Uk overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies: 2011 Biodiversity snapshot



Yüklə 1,56 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix01.08.2017
ölçüsü1,56 Mb.

UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies: 2011 Biodiversity snapshot

39

6

British Virgin Islands



Summer Programme © BVI National Trust 

Between latitudes 18° 26’ N and 18° 44’ N 

and longitudes 64° 20’ W and 64° 37’ W


Author: 

Conservation and Fisheries

Department, Government of the

Virgin Islands

More information available at -

www.bvidef.org 

British Virgin Islands

Basic facts and Figures

Location

Area

Number of islands

Population

Topography

Main economic

sectors

The British Virgin Islands is located within the Eastern Caribbean between

latitudes 18° 26’ N and 18° 44’ N and longitudes 64° 20’ W and 64° 37’ W.

153km


2

.  The four main islands are Tortola (54km

2

), Anegada (38km



2

),

Virgin Gorda (21km



2

) and Jost van Dyke (9km

2

).

The BVI consists of 60 small islands, cays and rocks. 



29,537 inhabitants (est.) 2010

Most islands are hilly with steep slopes (uplifted submerged volcanoes)

except for Anegada, the northernmost island of the BVI, which is a coral

limestone platform.

The main economic activities are financial services and tourism, with

yachting being an important sector within the latter industry. Tortola is the

most developed.

40

UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies: 2011 Biodiversity snapshot



Road Town

0

14Km



UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies: 2011 Biodiversity snapshot

41

Legislative and Policy Framework

Multilateral environmental agreements

The BVI is included in regional and international multilateral environmental agreements

(MEAs). Status of ratification of key MEAs: See also Appendix 1.

Multilateral Environmental 

Agreement

Convention on Biological Diversity

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species

Convention on Migratory Species

Ramsar Convention on Wetlands

World Heritage Convention



Included in 

ratification?















National environmental legislation

The BVI has nine pieces of legislation dealing with protected areas, species protection and

conservation.  See Appendix 2 for more details.

National environmental strategies 

BVI has three main biodiversity related plans and policies for the entire territory as well as a

Biodiversity Action Plan for Anegada, which is the second largest island in the BVI.  An

environmental profile for Jost Van Dyke was also completed in 2009.  See Appendix 3 for

more details.

Protected Areas 

The Government of the Virgin Islands, Ministry of Natural Resources and Labour has

developed a well-structured system of marine and terrestrial protected areas. Terrestrial

areas consist of national parks, bird sanctuaries, wetlands / salt ponds, forestry and

watershed protected areas. Currently, the BVI National Parks Trust manages 19 land-based

national parks (five of which are bird sanctuaries) and one marine park.  The Conservation

and Fisheries Department manages 14 fisheries protected areas and Agriculture

Department manages six watershed protected areas and one forestry protected area. A

detailed breakdown of designated protected areas is included in Appendix 4.

Research Priorities

Investigations to identify Red Hind Epinephelus guttatus spawning sites within the 



British Virgin Islands. Red Hind is an important commercial fish species in the territory 

and thus, this information will be used to assist in the management of the fish stock. 

Mapping of the distribution of all important, endangered and endemic organisms within 



the British Virgin Islands (Biodiversity profile mapping). This information will assist with 

other projects such as habitat monitoring programmes.

Identify and develop actions that can affect the status of invasive species in the BVI 



and restore invaded habitats (Invasive species control). See also Appendix 5.

42

UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies: 2011 Biodiversity snapshot



Institutional Arrangements

Government: The Ministry of Natural Resources and Labour is the main agency that

manages land in the Territory, both directly and through its Departments of Agriculture,

Conservation and Fisheries, National Parks Trust, Survey and Land Registry. In addition the

Town and Country Planning Department, under the Premier’s Office manages all

development within the Territory.

The National Parks Trust of the Virgin Islands is a Statutory Body that is legally responsible

for managing the protected areas system of the BVI. The National Parks Ordinance (1978

revision) established the National Parks Trust, and provided for the creation of national

parks as protected areas to be managed by the Trust. They also proposed the 2007 – 2017

System Plan, in which more protected areas were proposed.



Non-Governmental Organisation: There are a number of environmental NGO’s in the BVI

including the Jost Van Dyke Preservation Society (JVDPS); the Virgin Islands Environmental

Council (VIEC); the Caribbean Youth Environmental Network BVI Chapter (CYEN-BVI

Chapter) and Green VI. See also Appendix 6.



Ecosystems and Habitats

Terrestrial:  The islands’ vegetation is predominantly made up of cacti, thickets and dry

forests. There are also rain forests on the upper slopes of the larger islands of Tortola and

Virgin Gorda (Petit and Prudent 2008). Also present within the BVI are woodlands and

shrublands.



Marine:  The BVI has 380km² of coral reefs that range in size from small fragments of a few

square metres to The Anegada reef which is made up of close to 77km² of coral (Smith

2000). Anegada is also the home of the Anegada Horseshoe reef which is the third largest

Horseshoe Reef © BVI National Trust



UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies: 2011 Biodiversity snapshot

43

barrier reef in the world. The archipelago also has 580 hectares of mangroves (of which

75% are found in Anegada) (Sanders 2006). There are also sea grasses, sandy stretches,

salt ponds, ghuts and sub-marine hills and vales (Petit and Prudent 2008).  



Species

The British Virgin Islands supports approximately 45 plant species endemic to the Puerto

Rican bank (Sanders 2006). This includes single-island endemics including the threatened

Acacia anegadensis and Metastelma anegadense (in Anegada) and Calyptranthes

kiaerskovii (in Virgin Gorda). Other Red Listed species include the Cordia rupicola and

Leptocereus quadricostatus (in Anegada).  One quarter of the 24 reptiles and amphibians

are endemic. Among them the Anegada rock iguana Cyclura pinguis is only found on the

Island of Anegada.



Critically

endangered

Endangered

Vulnerable

Near 

Threatened 

Extinct

(Extinct in

the wild)

Lower risk/

conservation

dependent

Data

Deficient

14

10



18

17

0



2

14

Summary of the 2008 IUCN red listed species for the British Virgin Islands



Threats

Threats to biodiversity in the BVI include natural disasters as well as man-made factors.

Some of the more common threats to biodiversity include habitat loss/fragmentation,

sedimentation, anchor damage, marine pollution, insensitive development, climate change

and invasive species.

Invasive species:  The BVI have a considerable amount of invasive species within its small

domain. Terrestrially the Cuban tree frog, Mongoose and feral rats and cats are becoming a

great nuisance to the environment. In the marine environment, the newly introduced Lion

fish is causing a great impact on marine animals and thus the fisheries industry.  All these

invasive species threaten the growth and survival of native organisms. 

Climate change:  Climate Change brings a series of impacts globally; the BVI expects

higher temperatures and increase in hurricane and flood events. These events will cause

considerable impact on both the terrestrial and marine environments. The increase in

temperatures will put 20% to 30% of local plant species at greater risk of extinction in

addition to encouraging bleaching events of one of our tourist attractions; the coral reefs.

Hurricanes and flooding events also puts animals and other plant species at high risk of

danger due to habitat loss and increase of diseases among livestock and plants (Burnett

Penn 2010).



Habitat loss / fragmentation:  Over the years, the BVI has undergone increased

developmental activities which have resulted in habitat loss and fragmentation. 

See also Appendix 7. 


Projects

The British Virgin Islands has undertaken a number of terrestrial and marine projects over

the last five years.

44

UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies: 2011 Biodiversity snapshot



Case Study:  Enhancing the Capacity to Combat the Imminent

Invasion of Lionfish in the BVI 

Dates: 2009 onwards

The Lionfish (Pterois volitans) eradication project was initiated in 2009 after the

Conservation and Fisheries Department received funding from JNCC. This project

provides a framework to coordinate activities among government and non-

governmental agencies and local businesses and organisations to prevent the lionfish

from negatively impacting the Virgin Islands fisheries, marine ecosystems and

endangering public safety. 

Main outcomes:

To control the invasion of lionfish and suppress the local populations in local waters,

the Department trained persons through a series of workshops and educated the

public on the invasive species through brochures, signage and media/public

announcements.

Diving © BVI National Trust.



UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies: 2011 Biodiversity snapshot

45

Contacts

Mrs Janice Rymer

Acting Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Natural Resources and Labour

Mr Bertrand Lettsome

Chief Conservation and Fisheries Officer

Conservation and Fisheries Department

Mr Kelvin Penn

Deputy Conservation and Fisheries Officer

Conservation and Fisheries Department

Mr Joseph Smith Abbott

Director


National Parks Trust of the Virgin Islands

Mrs Esther Georges

Deputy Director

National Parks Trust of the Virgin Islands

Mr. Bevin Brathwaite

Chief Agricultural Officer

Agriculture Department

Mangrove © BVI National Trust



Bibliography

Burnett Penn, Angela. 2005. 

The Terrestrial Biodiversity of the Virgin Islands.

Burnett Penn, Angela. 2010. 

The Virgin Islands Climate Change Green Paper.

Conservation and Fisheries Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Labour.

GeoHack, Anegada. Accessed 25th March, 2001.

http://toolserver.org/~geohack/geohack.php?pagename=Anegada¶ms=18_44_N_64_20_W_

GeoHack, Norman Islands. Accessed 25th March, 2011.

http://toolserver.org/~geohack/geohack.php?pagename=Norman_Island¶ms=18_19_N_64_37_W_

GeoHack, Little Tobago, British Virgin Islands. Accessed 25th March, 2011.

http://toolserver.org/~geohack/geohack.php?pagename=Little_Tobago,_British_Virgin_Islands¶ms=18_26_N_64_51_W_type:isle_source:GNS-enwiki

http://www.bviddm.com/document-center/System%20Plan%202008%20-%20Approved%20Version.pdf

http://www.bvidef.org/main/ media/NEAP_Draft.pdf 

http://www.cep.unep.org/pubs/meetingreports/LBS%20ISTAC%20III/english/NEMS.doc

www.cepal.org/publicaciones/xml/8/5608/lcl1440i.pdf

http://www.bvidef.org/main/media/NIDSIntPolicies.pdf.

www.seaturtle.org/mtrg/projects/anegada/Anegada%20BAP. pdf

http://www.reunion2008.eu/pdf/en/Pages%20from%2042.10_LOW_FINAL_book_EN-3.pdf

National Parks Trust. 2007. 

British Virgin Islands Protected Areas System Plan 2007-2017

Appendices

All Appendices referred to in this chapter are available at 

http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/page 5748

46

UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies: 2011 Biodiversity snapshot



Document Outline



Yüklə 1,56 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə