Tronox management pty ltd cooljarloo west titanium minerals



Yüklə 32,99 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/102
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü32,99 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   102

2.

 

BACKGROUND  

2.1

 

Climate 

The Study Area is located within the Swan Coastal Plain region in the South-West of Western 

Australia,  near  the  border  of  the  Northern  Sandplains  region.    The  area  experiences  a  dry, 

warm Mediterranean climate with predominantly winter rainfall (300 – 500 mm) and seven to 

eight dry months per year (Beard 1990).  The long term average precipitation for Dandaragan 

West  (approximately  15  km  east  of  the  Cooljarloo  minesite)  is  604.3  mm  (years  1953  – 

2012); mean yearly rainfall at this station has not exceeded the mean in the years 2000 – 2012 

(Bureau of Meterology (BOM) (2013). 

 

Figure  2  displays  average  monthly  maximum  and  minimum  temperatures,  and  average 



monthly  rainfall  (data  from  1990  –  2012  for  rainfall  data  and  2005  –  2011  for  temperature 

data),  recorded  for  Cooljarloo  West  (Tronox  2013a).    The  highest  average  maximum 

temperature  at  Cooljarloo  West  occurs  in  January  and  February  (approximately  34 

C)  and 



the  lowest  average  minimum  temperature  is  experienced  in  July  (18.8 

C).    The  average 



annual  rainfall  for  this  station  is  approximately  549  mm.    Average  monthly  rainfall  peaks 

from May to August with July receiving the highest level of rainfall (109.3 mm). 

 

 

 



Figure 2: 

Mean  Maximum  and  Minimum  Temperatures  (



Celsius)  and  Mean 

Rainfall (mm) for Cooljarloo West (Tronox 2013a) 

0

20



40

60

80



100

120


Jan

Feb


Mar

Apr


May

Jun


Jul

Aug


Sep

Oct


Nov

Dec


Rainfall (mm)

Max. Temp. °C

Min. Temp. °C


Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

6.



 

2.2

 

Geology, Soils and Landforms 

The Study Area is located within the Perth Basin, which extends from the Murchison River to 

the south coast  of Western Australia, and is  defined on the eastern boundary by the Darling 

Fault, with the western boundary lying under the continental slope.  The Perth Basin contains 

a Silurian to  Pleistocene sedimentary  succession.  According to Mory  and  Iasky  (1996), the 

onshore Perth Basin is divided into 13 structural units, with the Study Area occurring on the 

Cadda Terrace and the Coomallo Trough units, which lie to the west of the Eneabba Fault.   

 

Much  of  the  Perth  Basin  is  mantled  by  Quaternary  deposits,  up  to  75  m  in  thickness, 



comprising  mainly  of  laterite  and  associated  eluvial  sand,  coastal  limestone  and  associated 

dune  sands,  lake  and  swamp  deposits,  alluvium  and  colluvium  (Playford  et  al.  1975).    The 

Study  Area  is  located  on  the  Swan  Coastal  Plain  physiographic  unit,  which  is  comprised  of 

four  north-south  oriented  systems;  the  Study  Area  located  on  the  Bassendean  Dune  System 

(Mory and Iasky 1996).  The Bassendean Dunes represents a belt of coastal dunes and other 

associated  shoreline  deposits  with  local  concentrations  of  heavy-mineral  sands,  the 

identification of which from surface features is virtually impossible (Mory and Iasky (1996).  

This  system  is  composed  of  Bassendean  Sands,  which  are  almost  completely  leached  of 

calcium  carbonate,  represented  by  subdued  hummocks  of  quartz  sand  with  intervening 

swamps (Playford et al. 1975).   

 

Figure  3  displays  the  approximate  Study  Area  boundary  atop  the  Dongara  Hill  River 



Geological  Survey  Map  (Lowry  et  al.  1969).    The  majority  of  the  Study  Area  consists  of 

Bassendean  Sand  comprising  ancient  coastal  quartz-sand  dunes,  scattered  with  areas  of 

swamp and lacustrine deposits of sand, clay and diatomite.  A small section in the south-east 

of the Study Area consists of alluvium with sand, silt and clay with the very north-east corner 

consisting of colluvium with quartz sand.  Small areas of ferruginous laterite are also present 

in this section of the Study Area.  The south western corner of the Study Area is comprised of 

coastal limestone covered by residual quartz sand with occasional patches of eolian limestone 

and kankar (Lowry et al. 1969). 

 

At  Cooljarloo  West,  the main  stratigraphic  units  in  terms  of  influence  on  vegetation  are  the 



Bassendean  Sands  and  the  Guildford  Formation.    The  Bassendean  Sands  are  generally 

between  1  –  3  m  in  thickness,  consisting  of  very  fine  to  coarse  grained,  well  sorted  quartz 

sand  with  some  organic  material;  seasonal  wetting  and  perching  was  indicated  by  moisture 

recorded in the sandy horizons as well as the presence of mottled clays at the base of this unit 

(Worley Parsons 2013).  This layer is underlain by the Guildford Formation, which consists of 

blue-grey to brown silty to slightly sandy clay, which can be separated into an upper clayey 

facies  (maximum  thickness  27  m)  and  a  lower  sandier  facies  (nominally  to  22  m  thickness) 

(Worley Parsons 2013).  The upper clay facies acts as an aquitard, with a perched water table 

above this unit; however, although the permeability of the clay facies  is generally low, there 

are  areas  with  significantly  higher  hydraulic  conductivity  where  sandier  portions  of  the 

Guildford Formation occur (Worley Parsons 2013); these sand lenses may form an important 

function in terms of soil moisture availability for vegetation (Syrinx 2013). 



Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

7.



 

 

 



Figure 3: 

Geology of the Cooljarloo West Study Area (Lowry 

et al. 1969) 

 

2.3



 

Regional Vegetation 

The  vegetation  of  the  region  was  initially  mapped  at  a  broad  scale  (1:250  000)  by  Beard 

during  the  1970’s.    This  dataset  has  formed  the  basis  of  several  regional  mapping  systems, 

including physiographic regions defined by Beard (1979); the biogeographical region dataset 

(IBRA) for Western Australia (Department of the Environment (DoE) 2013a); and vegetation 

system associations which are currently used to determine extents of clearing since European 

arrival (Government of Western Australia 2013). 

2.3.1   Regional Vegetation Mapping by Beard (1979; 1990) 

The  Study  Area  is  located  in  the  Drummond  Subdistrict  of  the  Darling  Botanical  District 

(Swan Coastal Plain Subregion) (Beard 1979), the northern boundary of which is the northern 

limit of Banksia Low Woodland (Beard 1990).  It traverses four physiographic systems within 

this subdistrict: the Bassendean, Guilderton, Jurien and  Lesueur Systems (depicted in Figure 

5).  The Study Area is comprised predominantly of the Bassendean System with small areas 

of the Guilderton and Jurien Systems in the south-west and the Lesueur System in the north-

east and south-east, reflecting the geological composition described in Section 2.2. 

 

The  Bassendean  System  is  a  flat  undulating  plain  with  low  ridges  of  bleached  sand 



interspersed with swampy flats underlain by calcareous soils.  On well drained soils  Banksia 

woodlands are dominant, with trees ranging from 3 – 6 m in height.  Beard noted that in the 

Banksia Low Woodlands there was considerable consistency in the overstorey, but less so in 

the understory (pg. 34, Beard 1979).  The swampy areas give rise to heaths of a mix of species 

including Acacia lasiocarpaMelaleuca acerosaBanksia telmatiaeaCalytrix aureaCalytrix 

flavescens,  Verticordia  densiflora  and  Verticordia  drummondii.    Samphires  and  Frankenia 

spp.  are  found  within  salt  pans,  whereas  deeper  swamps  typically  consist  of  woodlands  of 



Melaleuca  rhaphiophylla,  Eucalyptus  rudis  and  Banksia  littoralis  over  species  such  as 

Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

8.



 

Hypocalymma  angustifolium,  Acacia  rostellifera,  Melaleuca  thyoides  and  Casuarina  obesa 

(Beard 1979). 

 

The Guilderton System features the recent sand dunes of the coastal belt and is the northern 



extension  of  the  Quindalup  Dunes  of  the  Swan  Coastal  Plain.    The  dunes  consist  of  white 

sands succeeded by thickets of Acacia cyclops.  In areas with frequent burning the vegetation 

is typically heath or low scrub dominated by Acacia lasiocarpa and Melaleuca acerosa.  On 

flats and interdunes the vegetation climaxes to thickets of Allocasuarina lehmanniana and on 

salt  flats  saltbush,  samphire  and  Melaleuca  thyoides  are  dominant.    Unvegetated  drift  sands 

are a feature within the Guilderton System (Beard 1979). 

 

The  Jurien  System  is  located  within  the  older  coastal  limestone  belt  and  is  the  northern 



extension  of  the  Spearwood  Dunes  on  the  Swan  Coastal  Plain.    The  vegetation  is  typically 

Banksia  prionotes  Woodland  over  tall  shrubs  such  as  Dryandra  (now  Banksia)  sessilis  and 

Calothamnus  quadrifidus.    Patches  of  Acacia  spathulata  Heath  are  found  on  shallow  soils, 

Banksia  Woodlands  on  deep  white  sands  and  stunted  Eucalyptus  gomphocephala  in 

depressions (Beard 1979). 

 

The Lesueur System includes prominent breakaway slopes (up to 100 m high) and flat-topped 



mesas  of  exposed  sandstone  and  siltstone,  with  flanking  mature  gullies  of  mainly  shallow 

colluvial  sand  and  gravel  with  some  areas  of  yellow,  sandy  clay  over  weathered  sandstone. 

The  vegetation  is  dominated  by  Low  to  Moderate  Heath  of  Banksia  attenuata,  B.  menziesii 

and  Eucalyptus  todtiana,  up  to  2  m  high  on  the  mesas  and  up  to  0.5  m  on  slopes  and 

breakaways.    Drainage  channels  and  gullies  ranging  from  coarse-sand  to  yellow  (mottled) 

sandy-clay  soils  support  low  heath  with  a  diverse  range  of  dominant  species  including 



Verticordia  densiflora,  Calothamnus  hirsutus,  Eucalyptus  rudis,  Melaleuca  rhaphiophylla, 

Acacia saligna, Hakea neurophylla and H. undulata (Beard 1979). 

2.3.2   IBRA Regions 

Beard  mapped  the  phytogeographic  regions  of  Western  Australia  based  on  natural 

delineations in vegetation and landscape, divisible into regions and further broken down in to 

Botanical  Districts.    The  boundaries  of  Western  Australia’s  IBRA  (Interim  Biogeographic 

Regionalisation  for  Australia)  regions  are  broadly  compatible  with  those  of  Beard’s 

phytogeographic regions.  Figure 4 presents the location of the Study Area in relation to the 

IBRA mapping. 

 

The  Study  Area  is  located  in  the  northern  extent  of  the  Swan  Coastal  Plain  IBRA  Region, 



specifically  the  SWA02  –  Swan  Coastal  Plain  Subregion  (DoE  2013a).    The  SWA02 

Subregion  is  characterised  by  colluvial  and  aeolian  sand,  alluvial  river  flats  and  coastal 

limestone,  with  vegetation  generally  featuring  heath  and/or  Tuart  Woodlands  on  limestone, 

Banksia and Jarrah-Banksia Woodlands on Quaternary marine dunes, and Marri on colluvial 

and alluvials, and includes a complex series of wetlands. Within this subregion there are areas 

of a high degree of ecosystem and species diversity, notably on the eastern side of the coastal 

plain.    It  has  also  been  noted  that  although  there  has  been  quadrat-based  floristic  survey 

throughout the subregion, the floristics of the northern half of the subregion has not been as 

well surveyed as the southern half, and a systematic and consolidated analysis of floristic data 

is required throughout (Mitchell et al. 2002).   

 

The  SWA02  Subregion  is  bordered  by  the  GES02  –  Lesueur  Sandplain  Subregion  to  the 



north-east,  in  close  proximity  to  the  Study  Area,  with  the  SWA01  –  Dandaragan  Plateau 

Subregion  further  to  the  east/north-east  (DoE  2013a;  Beard  1979).    GES02  contains  mainly 



Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

9.



 

proteaceous  scrub-heaths  (kwongan)  which  are  rich  in  endemics  on  undulating  lateritic 

sandplain,  and  exhibits  high  floristic  endemism  (Desmond  and  Chant  2001).    SWA01  is 

characterised  by  Banksia  Low  Woodland,  Jarrah-Marri  Woodland  and  Marri  Woodland  and 

Scrub-heath on laterite pavement and gravelley sandplains (Desmond 2001).    

2.3.3   Vegetation System Associations 

Shepherd  et  al.  (2002)  mapped  and  described  vegetation  system  associations  related  to 

physiognomy,  expanding  on  mapping  originally  undertaken  by  Beard  (1979),  at  a  scale  of 

1:250,000.   These vegetation  system  associations  were  further refined in 2012  (Government 

of  Western  Australia  2013).    The  Study  Area  traverses  five  such  vegetation  system 

associations as presented in Table 1 and in Figure 5.  Table 1 also presents the current extent 

of  each  vegetation  system  association  in  relation  to  the  pre-European  extent,  and  the  extent 

within  Department  of  Parks  and  Wildlife-managed  (DPaW)  lands  (formerly  Department  of 

Environment and Conservation), including conservation reserves.   

 

Table 1: 



Extent  of  Vegetation  Associations  within  the  Study  Area  (Government  of 

Western Australia 2013) 

 

Vegetation 



System 

Association 

Description 

Current 

Extent (ha) 

Percentage of 

Pre-

European 

Extent 

Remaining 

Percentage 

of Current 

Extent 

Reserved in 

DPaW-

Managed 

Lands 

Bassendean – 

1030 

Low  Woodland;  Banksia  attenuata  & 



Banksia menziesii 

80 264.2 

69.2 

13.8 


Bassendean – 

1031 


Mosaic: Shrublands; Hakea scrub-heath / 

Shrublands;  Dryandra  (now  Banksia) 

heath 

 

402.7 



8.3 

0.0 


Guilderton – 1026 

Mosaic:  Shrublands;  Acacia  rostellifera



A.  cyclops  (in  the  south)  &  Melaleuca 

cardiophylla  (in  the  north)  thicket  / 

Shrublands; 



Acacia 

lasiocarpa 



Melaleuca acerosa heath 

54 993.7 

93.7 


54.8 

Jurien – 1029 

Bare areas; drift sand 

48 699.2 

71.5 

34.9 


Lesueur - 1031 

Mosaic: Shrublands; Hakea Scrub-heath / 

Shrublands;  Dryandra  (now  Banksia) 

Heath 


 

73 884.5 

32.8 

37.6 


 

A  30  %  threshold  level  as  the  proportion  of  a  vegetation  community  below  which  the 

community  is  considered  at  risk  of  decline  has  been  set  by  the  EPA  (EPA  2000).    The 

vegetation  system  associations  present  in  the  Study  Area  have  >30  %  of  the  pre-european 

mapped extents remaining, with the exception of Bassendean – 1031 which has only just over 

8  %  of  the  original  extent  remaining  (Table  1).    This  vegetation  system  association  occurs 

within  the  Study  Area  along  the  southern  edge  of  the  existing  Cooljarloo  mining  area;  the 

majority of the pre-european extent of this vegetation system association occurred to the east 

of  the  Study  Area  and  was  cleared  for  agriculture.    The  extent  of  each  vegetation  system 

association currently reserved for conservation present within the Study Area range from just 

over  half  the  current  extent  reserved  (Guilderton  –  1026),  to  none  of  the  current  extent 

reserved (Bassendean – 1031). 



Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

10.



 

2.3.4   Ecological Communities 

The DPaW Threatened Ecological Communities (TEC) and Priority Ecological Communities 

(PEC) databases were interrogated (April 2013) for information regarding any occurrences of 

TECs or PECs within or in the vicinity (10 km buffer) of the Study Area (DEC 2013a).  There 

are  no  known  occurrences  within  the  Study  Area;  however,  one  TEC  and  one  PEC  occur 

within 2 km of the boundary of the search area:  

 



 



TEC-018:  Stromatolite  community  of  stratified  hypersaline  coastal  lake  -  Lake  Thetis 

(Vulnerable); and 

 

PEC-006  (Swan):  Claypans  with  mid  dense  shrublands  of  Melaleuca  lateritia  over 



herbs  (Priority  1)  (also  listed  as  Critically  Endangered  under  the  Environmental 

Protection  and  Biodiversity  Conservation  Act  1999  (EPBC  Act),  as  part  of 

Commonwealth TEC 121: Claypans of the Swan Coastal Plain). 

 

TEC-018 is restricted to Lake Thetis, which is approximately 30 km to the north-west of the 



Study Area (1 km to the east of the township of Cervantes).  PEC-006 is known from various 

small locations through the south-west, the nearest of which in relation to the Study Area is 

located  at  Lake  Walyengarra,  which  is  approximately  10  km  south  of  the  Study  Area.  

Appendix A presents definitions, categories and criteria for TECs and PECs (DEC 2010).  

 

The Study Area is located within the Minyulo and Mimegarra Wetland Suites as defined by 



Semeniuk  (1994).    The  Minyulo  Suite  is  located  in  the  vicinity  of  Mullering  Brook  and 

consists of a series of sumplands, damplands and creeks within the Bassendean System.  The 

creek transports sediment and flushes water from the associated floodplains and palusplains.  

The  presence  of  an  undisturbed  buffer  of  vegetation  surrounding  the  Mullering  Brook 

enhances the biological values of this Suite. 

 

The  Mimegarra  Suite  is  represented  north  of  private  property  located  north  of  Woolka  Rd.  



This Suite is locally significant as it contains a number of seasonal freshwater sumplands and 

damplands  within  a  generally  water  deficient  area  (Semeniuk  1994).    The  basins  provide 

habitat nodes for fauna, with the undisturbed vegetation which surrounds the majority of these 

basins  providing  hydrological  buffers.    Both  the  Minyulo  Brook  and  Mullering  Brooks  are 

considered to be locally to regionally significant (Semeniuk 1994).   

 

Biodiversity  hotspots  are  areas  that  support  natural  ecosystems  that  are  largely  intact  and 



where native species and communities associated with these ecosystems are well represented; 

they are also areas with a high diversity of locally endemic species, which are species that are 

not  found  or  are  rarely  found  outside  the  hotspot  (DoE  2013b).    The  Southwest  Australia 

Hotspot  is  comprised  of  the  Southwestern  Botanical  Province,  and  includes  2  948  endemic 

species;  the  forest,  woodlands,  shrublands  and  heaths  of  this  area  are  characterised  by  high 

endemism  among  both  plants  and  reptiles  (Conservation  International  2013);  in  addition, 

some areas within the Swan Coastal Plain subregion are of known high ecosystem and species 

diversity (Mitchell et al. 2002).   

 

Along  with  occurring  in  proximity  to  the  junction  of  several  land  systems  and  vegetation 



associations, the Study Area is located approximately 60 km south of the Mt Lesueur/Eneabba 

Biodiversity Hotspot, which is one of fifteen Australian hotspots recognised by the Australian 

Government in 2003.  This area is known to support a large number of distinct, species-rich 

and endemic communities (DoE 2013b). 



Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

11.



 

2.4

 

Regional Flora 

Numerous  flora  studies  have  been  undertaken  throughout  the  region,  providing  good 

contextual information regarding flora taxa known of the region and their distribution.  On a 

regional scale, a total of 624 taxa were recorded in a study of vegetation between the Moore 

River and Jurien (Griffin and Keighery 1989); 2 847 flowering vascular plant taxa (including 

1964  native  taxa)  were  subsequently  recorded  in  649  sites  in  the  northern  sandplain  region 

between  Geraldton  and  Perth  (Griffin  1994).    It  was  noted  by  Griffin  and  Keighery  (1989) 

that it is likely that the flora in the northern sandplains region represents one fifth of the flora 

of Western Australia.  Current regional information on FloraBase (DPaW 2013a) shows that 

approximately 4 165 current vascular plant taxa are known in the SWA02 subregion, of which 

3 322 are native taxa.   



Yüklə 32,99 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   102




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə