Tree distribution pattern and fate of juveniles in a lowland tropical rain forest – implications for regeneration and maintenance of species diversity



Yüklə 434,28 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix15.08.2017
ölçüsü434,28 Kb.
  1   2   3

Plant Ecology 131: 155–171, 1997.

155


c 1997 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in Belgium.

Tree distribution pattern and fate of juveniles in a lowland tropical rain

forest – implications for regeneration and maintenance of species diversity

Toshinori Okuda

1

;

3



, Naoki Kachi

2

;



4

, Son Kheong Yap

1

& N. Manokaran



1

1

Forest Research Institute of Malaysia, Kepong, 52109 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia;

2

National Institute for

Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305 Japan. Present address:

3

National Institute for Environmental



Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305 Japan;

4

Dept. Biology, Faculty of Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University,



Hachioji, 192-03, Japan

Received 3 January 1996; accepted in revised form 31 January 1997



Key words: Dipterocarp forest, Dynamic equilibrium status, Lowland tropical rain forest in Malaysia, Negative

conspecific effect, Regeneration, Spatial distribution pattern



Abstract

Three analyses of species diversity in a lowland dipterocarp forest were conducted to examine whether the nature

of forest community dynamics are determined by density-dependent recruitment and mortality of saplings with

a data set obtained in a 50 ha plot in Pasoh Forest Reserve. The first analysis examined whether sapling density

varied as a function of distance from the nearest conspecific adult. The second analysis assessed the relationship

between the spatial distribution patterns of saplings and adult trees. A third analysis examined sapling recruitment

and mortality based on data from 2 censuses, taken in 1985 and 1990. Four hundred forty-four species (each with

more than 100 individuals) out of the total of 814 species recorded in the plot, were chosen for the analyses. Of

these selected species, 56 species showed significant reduction in sapling densities close to the conspecific adults.

Within this group, 11 species were in the emergent layer (29.0% of the total species in this layer), 17 were in the

canopy layer (10.5%), 18 were in the understory layer (11.3%), and 10 were in treelet and shrub layer (11.8%). In

contrast, the sapling densities of 53 species decreased with increasing distance from conspecific adults; 2 of these

species were in the emergent layer (5.2% of the total species in this layer), 14 were in the canopy layer (8.6%), 21

were in the understory layer (13.2%), and 16 were in the treelet and shrub layer (18.8%). The saplings of 35 of

the 444 total selected species were clumped, while adults were regularly or randomly distributed. Of the remaining

species, in 183 species (41.2%), the distributions of both adults and saplings were clumped. Thus, these 2 analyses

do not support the prediction that most of the species of lowland tropical forests fail to produce new adults in their

vicinity and as a result of this, adult trees are more regularly distributed than their conspecific juveniles (Janzen

1970). In the third analysis, the recruitment of saplings of species in the emergent and canopy layers increased

significantly and in proportion with mortality, suggesting that the dominant species suffer higher mortality than do

less common species. This trend is not so apparent in the understory, and the treelet and shrub layers. The results

imply that a dynamic equilibrium process, which prevents competitive exclusion and maintains space for minor

species, may be active among the species in the upper layers (particularly the emergent layer); however, such a

dynamic equilibrium condition is not due exclusively to the reduced recruitment of saplings near conspecific adults,

and the dynamic equilibrium condition is not prevalent among the lower story species.

Introduction

Both non-equilibrium and equilibrium theories have

been proposed to account for species richness in trop-

ical rain forests, and in addition, the ecological sta-

bility of this biome has long been debated (Hubbell &

Foster 1990b). Tropical forests vary in species richness

from site to site, and within plant communities. Such

heterogeneity may be explained in terms of the preval-

ence of non-equilibrium conditions. Higher diversity

GR: 201002988, Pips nr. 134143 BIO2KAP

*134143*

veg10554.tex; 20/06/1997; 11:58; v.7; p.1



156

is achieved when the disturbances are intermediate in

frequency and intensity (Connell 1978; 1979). In such

a non-equilibrium state, the species are approximately

equal in ability to colonize, exclude invaders, and resist

environmental vicissitudes, species composition and

abundance in a stand are determined by historical and

biogeographical events that have occurred randomly,

such as the availability of a seed source when canopy

gaps are formed (Primack 1990). Some species, there-

fore, are fated to be absent from a site while others

become established by chance.

In contrast, the equilibrium hypothesis postualates

that species can coexist as an assemblage because mor-

tality unrelated to competitive interactions is heavier on

whichever species rank higher in competitive ability, as

proposed in the ‘compensatory mortality hypothesis’

(Connell 1978) or in the ‘escape hypothesis’ (Con-

nell 1971; Howe & Smallwood 1982; Janzen 1970).

For example, a given plant species is prevented from

becoming the dominant species by host-specific preda-

tion (seed predators, herbivores, and pathogens) which

eliminate many individuals in the population due to

density- and frequency-dependent mortality.

However, an equilibrium state can also be achieved

as a consequence of competitive exclusion, which

is in turn a non-equilibrium process. In fact, the

forests closest to equilibrium are those dominated by a

single tree species (Connell 1978). Equilibrium states

achieved by coexistence of species, can be either of 2

types: static or dynamic. Static equilibria can be main-

tained by coexistence of species by, for example, ‘niche

separation’ (e.g., Ricklefs 1977). Dynamic equilibria,

in contrast, include cases in which species composition

fluctuates dynamically and almost perpetually around

an equilibrium point.

Thus, this classification into 2 general categor-

ies, the equilibrium and non-equilibrium hypotheses,

is confusion and the 2 hypotheses are sometimes

described as not being mutually exclusive (Connell

1978). Huston (1994) introduced the concept of a

‘dynamic equilibrium model’ which focuses on the

processes of community dynamics, rather than on an

equilibrium or non-equilibrium state at any particular

moment. According to this concept, a dynamic equilib-

rium model incorporates whichever processes prevent

competitive exclusion; for example, an intermediate

frequency of disturbance prevents competitive exclu-

sion and thereby maintains species diversity. Connell

(1978) previously included such processes in his non-

equilibrium hypothesis. In dynamic equilibrium mod-

els, density or frequency mortality factors can also

be regarded as forces which contribute to a dynam-

ic equilibrium state. Thus, in this paper, we apply

the term ‘dynamic equilibrium condition’, instead of

the previous criterium, ‘equilibrium condition’, which

was proposed with respect to the distinction between

equilibrium and non-equilibrium hypotheses (Connell

1978).

Many empirical studies have examined how



density-dependent mortality regulates seedling and

sapling distributions (e.g., Augspurger 1983a, b; Clark

and Clark 1984; Schupp 1988), but most of them meas-

ured the inhibited recruitment of seedlings in small

numbers of species in highly diverse forests (Condit

1992). Recent tree censuses using long-term studies of

large-scale plots (e.g., 50 ha) where many individual

trees have been recorded systematically, enable us to

examine the equilibrium nature of communities (Con-

dit et al. 1992; Hubbell 1979).

Understanding the equilibrium nature of com-

munities has practical implications for conservation

biologists and forest managers (Hubbell & Foster

1990b). If a forest is in a dynamic equilibrium state,

the abundance of each species is expected to remain

approximately constant despite small fluctuations, and

such fluctuations in species assemblages are relatively

predictable. However, if a forest is in a non-equilibrium

state, many species may face the risk of extermination

and such a loss may be detrimental if the forest area

is not supplied by external seed sources. Furthermore,

predictions of minimum forest area for the preservation

of a species in a non-equilibrium forest are impossible

(Primack 1990).

The primary objective of this study is to ascer-

tain the extent to which dynamic equilibrium forces or

states prevail and contribute to the community dynam-

ics in a lowland dipterocarp forest. Using data from

the 50 ha experimental plot of Pasoh Forest Reserve,

in peninsular Malaysia, we have analyzed the distri-

bution patterns of juvenile and mature trees and the

fate of juvenile trees of major species components of

the forest. This paper addresses the following ques-

tions: (1) What is the distribution of juveniles (sap-

lings) around conspecific adults? If density-dependent

mortality affects juvenile survivorship, then sapling

densities would be expected to increase as a function of

distance from the nearest conspecific adult trees, or to

peak in the middle of the range of seed dispersal. If this

is the case, how many species show such escape phe-

nomena? (2) What are the differences in distribution

patterns between adults and saplings? If juvenile sur-

vivorship is determined in a density-dependent man-

veg10554.tex; 20/06/1997; 11:58; v.7; p.2



157

ner, then adults would be more regularly distributed

than conspecific juveniles as a consequence of density-

dependent mortality of juveniles. How many species

show such a difference in distribution pattern between

adults and juveniles? (3) How is the new recruitment

of a species related to the mortality of juveniles? If

dynamic equilibrium conditions prevail, then common

species with potentially large capacities for recruitment

should suffer higher mortalities than those suffered by

less common species. This last question explores the

role of dynamic equilibrium conditions in the determ-

ination of forest structure and composition, while the

first two examine how the density-dependent distri-

bution and recruitment of saplings contributes to the

equilibrium nature of forests.



Study area and methods

Study area

The study area was in Pasoh Forest Reserve (lat.

2 58

0

N, long. 102 18



0

E) in the state of Negeri Sem-

bilan, about 70 km southeast of Kuala Lumpur, Malay-

sia. The mean annual rainfall measured from 1974 to

1992 at Pasoh-dua (lat. 2 56

0

N, long. 102 18



0

E), 4 km


south of the reserve, was 1842 mm with 2 distinct peaks

in April/May and November/December (Malaysian

Meteorological Service). The parent materials of the

soils in the reserve area consist mainly of shale, granite,

and fluviatile granitic alluvium (Allbrook 1973).

The total area of the reserve is 2450 ha, surroun-

ded on 3 sides by oil palm plantations and adjacent

to virgin hill dipterocarp forest. The dominant vegeta-

tion type in the reserve is lowland dipterocarp forests,

characterized by a high proportion of Dipterocarpaceae

(Symington 1943; Wyatt-Smith 1961, 1964). The core

area of the forest (about 600 ha), where the study plot is

located, is generally homogeneous, with no evidence

of major disturbance, and it is likely to be a repres-

entative of lowland forests on the south-central Malay

Peninsula (Kochummen et al. 1990a; Manokaran &

LaFrankie 1990). The core area is surrounded by regen-

erating forests which were logged in the early 1950s

and the remaining canopy trees in this forest presently

reach 30 to 40 m in height. The density of the emer-

gent trees in this regenerating forest is much less than

that in the core area of the reserve. The forest contains

stands at various stages of maturity from canopy gaps

to climax forest topped by emergent trees with heights

of 50 to 60 m. Gaps are common from place to place

in the forest. The proportion of the newly opened gaps

within an un-logged sub-plot from 1992 to 1994 was

about 4% (Yasuda, unpublished).



Tree census

In 1985, a 50 ha plot (500



1000 m) was established



and censused in the primary forest at Pasoh Forest

Reserve. All woody plants of 1 cm DBH (Diameter at

Breast Height) or larger within this plot, were meas-

ured identified, tagged with consecutive numbers, and

mapped to the nearest 10 cm. The total number of

trees in the initial census was 335 240, consisting of

814 species, 290 genera, and 78 families (Monakaran

et al. 1992). The mean densities were 6769 trees per

hectare



1 cm DBH, 530 trees per hectare





10 cm


DBH, and 3 trees per hectare



90 cm DBH (Man-



okaran and LaFrankie 1990). Approximately 25% of

the total number of tree and shrub species recorded

in the Malay Peninsula (3197) were found in the plot

(Kochummen et al. 1990b). The most abundant famil-

ies across all size classes were Euphorbiaceae, Diptero-

carpaceae, and Annonaceae. Among trees larger than

30 cm DBH, the Dipterocarpaceae was the most abund-

ant family, followed by Leguminosae and Burseraceae

(Kochummen 1990a). The most common species in the

plot is Xerospermum noronhianum (Sapindasecea), a

canopy forming species, accounting for 2.5% of the

total number of trees.

All the methodology used in establishing this plot

and the resulting database are described by Manokaran

et al. (1990). The first re-census of the vegetation was

carried out in 1990, 5 years after the initial census.



Data analysis

All the data analysis in the present study were based

upon the database of the 50 ha plot obtained in the

initial census and the re-census. We used the initial

census data for the analysis of sapling density in rela-

tion to distance from conspecific adults. The analysis

of spatial distribution patterns of saplings and adults

was also based upon the initial census data. For the

analysis of the relationship between new recruitment

and sapling mortality, the initial and re-census data

were used together.

Species with a total number of less than 100 indi-

viduals in the 50 ha plot were excluded from the present

analyses. As a result, 444 total species were selected;

38 species in the emergent layer, 162 in the canopy,

veg10554.tex; 20/06/1997; 11:58; v.7; p.3



158

159 in the understory, and 85 in the treelet and shrub

layers.

Saplings were defined as trees from 1 to 2 cm DBH.



The minimum DBH of an adult tree was designated as

30 cm for an emergent tree, 20 cm for a canopy tree,

10 cm for an understory woody plant, and 5 cm for

a treelet or shrub. These classifications of strata were

done in accordance with stature class (Manokaran et al.

1992). We used this classification for the present study

because seed dispersion capability may vary with tree

height, and tree dispersion pattern may vary among the

species in different strata. Also, regeneration mechan-

isms may be dependent upon strata. For example, it is

well known that many species, especially dipterocarps,

fruit synchronously at 5 to 13 year intervals in lowland

rain forests in southeast Asia (Ashton 1964; Burgess

1968; Fox 1967, 1968; Medway 1972). Approxim-

ately 70% of species that were observed flowering

and fruiting during gregarious (mast) flowering years

were emergent and canopy forming species, while only

27% were understory and treelet species (from the data

presented by Appanah 1985). If seed predator satiation

occurs during mast fruiting years, as Janzen (1974) pre-

dicted, seed predation pressure should vary between

mass fruiting and the intervening lean years (Appanah

1985). Such a difference in seed recruitment would

influence subsequent seedling establishment and ulti-

mately cause a difference in the distribution patterns of

trees between species that fruit in gregarious flowering

years and those that fruit in the intervening lean years.

To examine the density of saplings in relation to dis-

tance from adult trees, the numbers of saplings within a

30 m radius of each adult tree were counted for species

of the emergent and canopy layers, and within a 20 m

radius for understory, treelet, and shrub species. These

radii were determined by the following procedures: the

mean nearest neighbor distance (NND) was calculated

for each species whose adult density was more than 50

individuals in the plot. The NNDs of 95% of the species

were less than 60 m for upper story species (emergent

and canopy) and less than 40 m for lower story species

(understory, treelet, and shrub layers). If sapling dens-

ities are dependent on the distance from the nearest

conspecific adults, then such dependence should be

apparent within the NND. We selected adult trees that

were located at least 60 m away from other conspecific

adults for upper story species and at least 40 m away

from each other for lower story species. The num-

ber of saplings in 2 m increments from each selected

adult tree were counted and sapling density (m

,

2



) was

calculated. Linear and polynomial regression analyses

between sapling density and the distance from conspe-

cific adult trees (D) were performed for each species.

Sapling densities were also linearly regressed against

the logarithm of distance (Ln D). For each species, we

chose from among the various curves fit, the regres-

sion model which yielded the highest coefficient of

determination (R

2

). We classified the sapling distribu-



tion patterns into 3 types; increasing with the distance

from conspecific adults, density peaking in the middle

of the distance range, and decreasing with distance.

We classified the first 2 patterns as the ‘repelled dis-

tribution pattern’ (Condit 1992) since the densities in

both patterns were reduced near the conspecific adults,

while the last pattern was classified as an ‘attracted

distribution pattern’ because the density was usually

highest near conspecific adults.

In addition to the density mentioned above, the

mortality of saplings in relation to distance from the

nearest conspecific adult was obtained in a similar man-

ner for every 2 m interval. Mortality (%) was defined

as the percentage of saplings which died between the

censuses relative to the total number of saplings recor-

ded in the initial census.

In order to express the spatial pattern of saplings

and adults for each species, the index of

I

(Mor-


ishita 1959) was obtained for saplings and adults by

subdividing the plots into rectangular grids with sides

1/2

6

times the lengths of those of the experimental plot



(7

:

8





15

:



6 m) as follows:

I

=



q

X

i=



1

n

i



n

i

,



1

=N


N

,

1







q



;

where


q

is the number of sub-quadrats into which

the rectangular grid is divided,

n

i



is the number of

trees in each sub-quadrat, and

N

is the total num-



ber of trees in the plot (50 ha). The same procedure

was repeated by increasing the size of each sub-plot,

namely, 1

=

2



6



1



=

2

5



, 1

=

2



5



1



=

2

5



, 1

=

2



5



1



=

2

4



, ......,

1

=



2

1





1

=

2



0

. The


I

index is 1 for random distributions,

less than 1 for regular distributions, and greater than

1 for clumped distributions (Morishita 1959). The sig-

nificance of differences of

I

from 1 was determined



by the F-test. Values of

I

for adults, saplings, and all



trees (adults, saplings, and those smaller than adults

but larger than saplings) were plotted at each sub-plot

size. Since we wanted to clarify the differences in local

distribution patterns between adults and saplings, val-

ues of

I

should be compared at the smallest scales.



The distributional pattern of a species was regarded as

clumped if the

I

value was significantly higher than 1



veg10554.tex; 20/06/1997; 11:58; v.7; p.4

159

at more than 3 scaling levels within the first 5 sub-plot

dimensions (from 1

=

2



6



1



=

2

6



to 1

=

2



4



1



=

2

4



).

We classified the species into 4 categories: type-1,

saplings are clumped but adults are random to regular

in distribution; type-2, both saplings and adults are

clumped; type 3, saplings are random to regular but

adults are clumped; type-4, both saplings and adults are

random to regular. Approximately half of the selected

species for the analysis (226 in total) could not be

classified into a group because of the low densities of

adults or saplings in the small quadrats ranging in size

from 1

=

2



12

to 1


=

2

8



times those of the full scale of plot,

which were insufficient for statistical analyses.

To explore how tree dispersion pattern is related to

population size, the correlations between total abund-

ance and

I

were analyzed. For this analysis, the data



for trees all sizes and of every species were considered

together. We predict that if a rare species can exist as

a result of successful escape from density-dependent

mortality, then that species should be distributed ran-

domly or regularly rather than in a clumped pattern.

For each species, the total number of newly

recruited saplings which were recorded in the re-census

and the number of saplings which died between the 2

censuses were obtained. Newly recruited saplings were

those less than or equal to 1 cm DBH at the time of the

initial census, but which grew to be larger than 1 cm

and thus were measured in the re-census. The recruit-

ment rate was defined as the percentage of recruited

saplings in relation to the total number of trees at the

initial census. The mortality (%) used in this analysis

was the same as that obtained in the analysis of sapling

mortality in relation to distance from their conspecific

mother trees. The recruitment rate and mortality were

compared for each species and simple linear regres-

sions between these 2 variables within each group, the

emergent, canopy, understory, and shrub and treelet

strata, were calculated. The presence of outliers in the

data was statistically examined with the method sug-

gested by Grubbs (1969).



Yüklə 434,28 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə