Tronox management pty ltd cooljarloo west titanium minerals


Table 15:  Possible Regional Distribution of Vegetation Types based on Historical Regional Studies



Yüklə 32,99 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə12/102
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü32,99 Mb.
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   102

Table 15: 

Possible Regional Distribution of Vegetation Types based on Historical Regional Studies 

 

VT 



Broad Description 

Reference 

Possible 

Equivalent 

or 

Similar 

Community Type * 

Location 

Wet  Heaths  dominated  by  Banksia,  Melaleuca,  Hakea



and  Calothamnus spp. 

Crook et al. (1984) 

Association  grouping  seasonal  fresh 

water swamps 

Namming NR 

Griffin and Keighery (1989) 

Wet Heaths 

Moore River National Park 

Namming Nature Reserve 

Damp Shrublands dominated by Melaleuca spp. 



Crook et al. (1984) 

Seasonal 

swamps 

with 


variable 

vegetation  including  thicket  to  scrub  of 



Melaleuca spp. 

Eneminga NR 

Occasional  Banksia  prionotes  over  damp  Shrubland  of 



Regelia  ciliata,  Kunzea  glabrescens  or  Verticordia 

densiflora subsp. densiflora 

Crook et al. (1984) 

Heath  association  of  Regelia  ciliata, 

Beaufortia  squarrosa  and  others  with 

patches  of  Banksia  woodland  on  higher 

ground 

Eneminga NR 



ecologia (1998, 2000) 

NA 


DTA 

Shrubland  of  Acacia  saligna  subsp.  lindleyi  and 



Calothamnus quadrifidus over sedges 

Gibson et al. (1994) 

SCP5 (Mixed Shrub Damplands) 

Bassendean 

and 

Pinjarra 



Plain  Landsystems;  majority 

of 


quadrats 

in 


Nature 

Reserves 

Damp  Heaths  dominated  by  Banksia  telmatiaea  and 



Melaleuca seriata 

Griffin and Keighery (1989) 

Wet Heaths 

Moore River National Park 

Namming Nature Reserve 

CALM (1998) 

Soil type possibly represented 

Nambung National Park 

Low Woodland of  Banksia attenuataBanksia menziesii 



and/or Banksia ilicifolia over shrubs on sand 

Gibson et al. (1994) 

 

SCP22 (Banksia ilicifolia Woodlands) 



Mainly 

on 


Bassendean 

Sands;  some  quadrats  in 

State Forest 

Crook et al. (1984) 

 

Low Woodland A of B. attenuata and B. 



menziesii  (occasional  B.  ilicifolia  and  B. 

prionotes

Eneminga NR 

 

Low Woodland A of B. attenuata and B. 



menziesii  (occasional  B.  ilicifolia  and  E. 

todtiana)  over  Low  Heath  D  of  mixed 

species 


Namming NR 

Heaths 



dominated 

by 


Allocasuarina

Hakea

Calothamnus  spp.  and  Xanthorrhoea  preissii  on  sand 

Crook et al. (1984) 

 

Reserve noted to contain low species-rich 



heathlands on sandy and gravelley soils 

Minyulo NR 

 


Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

66. 


VT 

Broad Description 

Reference 

Possible 

Equivalent 

or 

Similar 

Community Type * 

Location 

over laterite  

Reserve  noted  to  contain  sandy  gravels 

on  ridges  supporting  Xanthorrhoea  spp. 

over Low Heathlands 

Reserve 27216 

Griffin and Keighery (1989) 

Laterite Heaths 

Badgingarra National Park 

Upper slope Shrublands on sand over limestone 



Crook et al. (1984) 

 

Inland  Heaths;  Open  Dwarf  Scrub  C  of 



Melaleuca  acerosa,  Acacia  cochlearis 

and Hakea prostrata 

Wanagarren NR 

 

ecologia (1998, 2000) 

NA 

DTA 


CALM (1998) 

Soil type possibly represented 

Nambung National Park 

9a 


Low  Wet  Shrublands  dominated  by  Melaleuca  spp.  in 

clay pan 

Woodman 

Environmental 

(2012b) 

Tall  Shrublands  of  a  mix  of  Melaleuca 



teretifolia and M. rhaphiophylla 

UCL both north and south of 

Study Area 

9b 


Damp  Forest  to  Woodland  of  Eucalyptus  rudis  over 

Melaleuca rhaphiophylla and Acacia saligna 

Gibson et al. (1994) 

 

SCP11 (Wet Forests and Woodlands) 



Sometimes  on  Bassendean 

Sands;  some  quadrats  in 

Nature Reserve 

ecologia (1998,2000) 

NA 


DTA 

10 


Damp  Woodland  of  Banksia  littoralis  and  Melaleuca 

preissiana over sedges 

NA 


NA 

NA 


11 

Open  Damp  Forest  of  Eucalyptus  rudis,  Corymbia 



calophylla,  Melaleuca  spp.  over  sparse  Acacia  spp.  and 

coastal shrubs  

Gibson et al. (1994) 

 

 



SCP11 (Wet Forests and Woodlands) 

Sometimes  on  Bassendean 

Sands;  some  quadrats  in 

Nature Reserve 

Woodman 

Environmental 

(2000) 

F2:    Dense  Low  Forest  of  Melaleuca 



rhaphiophylla and Corymbia calophylla 

Moore River NP 

Woodman 

Environmental 

(2012b) 

 

Eucalyptus rudis and Melaleuca Forest to 

Woodland 

UCL west of Study Area 

Woodman 

Environmental 

(2009d) 

F1: 


Low 

Forest 


of 

Melaleuca 

preissiana,  Eucalyptus  rudis,  Melaleuca 

rhaphiophylla  and  Corymbia  calophylla 

on grey sandy clay. 

Coomallo NR 

CALM (1998) 

Soil type possibly represented 

Nambung National Park 

12 

Shrubland 



of 

Acacia 

saligna 

and 


Melaleuca 

rhaphiophylla on sand with ironstone 

NA 


NA 

NA 


13 

Samphire Shrublands on saline flats 

NA 

NA 


NA 

Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

67. 


VT 

Broad Description 

Reference 

Possible 

Equivalent 

or 

Similar 

Community Type * 

Location 

14 


Woodland  of  Casuarina  obesa  over  Melaleuca  spp.  on 

saline flats 

NA 

NA 


NA 

15 


Low  Woodland  of  Eucalyptus  decipiens  or  Eucalyptus 

foecunda over Acacia spp. on sand over limestone 

Burbidge and Boscacci (1989) 

Site 5 

Southern Beekeepers NR 



CALM (1998) 

Soil type possibly represented 

Nambung National Park 

16 


Sedgelands on non-saline flats 

CALM (1998) 

Soil type possibly represented 

Nambung National Park 

17 

Low  Forest  to  Woodland  of  Bankia  attenuata,  with 



occasional  Banksia  menziesii  and  Eucalyptus  todtiana 

over  shrubs  dominated  by  Adenanthos  cygnorum  and 



Eremaea pauciflora on sand 

Gibson et al. (1994) 

 

SCP23a  (Central  Banksia  attenuata  –  B. 



menziesii Woodlands) and 23b (Northern 

Banksia 

attenuata 

–  B.  menziesii 

Woodlands).   

Mainly 


located 

on 


Bassendean  Sands;  quadrats 

in  State  Forest  and  Nature 

Reserve 

Crook et al. (1984) 

 

Low  Woodland  A  of  B.  attenuata  over 



Thicket/Scrub  of  Adenanthos  cygnorum 

and  Banksia  burdettii  over  Low  Heath 

C/D of varied composition 

Bundarra NR 

Crook et al. (1984) 

 

Inland Woodlands: Open Low Woodland  



A  of  B.  attenuata  over  Low  Scrub  B  of 

mixed species 

Wanagarren NR 

Gibson and Keighery (1989) 

Banksia Woodlands 

Moore River NP 

Namming NR 

ecologia (1998, 2000) 

 

DTA 



Woodman 

Environmental 

(2000) 

W5:  Low Woodland of B. attenuata and 



B.  menziesii  over  mixed  low  shrubs 

dominated  by  Eremaea  pauciflora  on 

grey sand 

Moore River NP 

18 

Low Forest to  Low Woodland of  Banksia attenuata and 



B.  menziesii  with  occasional  Eucalyptus  todtiana  on 

yellow sand on mid-slopes 

Gibson et al. (1994) 

 

SCP20a  (Banksia  attenuata  woodlands 



over species rich Dense Shrublands) and 

SCP28 (Spearwood Banksia attenuata or 



Banksia 

attenuata 

– 

Eucalyptus 

Woodlands). 

Located  on  Spearwood  and 

Bassendean  Sands;  quadrats 

on Crown Land 

Crook et al. (1984) 

 

Low Woodland A of B. attenuata and B. 



menziesii  (occasional  B.  ilicifolia  and  E. 

todtiana)  over  Low  Heath  D  of  mixed 

species 


Namming NR 

Inland Woodlands: Open Low Woodland  

A  of  B.  attenuata  over  Low  Scrub  B  of 

mixed species 

Wanagarren NR 

Gibson and Keighery (1989) 

Banksia Woodlands 

Moore River NP 



Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

68. 


VT 

Broad Description 

Reference 

Possible 

Equivalent 

or 

Similar 

Community Type * 

Location 

Namming Nature Reserve 



ecologia (1998, 2000) 

NA 


DTA 

Woodman 


Environmental 

(2000) 


W5:  Low Woodland of B. attenuata and 

B.  menziesii  over  mixed  low  shrubs 

dominated  by  Eremaea  pauciflora  on 

grey sand 

Moore River NP 

 

 

*Note:  Please see text in Section 4.2.5.3 for further explanation and possibility of VTs of the Study Area matching community descriptions in historical studies. 



 

Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

69. 


5

 

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS 

5.1

 

Flora of the Study Area 

A  total  of  1156  discrete  vascular  plant  taxa  (excluding  hybrids)  have  been  recorded  within 

and immediately adjacent to the Cooljarloo West Study Area, including 1063 native taxa; 573 

of  these  native  taxa  were  recorded  during  surveys  in  2012.    By  comparison,  approximately 

4165 vascular plant taxa (including 3322 native taxa) are noted by FloraBase (DPaW 2013a) 

to  occur  within  the  SWA02  (Swan  Coastal  Plain)  subregion;  approximately  32  %  of  the 

known native flora of this subregion is therefore known within the Study Area.   

 

One  of  the  main  causes  of  the  high  floristic  diversity  within  the  Study  Area  may  be  the 



proximity to the Study Area of the GS03 and SWA01 subregions, reflecting differences in soil 

and  underlying  geology.    As  displayed  in  Appendix  J,  the  location  of  the  Study  Area  may 

represent  extensions  of  the  known  ranges  of  approximately  70  flora  taxa,  including  10  CS 

flora taxa.    Although none of the taxa recorded in the Study  Area  are endemic to  the Study 

Area  itself,  several  have  relatively  small  ranges,  including  Arnocrinum  gracillimum  (P2), 

Baeckea  sp.  Moora  (R.  Bone 1991/1)  (P3),  Grevillea  thelemanniana subsp.  Cooljarloo (B.J. 

Keighery  28  B)  (P1),  Hakea  longiflora  (P3),  Hypocalymma  serrulatum  (P3),  Malleostemon 

sp.  Cooljarloo  (B.  Backhouse  s.n.  16/11/88)  (P1),  Onychosepalum  microcarpum  (P2), 

Onychosepalum nodatum (P3) and Verticordia amphigia (P3) (all less than 100 km).   

 

A large number of CS flora taxa are known to  occur within the Study Area, the majority of 



which  were  historically  known  from  the  area.    Despite  numerous  surveys  historically 

undertaken within the Study Area, five CS flora taxa were newly recorded for the Study Area 

during the 2012 studies.   Collections  of each of these taxa represent  either range extensions 

(Guichenotia  alba  (P3),  Verticordia  huegelii  var.  tridens  (P3)),  further  define  their  known 

ranges  (Allocasuarina  grevillioides  (P3),  Beyeria  cinerea  subsp.  cinerea  (P3)),  or  represent 

further collections of nearby known locations (Hibbertia spicata subsp. leptotheca (P3)).  

 

Considerable  numbers  of  populations  of  listed  T  –  DRF  taxa  are  known  in  the  Study  Area, 



likely  as  a  result  of  the numerous  intensive,  historical  surveys  for  these  taxa  within  suitable 

habitat.    A  total  of  39  Andersonia  gracilis,  22  confirmed  Anigozanthos  viridis  subsp. 



terraspectans  and  24  Macarthuria  keigheryi  populations  are  known  within  the  Study  Area 

(Figure  7.1).    The  majority  of  all  known  populations  of  both  Andersonia  gracilis  and 



Anigozanthos  viridis  subsp.  terraspectans  are  located  in  the  Cooljarloo  area,  however 

approximately half of the Macarthuria keigheryi populations are known outside of this area, 

including within the Perth metropolitan area.  The record of Paracaleana dixonii in the Study 

Area is a new locality, with the majority of populations of this taxon known from sandplain 

areas north of the Study Area. 

 

The preferred habitat of the four threatened flora taxa known within the Study Area covers the 



majority of the Study Area itself, due to the differing habitat requirements of these taxa.   In 

total,  approximately  75.5  %  of  the  Study  Area  comprises  preferred  habitat  for  one  or  more 

Threatened  (DRF)  taxa.    Both  Andersonia  gracilis  and  Anigozanthos  viridis  subsp. 

terraspectans  (T-DRF)  are  very  habitat  specific,  preferring  seasonally  damp  (winter-wet), 

black  sandy  clay  to  grey  sand  to  clay  loam  flats  near  or  on  the  margins  of  swamps  or  in 

depressions.  Although both of these taxa have been recorded in a variety of VTs in the Study 

Area, the preferred habitat of Andersonia gracilis is restricted to VTs 1, 2 and 5 (22.3 % of 



Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

70. 


the Study Area), and the preferred habitat of Anigozanthos viridis subsp. terraspectans is VT 

1 (13.1 % of the Study Area).   

 

Conversely, Macarthuria keigheryi (T-DRF) is historically recorded to grow in winter-damp 



sands  under Banksia  and  Kingia (Brown  et  al. 1998), however it is  more recently known to 

also  occur  on  drier,  sandy  areas,  usually  found  in  areas  recovering  from  fire  or  disturbance.  

The  preferred  habitat  of  this  taxon  (VTs  17  and  18)  equates  to  66.03  %  of  the  Study  Area.  

Likewise, the preferred habitat of Paracaleana dixonii equates to 72.8 % of the Study Area.   

 

There are several poorly known flora taxa in the Study Area: 



 

 



Eremophila  glabra  subsp.  ?carnosa  is  known  from  two  locations  in  the  Study  Area, 

both  in  VT  2.    This  taxon  was  previously  identified  as  Eremophila  glabra  subsp. 



chlorella  (T-DRF);  however,  further  examination  of  specimens  taken  from  these 

locations  by Andrew  Brown has resulted in  a new partial identification.  This  taxon is 

still  of  interest,  as  it  does  not  fit  Eremophila  glabra  subsp.  carnosa,  and  may  in  fact 

represent  a new taxon.    The preferred habitat  for this  taxon is  VT 2, which comprises 

3.1 % of the Study Area.   

 



Diurus  ?eburnea  (P1)  has  been  recorded  in  the  Wongonderrah  Nature  Reserve.    This 

taxon  is  known  from  between  Eneabba  and  Three  Springs  and  therefore  if  this 

identification were to prove correct this would result in a large range extension for this 

poorly known taxon.  It was recorded in VT 10, which comprises of 0.3 % of the Study 

Area.   

 



A single collection of Stylidium carnosum subsp. ?Narrow leaves (J.A. Wege 490) (P1) 

was recorded within the existing Cooljarloo mining area during 2011;   

 

Three locations of Stylidium aceratum (P2) have also been recorded in the Study Area, 



two from  VT 2 and a third from within VT 6 (4.05 % of the Study Area).  Prior to this 

survey, this taxa was known from only one population, in the vicinity of Muchea (150 

km south of the Study Area).   

 



A single specimen of Schoenus badius (P2) was identified from surveys in 2006 in the 

northern  portion  of  the  Study  Area.    The  specimen  has  been  lodged  at  the  Western 

Australian Herbarium under this name, however subsequent survey in 2007 determined 

that  this  specimen  was  more  likely  to  represent  a  slightly  atypical  form  of  the  very 

similar Schoenus pennisetus (P1) (Helena Holdings 2007).   

 

Despite the relatively well surveyed nature of the Study Area, the surveys in 2012 identified a 



significant  number  of  new  taxa  for  the  area  including  five  previously  unrecorded  CS  flora 

taxa.    This  indicates  the  high  species  richness  and  diversity  of  the  vegetation  present  at 

Cooljarloo and suggests that as yet unrecorded taxa are likely to be present. 

5.2

 

Vegetation of the Study Area 

Nineteen  VTs have been mapped  within the Study  Area comprising  of  two  VTs  associated 

with  the  more  common  Banksia  Woodlands  on  sandy  dunal  areas,  and  a  further  17  VTs 

ranging  from  Heaths  to  Woodlands  associated  with  several  drainage  systems  and  braided 

wetlands that transect the Study Area.  The vegetation of the Study Area was found to be in 

primarily Pristine condition despite a very large number of introduced species being recorded. 

 

Statistical  analysis  of  the  floristic  quadrat  data  produced  reasonably  strong  and  distinct 



groupings  in  general.    However,  a  large  number  of  quadrats  were  manually  allocated  to 

Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

71. 


different groups as a result of inappropriate positioning in the field and other factors such as 

mosaics of soil and hydrological conditions.   

 

Assessment  of  local  conservation  significance  of  the  VTs  of  the  Study  Area  assigned  the 



majority of VTs a Moderate local conservation significance ranking, comprising 78.1 % of the 

Study  Area.    Eight  VTs  (comprising  11.0  %  of  the  Study  Area)  were  assigned  a  local 

conservation significance ranking of High, and a further eight VTs (3.2 % of the Study Area) 

were assigned a local conservation significance ranking of Very High.   These rankings were 

based  on  a  combination  of  preferred  habitat  for  Threatened  flora  taxa  and  mapped  extent 

through  the  Study  Area.    It  must  be  noted  that  of  the  eight  VTs  with  a  local  conservation 

significance  of  Very  High,  six  of  them  (VTs  3,  4,  11,  14,  15  and  16)  have  highly  restricted 

distributions within the Study Area (occupying <0.1 % of the Study Area).  The presence of 

T-DRF  taxa  within  some  of  the  VTs  increased  the  conservation  significance,  particularly 

where  the  VT  formed  preferred  habitat  for  particular  taxa.    As  stated  previously, 

approximately 75.5 % of the Study Area comprises preferred habitat for one or more T-DRF 

taxa  indicating  that  the  vegetation  of  the  Study  Area  in  general  is  of  relatively  high 

conservation value.   

 

There is no regional dataset against which to accurately compare the VTs of the Study Area in 



order  to  determine  their  regional  extent  and  significance,  as  the  closest  relevant  study  was 

undertaken  south  of  the  Study  Area.    In  reviewing  the  Swan  Coastal  Plain  studies  it  was 

concluded  that  few  similarities  exist  between  the  Study  Area  and  the  vegetation  of  the 

Southern Swan Coastal Plain and that additional work to resolve differences and similarities is 

required before a comprehensive understanding of regional representation of vegetation types 

can be reached. 

 

Comparison  of  the  VTs  against  several  historical  regional  survey  reports  in  the  region 



indicates that many of these VTs are likely to be represented in conservation reserve outside 

of the Study Area.  VTs 12, 13, 14 and 16 are not known in conservation estate outside of the 

Study Area, and therefore their regional conservation significance is assumed to be high.  In 

particular,  VT  14  is  considered  to  be  of  high  regional  conservation  status,  as  it  shows 

affinities  with  Casuarina  obesa  woodlands  which  were  noted  by  Keighery  and  Keighery 

(1992)  as  being  highly  restricted  in  the  northern  Swan  Coastal  Plain.    There  are  no  listed 

TECs or PECs known in the Study Area, and none of the VTs mapped in the Study Area can 

be correlated to listed TECs or PECs. 

 

 

 


1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   102




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə