis 

peltigera, Stypandra glauca, Trichocline spathulata and Xanthorrhoea preissii.   

The opposite side of Toodyay Road (across from the side where construction works will be undertaken) 

was also assessed to see if there were any intact areas of vegetation or flora species of conservation 

significance present in the road reserve area.  This side of Toodyay Road was mostly very degraded with 

only few native species present, and the remainder of the area dominated by introduced annual and 

perennial species.  The native species present are Eucalyptus marginata, E. wandoo, Hakea prostrata, 



Acacia pulchella and A. saligna.  A minor drainage line draining into the Wooroloo Brook was vegetated 

with Eucalyptus rudis over Typha domingensis and weed species (Eragrostis curvula and Schinus 



terebinthifolia).  Other native species present include; Acacia nervosa, Daviesia sp., Dianella revoluta, 

Gastrolobium/Nemcia sp., Hypocalymma angustifolium, and Lepidosperma sp.   

 

 



 

61/16642/53945     



Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



 

 

GHD Pty Ltd

  ABN 39 008 488 373 

GHD House, 239 Adelaide Tce. Perth, WA 6004 

P.O. Box Y3106, Perth WA 6832 

T: 61 8 6222 8666   F: 61 8 6222 8555   E: permail@ghd.com.au 



© GHD Pty Ltd 2005 

This document is and shall remain the property of GHD Pty Ltd. The document may only be used for the 

purposes for which it was commissioned and in accordance with the Terms of Engagement for the 

commission. Unauthorised use of this document in any form whatsoever is prohibited. 



Document Status 

Rev 


No. 

Author 


Reviewer 

Approved for Issue 

Name 

Signature 



Name 

Signature 

Date 



M. Toner 



A. Napier 

 

A. Napier 



 

 



M Toner 

A Napier 

 

A Napier 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



61/16642/53945     

Toodyay Road Passing Lanes 

Preliminary Environmental Impact Assessment - Update 



Document Outline

  • 1. Introduction
    • 1.1 Project Background
    • 1.2 Scope of Work
    • 1.3 Existing Documents
  • 2. Environmental Assessment
    • 2.1 Physical Environment
      • 2.1.1 Landform and Soils
      • 2.1.2 Surface Hydrology and Wetlands
    • 2.2 Adjoining Landuse
    • 2.3 Biological Environment
      • 2.3.1 Vegetation of the General Area
      • 2.3.2 Vegetation of the Proposed Overtaking Lanes, Truck Bay and Lilydale Pit
      • 2.3.3 Threatened Ecological Communities
      • 2.3.4 Flora
      • 2.3.5 Introduced Species
      • 2.3.6 Dieback and other Disease Risks
      • 2.3.7 Fauna
      • 2.3.8 Conservation Reserves
      • 2.3.9 Greenways
    • 2.4 Aboriginal Heritage
      • 2.4.1 Archaeological and Ethnographic Sites
      • 2.4.2 Native Title Issues
    • 2.5 European Heritage
    • 2.6 Consultation
      • 2.6.1 Department of Conservation and Land Management (CALM)
      • 2.6.2 Department of Environmental Protection (former) / Department of Environment
      • 2.6.3 Heritage Council of Western Australia
  • 3. Potential Environmental, Cultural and Social Constraints or Impacts
    • 3.1 Biological Issues
      • 3.1.1 Land Clearing
      • 3.1.2 Impacts on Wetlands
      • 3.1.3 Flora and Vegetation Protection
      • 3.1.4 Fauna
    • 3.2 Social and Cultural Issues
      • 3.2.1 Access and Severance
      • 3.2.2 European Heritage
      • 3.2.3 Aboriginal Heritage
    • 3.3 Construction Issues
      • 3.3.1 Noise
      • 3.3.2 Dilapidation
      • 3.3.3 Dust
      • 3.3.4 Protection of Water Quality
    • 3.4 Road Operation and Use
      • 3.4.1 Potential for Air Pollution
      • 3.4.2 Traffic Noise
      • 3.4.3 Runoff and Drainage Aspects
      • 3.4.4 Visual Impact
  • 4.      Risk Assessment
    • 4.1 MRWA Low Impact Environmental Screening
    • 4.2 MRWA Environmental Aspects for Referral
  • 5. Summary of Relevant Issues
  • 6. Conclusion and Recommendations
    • 6.1 Recommendations
  • 7. References


Yüklə 239,02 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə