Urban design and landscape strategy report



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STIRLING CITY

 

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URBAN DESIGN AND LANDSCAPE STRATEGY REPORT

105


5.0

DETAILED ELEMENTS



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One of the aims of the UDLS is to 

establish a standard palette of Urban 

Elements and materials. These are 

intended as a guide to inform the 

intended quality and character. 

The materials for the public realm 

of the Stirling City Centre have been 

considered in a holistic manner in 

order to achieve a cohesive and 

consistent public realm. 

Materials and finishes have been 

chosen to reflect and support 

the broad identity of a city, while 

strengthening the individual identity 

of each Character Precinct. They 

assist in providing clear, simple, 

legible streets and safe, robust, high 

quality and unique public spaces.

While the general arrangement of 

each street and open space typology 

varies, they typically have similar 

components.  

This section of the UDLS is to be used 

as a reference when designing Urban 

Elements of the Stirling City Centre. It 

provides a rationale and design intent 

to support the material selection.

This section includes guidance on the 

following Urban Elements:

 ▪ Street trees;

 ▪ Park trees;

 ▪ Vegetation;

 ▪ Surface treatments;

 ▪ Street furniture;

 ▪ Footpath alfresco areas;

 ▪ Public art; and

 ▪ Features - playgrounds and water 

features.


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Locally Native

Native


Deciduous

Eucalyptus gomphocephala

Agonis flexuosa

Angophora costata

Brachychiton populneus

Casuarina obesa

Corymbia citriodora

Corymbia maculata

Eucalyptus kondininensis

Eucalyptus patens

Eucalyptus spathulata

Melaleuca quinquenervia

Celtis australis

Fraxinus excelsior

Fraxinus raywoodii

Gleditsia tricanthos (Shademaster)

Jacaranda mimosifolia

Liquidambar formosana

Liquidambar styraciflua

Platanus orientalis var insularis

Ulmus parvifolia

Indicative Structure Street Tree Species List

Indicative Accent Trees and Group Planting Species List

Locally Native

Native

Deciduous



Allocasuarina fraseriana

Banksia attenuata

Banksia grandis

Banksia littoralis

Corymbia calophylla

Eucalyptus marginata

Eucalyptus todtiana

Melaleuca preissiana

Melaleuca raphiophylla

Agonis flexuosa (Burgundy)

Melaleuca styphelioides

Corymbia ficifolia

Hakea laurina

Banksia prionotes

Eucalyptus cornuta

Lagerstroemia indica

Pyrus calleryana cultivars

Sapium sebiferum

Robinia pseudoacacia (Frisia)

Locally Native

Native

Eucalyptus gomphocephala

Ficus hillli

Ficus rubiginosa

Indicative Gateway Trees Species List

Structure Tree

Platanus acerfolia

Indicative Urban Place Street Trees Species List

Note: All trees within Biophilic Precinct to be locally native or native evergreen. 

Exotic species should be used sparingly. Careful consideration should be given to certain species within an urban 

environment. Refer to section Considerations for Tree/Vegetation Selection for further details.


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Aims


 ▪ Achieve 100% shade cover on 

footpaths - species and spacing;

 ▪ Ensure reliability and suitability 

for urban environments;

 ▪ Increase level of natural 

biodiversity;

 ▪ Reinforce the identity and story 

line of Stirling;

 ▪ Respond to function 

requirements - passive solar, 

biophilic, water; and

 ▪ Reduce impact of the built form.

Street Tree Types

 ▪ Structure Trees - Dominant tree in 

the street planted uniformly along 

the streets entire length;

 ▪ Accent and Group Trees - 

Secondary tree planting which is 

used to reinforce special street 

characteristics, functions or 

identity; and

 ▪ Gateway Trees - Large focal point 

trees planted at the key entries 

into the City Centre.

STREET TREES

Angophora costata 

Eucalyptus gomphocephala

 

Agonis flexuosa 



Liquidambar styraciflua 

Jacaranda mimosifolia

Ulmus parvifolia

 

Platanus acerifolia 



Eucalyptus spathulata

5.1 VEGETATION



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Locally Native

Native 


Exotic

Allocasuarina fraseriana

Banksia attenuata

Banksia grandis

Banksia littoralis

Corymbia calophylla

Eucalyptus marginata

Eucalyptus gomphocephala

Eucalyptus rudis subsp. rudis

Eucalyptus todtiana

Melaleuca preissiana

Melaleuca rhaphiophylla

Agonis flexuosa

Angophora costata

Brachychiton populneus

Casuarina obesa

Corymbia citriodora

Corymbia maculata

Eucalyptus kondininensis

Eucalyptus patens

Eucalyptus spathulata

Melaleuca quinquenervia

Fraxinus excelsior

Fraxinus raywoodii

Gleditsia tricanthos

Jacaranda mimosifolia

Liquidambar formosana

Liquidambar styraciflua

Ulmus parvifolia

Indicative Park Trees Species List

Persea americana

 

Ficus carica



 

Morus sp


Olea europea

 

Mulberry


Note: All trees and planting within Biophilic Precinct to be locally native or native evergreen, with the exception of 

community and footpath gardens. Exotic species should be used sparingly. Careful consideration should be given to 

certain species within an urban environment. Refer to section Considerations for Tree/Vegetation Selection for further 

details.


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Aims


 ▪ Achieve good shade cover - 

species and spacing;

 ▪ Ensure reliability and suitability 

for urban environments;

 ▪ Enhance biodiversity and priotise 

use of locally native species;

 ▪ Encourage food production;

 ▪ Reinforce the identity and 

storyline of the Precincts;

 ▪ Create community landmarks;

 ▪ Respond to function 

requirements - passive solar, 

biophilic, water; 

 ▪ Improve local micro climate;

 ▪ Grow large canopy trees; and

 ▪ Enhance the beauty of the area.

 

PARK TREES



Trees in the Parks act as landmarks, enhance biodiversity and provide shade.

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Shrubs

Herbs


Rushes and sedges

Eutaxia virgata

Eremaea pauciflora

Euchilopsis linearis

Eutaxia virgata

Gastrolobium celsianum

Hakea varia

Hypocalymma angustifolium

Hypocalymma robustum 

Melaleuca lateritia

Melaleuca teretifolia

Melaleuca viminea

Pericalymma ellipticum

Regelia ciliata

Regelia inops

Scholtzia involucrata

Taxandria linearifolia

Dampiera linearis

Dianella revoluta

Patersonia occidentalis

Baumea juncea

Meeboldina roycei 

Meeboldina cana 

Meeboldina coangustata

Meeboldina diffusus

Chaetanthus aristatus

Hypolaena exsulca

Schoenoplectus validus

WSUD Bioretention Swales

Trees

Herbs


Vegetables

Citrus sp. (Lime, orange, lemon, 

mandarin)



Ficus carica

Morus sp. (Mulberry)

Persea americana

Olea europea

Carica papaya

Thymus vulgaris

Origanum vulgare

Ocimum basilicum

Salad plants



Brassica sp. (Tuscan Cabbage, Kale)

Allium Sativum

Spinacia oleracea 

Community and Footpath Gardens

Shrubs

Strappy Plants



Groundcovers

Adenanthos cuneatus

Scaevola sp.

Grevillea preissii (varieties)

Anigozanthos flavidus (hyrbrids) 

Dianella revoluta

Dianella caerulea

Lomandra longifolia

Juncus kraussii

Grevillea obtusifolia

Eremophila glabra

Kennedia prostrata

Trachelospermum jasminoides

Urban Planting

Note: All trees and planting within Biophilic Precinct to be locally native or native evergreen, with the exception of 

community and footpath gardens. Exotic species should be used sparingly. Careful consideration should be given to 

certain species within an urban environment. Refer to section Considerations for Tree/Vegetation Selection for further 

details.


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Aims


 ▪ Low water use

 ▪ Easy maintenance;

 ▪ Ensure reliability and suitability 

for urban environments;

 ▪ Increase natural biodiversity;

 ▪ Encourage food production;

 ▪ Reinforce the identity and 

storyline of the Precincts;

 ▪ Respond to function 

requirements - passive solar, 

biophilic, water; and

 ▪ Respond to CPTED principles.

 

Vegetation Types



 ▪ Bioretention / Bioinfiltration 

Swales - Vegetated swales that 

provide efficient treatment of 

stormwater. They are designed to 

convey stormwater and provide 

water quality improvement prior 

to entering the Urban Stream.

 ▪ Community and Footpath 

Gardens - Verges or nature strips 

can be used for food production 

and communal gardening. 

Footpath gardens are managed 

by individuals or the local 

community.

 ▪ Urban Planting -  Low 

maintenance and low water use 

garden beds with high level of 

uniformity.

 ▪ Native Seasonal Planting - Locally 

native seasonal planting should 

be considered as part of the 

place activation of the Urban 

Place Streets, Destinations and 

Gateways. It includes temporary 

installations of flowering plants 

in planters and road medians to 

brighten the city scape.

ADDITIONAL VEGETATION

Seasonal planting to activate the streets

Biofiltration swale in the streetscape

Community Verge Garden 


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CONSIDERATIONS FOR TREE/ 

VEGETATION SELECTION

A primary aim for the Stirling City 

Centre is to enhance biodiversity and 

create ecological corridors. Whilst a 

mix of native and exotic plants are 

nominated within the strategy, exotic 

species should be used sparingly with 

locally endemic and native species 

given priority. 

General considerations 

in selection include:

 ▪ Character precinct contribution;

 ▪ Biodiversity contribution;

 ▪ Irrigation needs;

 ▪ Soil preparation;

 ▪ Spatial restrictions (above and 

below ground); 

 ▪ Requirements for maintaining 

tree health; and

 ▪ Contribution to minimising 

maintenance.

Consideration should be given to 

the use of certain species which 

have known impacts that can 

be detrimental within  an urban 

environment (i.e. damage to paving, 

infrastructure, dropping of limbs, slip 

hazards, allergies) if not correctly 

installed, maintained or managed.

Species of note are as follows:

Street Trees

 ▪ Eucalyptus and Corymbia species 

require regular tree health checks 

as some species are prone to 

shed limbs, hence are a potential 

risk to public and infrastructure if 

not maintained well;



 ▪ Jacaranda mimosifolia, once 

mature produce large amount 

of flowers, which when falling 

can cause slip hazards, regular 

cleaning of walkways are required 

in late October to November;



 ▪ Platanus acerfolia, keep number 

of trees low as pollen can 

cause both physical and allergic 

reactions; and



 ▪ Agonis flexuosa is very slow 

growing and advanced trees 

need to selected for planting for 

impact.


Accent Trees

 ▪ Banksias, establishment can be 

difficult, plant specific soil types 

must be provided to promote 

plant establishment and growth. 



Banksias often fall over after 

two years if soils conditions are 

not suitable. Plant banksias in 

clumps of 3 to 5m apart and 

selecting feature trees after 2 to 

3 years; and



 ▪ Robinia  pseudoacacia, these 

trees form runners, root barriers 

are imperative if selected.

Gateway Trees



 ▪ Ficus species have invasive 

root structures (which can lift 

concrete and potentially damage 

pipework etc.), root barriers 

should be considered to protect 

infrastructure; and

 ▪ Ongoing checks for tree health 

and to prune out dead wood will 

be required.

Fruiting Trees

 ▪ Consider fruiting trees and 

their impact (e.g. fruits staining 

footpaths, larger fruit may 

cause a trip hazard,  fallen fruit 

may attract vermin) therefore 

planting in wide garden beds 

and in areas where management 

responsibilities are sustainable is 

recommended;

 ▪ Olea europea will seed into 

adjacent garden areas and 

handweeding or spot spraying 

is required once plants start to 

produce fruit; and

 ▪ Consider planting sterile fruit 

trees.

Urban and seasonal plantings



 ▪ Height restrictions (must not 

exceed 500mm)



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Main Pavement Type 1 

Rectangular format (600x300) 

exposed aggregate concrete unit 

paver with shot blast finish

Kerb Type 1

In situ concrete charcoal colour 

kerb with 300 wide x 150 deep 

profile (to match granite kerb) 

Rectangular format (200x300) 

exposed aggregate concrete unit 

paver with shot blast finish

Flush Kerb

Urbanstone Golden Gunmetal Precast Concrete Unit Paver

Urbanstone Golden Gunmetal Precast Concrete Unit Paver used in 

a streetscape

Example of Kerb Type 1 and Flush kerb

Figure 47: Indicative arrangement of materials

Finish

Honed


Milled

Shortblast



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5.2 SURFACE TREATMENTS

Aims

 ▪ Reinforce the identity and story 



line of the Precincts;

 ▪ Easy to maintain and install;

 ▪ Readily available - preferably 

locally manufactured;

 ▪ Represents value for money;

 ▪ High quality;

 ▪ Meets Australian Standards (slip 

resistance);

 ▪ Consistency across the City 

Centre;


 ▪ Assist with sustainability - reduce 

urban heat - light coloured, 

permeability; and

 ▪ Recycled component.

Management requirements

 ▪ Safety requirements (slip rating);

 ▪ Commercial grade;

 ▪ Ground preparation (trafficable); 

and

 ▪ Not permitting non-standard 



footpath surfacing and furniture 

outcomes on the public footway, 

such as the continuation of 

materials used on the adjacent 

private property.

Grates and covers

In the City Precinct service access 

covers should be located beneath the 

paving material and marked by an 

appropriate logo set into the paving

Pavements

Main Pavement Type 1

Location: All streets except Urban 

Place Streets and Destinations 

Rectangular format (600x300) 

exposed aggregate concrete unit 

paver with shot blast finish. Charcoal 

colour with 5mm diameter bluestone 

and rainbow quartz aggregate mix.



Suggested Product: Urbanstone 

‘Golden Gunmetal’

Main Pavement Type 2

Location: Urban Place Streets and 

Destinations

Rectangular (600x300) format 

exposed aggregate concrete unit 

paver with milled finish. Charcoal 

colour with 5mm diameter bluestone 

and rainbow quartz aggregate mix.



Suggested Product: Urbanstone 

‘Golden Gunmetal’

Main Pavement Type 3

Location: Community Streets

In situ natural concrete with broom 

finish


Note: For trafficable areas around 

destinations, insitu concrete 

surfacing  to match paving should be 

considered.



Accent Paving

Location: Urban Place Streets and 

Destinations

Unit pavers reflective the street type 

and precinct. Suitable materials 

include:


 ▪ Granite Cobbles;

 ▪ Solid Bricks; and

 ▪ In situ coloured concrete 

patterned and milled finish.

Tactile Indicators

Provide tactile ground surface 

indicators (TGSIs) in accordance with 

Australian Standards (refer AS/NZS 

1428.4:2002).

Preference is for tactile indicators to 

be laid in modular units.

Permeable Pavements

Provide in accordance with water 

management plan requirements. 

Materials should be reflective of the 

street type and precinct. 

Kerbs


Kerb Type 1

Location: Urban Place Streets

In situ concrete charcoal colour kerb 

with 300 wide x 150 deep profile (to 

match granite kerb) 

Kerb Type 2

In situ natural grey concrete with semi 

mountable profile

Flush kerb

In situ concrete 300mm wide, colour 

to match other kerbs.

Car Bays


Car bay Pavement Type 1

Location: Urban Place Streets and 

City Precinct

Rectangular format (300x200) 

exposed aggregate concrete unit 

paver with shot blast finish. Charcoal 

colour with 5mm diameter bluestone 

and rainbow quartz aggregate mix.



Car bay Pavement Type 2

Location: All streets except Urban 

Place Streets

Lateritic red asphalt



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Urban Edge Batten Seat URB: SAT B300W

Urban Edge Batten Seat URB: SAT B332

Custom Tree grate with integrated WSUD By Heine Jones

Cora Stainless Steel Bike Rail

Street Furniture Australia Arqua Drinking Station


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5.3 STREET FURNITURE 

RANGE

A uniform suite of street furniture 



is recommend for the Stirling City 

Centre. Elements include:

Seating, rubbish bin enclosure, tree 

grate, drinking fountain, bicycle rack, 

and pole lighting . 

Aims


 ▪ Well designed, robust and 

functional;

 ▪ Adds to the City’s identity;

 ▪ Contemporary design;

 ▪ Provides improved public amenity 

and comfort;

 ▪ Located to eliminate clutter and 

not encroach into pedestrian 

paths of travel

 ▪ Allows for universal access;

 ▪ Responds to different 

demographics (children and 

elderly); 

 ▪ Constructed from durable 

materials and has longevity;

 ▪ Easy to maintain, clean, repair or 

replace; and

 ▪ Locally manufactured; and

 ▪ Cost effective and value for 

money.


Seating

There are 3 suitable seat types:

 ▪ Seat with arms and back;

 ▪ Seat with back; and

 ▪ Bench (no arms or back).

The seat should:

 ▪ Be robust, comfortable and have 

a generous length;

 ▪ Have a contoured timber surface

 ▪ Be sub surface fixing with 

allowance to cater for uneven 

surfaces;

 ▪ Have a powder coated cast 

aluminium frame or stainless 

steel frame; and

 ▪ Have hardwood timber slates 

(sourced from plantation or 

sustainably harvested) or 

recycled HDPE plastic slats.

Suggested Product: Cox Urban 

Furniture, Urban Edge Range, 3 

person  Batten Seat.

Rubbish Bin Enclosure

The design of the rubbish bin 

enclosure should:

 ▪ Be simple and discreet;

 ▪ Have dual bins for general waste 

and recycle waste;

 ▪ Be located at regular intervals 

along main pedestrian routes 

and at major hubs (parks and 

square);

 ▪ Have a top to restrict access by 

birds; and

 ▪ Fit 120L sulo bin.



Suggested Product: Cox Urban 

Furniture, Urban Edge Range, 

Enclosure EWL 121.

Rubbish bins should be emptied on a 

regular basis to maintain a well cared 

for public realm.

Bike Racks

Bike racks should be located 

throughout the public realm in 

accordance with Australian Standard 

AS 2890.3 – 1993. The design 

should:


 ▪ Constructed of 316 grade 

stainless steel; and

 ▪ Be sub surface mounted.

Suggested Product: Cora Bike Parking 

Rail CBR2 or Urban Furniture, Urban 

Edge Range, BCR 201.


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Smart Pole with banners and lighting

Catenary lights in Urban Place Streets

Catenary lights as public art

Lighting as public art

Catenary lights


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Tree Grate

Tree grates will be integrated with 

WSUD rain garden. 

Location: Urban Place Streets and 

Squares


 The design of the tree grate should:

 ▪ Be designed to allow the 

penetration of air and water to 

the soil;

 ▪ Minimise trip and slip hazards 

and rubbish trapping properties;

 ▪ Be constructed from stainless 

steel or aluminium; and

 ▪ Incorporate public art  and 

interpretation (eg. Maribyrnong 

City Council, Leeds Street, 

Footscray by Heine Jones).

Drink Water Fountains

Drink fountains and water filling poles 

should:

 ▪ Be located along main pedestrian 



routes and at major hubs; and

 ▪ Be accessible for people in 

wheelchairs.

Suggested Product: Street Furniture 

Australia Arqua fountain DF4 and 

pole DF 7.

Lighting


LED options should be included. 

Products should be investigated as 

new technologies/products become 

available.

Decorative Street Lighting

Location:  Urban Place Streets

Multifunction pole that combines 

multiple street pole functions onto 

one designed structural urban 

element. 

Accessories include:

 ▪ Banners;

 ▪ CCTV;

 ▪ Street signs;

 ▪ Traffic lights; and

 ▪ Catenary lights.



Suggested Product: Hub multifunction 

smart pole. Aluminium finish.

Pedestrian Lighting

Pedestrian scale pole (4 - 6m ) with 

reflector shade top which directs  light 

downwards and prevents  light from 

being emitted upwards and hidden 

light source.



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5.4 PUBLIC ART

A public art programme should be 

aligned with the development of the 

Stirling City Centre public realm to 

contribute to creating a vibrant and 

creative city. 

Aims


 ▪ Embed public art into the fabric 

of the city including the public 

realm and architecture;

 ▪ Use public art to reflect Stirling’s 

history, diverse communities, 

environment, creativity and 

innovation particularly towards 

creating a biophilic city;

 ▪ Recognise and celebrate 

aboriginal stories and heritage in 

public spaces,

 ▪ Provide opportunities for all 

people to participate;

 ▪ Create unique experiences that 

are universally accessible to all 

people;


 ▪ Use public art to inspire creativity, 

make places vibrant and the 

pedestrian experience more 

enjoyable;

 ▪ Support the local art culture by 

commissioning local artists and 

community art projects 

 ▪ Activate public spaces with 

temporary art;

 ▪ Promote high quality public art in 

major new developments; and

 ▪ Explore different forms of art 

including pavement design in 

squares and plazas, lighting 

canopies, interactive water 

features, temporary art as well as 

more traditional forms such as 

sculpture and murals.

This strategy should be read in 

conjunction with the City of Stirling 



Public Art Strategy.

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5.5 PLAYGROUNDS AND 

YOUTH ACTIVITY AREAS

Playgrounds and Youth Areas are 

highly valued facilities that are 

accessible to the whole community. 

A range of recreational facilities 

including skate parks, playgrounds, 

and hard courts will be provided 

within the open space throughout 

Stirling City Centre relative to the 

typologies described in Section 4.

Aims


 ▪ Provide local residents and 

visitors with safe, age appropriate 

recreational space that meet the 

relevant Australian Standards;

 ▪ Ensure local neighbourhoods 

have access to playground and 

fitness equipment within easy 

walking distance to their home;

 ▪ Design playgrounds that meet 

future needs of the community; 

and

 ▪ Provide recreational facilities that 



will improve physical fitness of 

children and youth.

A detailed City of Stirling Skate and 

BMX Facility Strategy (Convic 2013) 

has recently been completed and 

should be read in conjunction with 

the UDLS.

5.6 WATER FEATURES

Water is a central theme of the 

Stirling City Centre identity, with 

the Urban Stream forming a main 

focus.  Opportunities should be 

explored to express and interpret 

water throughout the public realm, 

in particular within the Biophilic 

Precinct.

Aims


 ▪ Locate water features in key 

destinations in the City Centre; 

 ▪ Use harvested rainwater and 

stormwater for water features;

 ▪ Ensure water is treated to 

appropriate Department of health 

standards dependent on the 

nature of the water feature and 

the level of human contact;

 ▪ Provide a variety of water features 

including interactive water, 

ephemeral water and reflective 

ponds designed to relate to the 

function of the destinations and 

its precinct; and

 ▪ Use water features to ameliorate 

the microclimate.

5.7 INTERPRETATION

Interpretive signage should be used 

to communicate significant cultural 

and environmental stories of Stirling 

City Centre. Interpretation should 

be focused along the Urban Stream 

corridor and extend into the Biophilic 

streets.

Aims


 ▪ Interpretation should be 

integrated sensitively into the 

public realm and can include 

signage, pavement design and 

sculptural elements

.

Playgrounds should be safe, age appropriate and support the needs of the whole family.



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Interpretation of the Urban Stream and the Biophilic Precinct should be integrated into children’s play experience to make learning fun

Water Feature can use rain water harvested from adjoining buildings. Rouse Hill Town Centre


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6.0

IMPLEMENTATION



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High levels of amenity, accessibility 

and activation are critical to ensuring 

the Stirling City Centre becomes a 

highly desirable location for residents, 

businesses and their employees. A 

key contribution to achieving this will 

be provided by the public realm 

The UDLS describes a range of 

principles and strategies to achieve 

these outcomes and ensures public 

open space provision:

 ▪ Offers quality experiences, is 

visually appealing, is accessible, 

provides diversity of choice, is 

functional and appropriately 

located, has an appropriate 

amenity level; and 

 ▪ Is sufficient to meet the end 

user demands and expectations 

relating to quality of POS and 

provision of various sporting, 

recreational and leisure 

amenities.

This section discusses the role of the 

UDLS in future planning processes, 

and key issues to be addressed to 

enable the principles and strategies 

to be achieved. 

Potential short term implementation 

options are also included to ensure 

that project momentum and 

community confidence is built and 

maintained whilst the City Centre 

develops over the anticipated 40 to 

60 year time frame.



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6.1 ROLE OF THE UDLS 

WITHIN FUTURE PLANNING 

PROCESSES

Provisions for making of an 

Improvement Scheme are provided 

for in the amendment to Improvement 

Plan 36 which applies to the Stirling 

City Centre. The purpose of the 

Improvement Scheme as outlined in 

the Planning Integration Workshop 1 



Agenda (Stirling Alliance 2013) is to

“...enable urban renewal by applying 

various planning principles that, 

amongst other things, guide future 

land use development, funding 

arrangements and infrastructure 

provision in an orderly manner.”

The intention of the Stirling Alliance is 

to revise the current Draft Structure 

Plan (Stirling Alliance 2011) to 

reflect the proposed changes to key 

structural elements that have arisen 

since its advertising in 2011. 

The UDLS will be a key report 

referenced in the revised document 

and will inform both the development 

of the Improvement Scheme and 

Local Development Plans (LDP’s) 

prepared for individual precincts. The 

relationship between documents is as 

follows:


 ▪ The Structure Plan will provide 

guidance on provisions pertaining 

to road reserves and Public Open 

Space (POS).  The respective 

LDP’s prepared for the precincts 

will provide a much greater level 

of detail. In each case, these 

provisions will be guided by the 

UDLS;

 ▪ The LDP’s will be closely 



informed by the UDLS in respect 

to provisions applying to road 

reserve (including paving, road 

and footpath widths, street trees, 

furniture, etc) and POS (including 

use of parks and selection of 

species).;

 ▪ The UDLS will be a reference 

document in the Improvement 

Scheme;


 ▪ The Improvement Scheme will 

pursue developer contributions 

and the details will be determined 

in the LDPs. The UDLS will help 

inform this process; and

 ▪ The Improvement Scheme Map is 

expected to reflect the proposed 

allocation of parks and urban 

spaces proposed by the UDLS.


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6.2 GOVERNANCE AND THE 

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 

UDLS


The Stirling Alliance has been charged 

with planning the development of 

the Stirling City Centre as a ‘Strategic 

Metropolitan Centre’ however the 

State Government (nominally the 

WAPC at present) will take a lead 

role in implementation together with 

the City of Stirling (as the ultimate 

custodian of the City Centre), relevant 

state agencies, utility providers and 

developers. 

Strategies within the UDLS rely on 

the re-purposing of land and the 

co-ordination and co-operation of 

these groups to capitalise on the 

“win-win”opportunities that the UDLS 

presents.

Key issues to overcome include:

LAND ASSEMBLY

 ▪ Conversion of government land 

to public open space reserves 

(Linear Park, Celebration Place, 

Station North District Park); 

 ▪ Acquisition of private land for 

public open space (Northern & 

Osborne Precincts) and Public 

Access Ways (Station, Southern 

Woodlands Precinct); and

 ▪ Consolidation of existing under-

utilised parks will require existing 

reserves to be re-purposed (i.e. 

Odin, Croxton, Laga, Elton, Bajada 

Reserve).

ASSET AND PLACE MANAGEMENT

 ▪ The provision and management 

of public  and communal spaces 

by private sector (Town Square, 

Market Forecourt, Transit 

Square);

 ▪ Co-location of community 

facilities within private 

developments  with ownership 

to be within GFA (i.e. Library/

community centre co-located with 

Town Square within Westfield);

 ▪ Co-sharing of public open space 

between the City of Stirling and 

other government departments 

(i.e. sporting ovals, carparking 

and courts);

 ▪ Co-sharing of resources between 

private and public properties (i.e. 

rainwater harvesting from private 

buildings supplying POS water 

features and water play);

 ▪ Integration of recreational and 

leisure activities within the urban 

stream floodplain and within road 

reserves (Linear Park);

 ▪ Non-standard surface treatments 

(i.e. LRT reserve); 

 ▪ Augmentation of existing 

streetscapes within established 

neighbourhoods (All Precincts); 

and

 ▪ Ongoing coordination of place 



activation strategies & programs.

Given the above issues, further 

studies will be required to progress 

individual opportunities within the 

UDLS as they have been formulated 

on the basis of varying degrees of 

available information, technical 

resolution and stakeholder input. 

The scope of these studies (inc. 

asset/risk management & delivery) 

can be developed following further 

input from the stakeholder groups and 

clarification as to which opportunities 

are likely to be supported.

Central to the success of the UDLS is 

the ongoing synergies/communication 

between the City of Stirling, 

stakeholders, and the lead delivery 

agency to ensure future plans, 

programs and policies developed are 

responsive to and supportive of the 

UDLS as the project evolves.

FUNDING 

Funding for the capital works 

(including land acquisition and 

seeding capital) required to 

implement the strategies identified 

will be sourced from a combination of:

 ▪ Council revenue.

 ▪ External funding and grants 

from other State and Federal 

Government agencies.

 ▪ Developer contributions pursued 

within the Stirling City Centre 

Improvement Scheme.

 ▪ Public/Private funding 

partnerships .

Obligations of each party will be 

determined within future detailed 

implementation planning.



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“South Station Precinct” Project 1

South Station Precinct Project 1.

Tassel’s Place 

Preferred Option

B ild th


ill

th f th f

ith

Build the village square south of the freeway ramp with



permanent infrastructure (including lift + or – escalators)

Figure 48: Station Precinct South

Figure 49: Stream Park North


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6.3 STAGING

The realisation of the Stirling City 

Centre is anticipated to occur over 

a 40-60 year time frame.  The key 

catalysts for the ultimate build-out 

of the City Centre are driven by the 

provision of new access roads and the 

remediation of the former Hertha tip 

site. These are currently medium and 

long term propositions respectively.

Stage 1 of the project will include 

a development of current vacant 

government land. Initial conceptual 

planning of the public realm within 

stage 1 has been completed and 

incorporates the principles and 

strategies outlined within this 

document. These conceptual 

plans were tabled at the Master 

Strategy Workshop. These plans 

and associated outputs from the 

Workshop are provided in Appendices 

5, 6 and 7.

CATALYST PROJECTS

Short term catalyst projects which 

achieve short-term “wins” are 

important to building and maintaining 

community and stakeholder 

confidence and project momentum. 

These short term wins should be 

reflective of the project vision and 

where possible be used to implement 

some of the proposed public realm 

experiences, test concepts and to 

progress the building  of the future 

community and forecasting future 

change.


The Master Strategy Workshop 

provided initial direction on 

what catalyst projects could be 

implemented in the short term (0-5 

years), these included the following 

(Refer Figures 48 and 49) :

 ▪ Station Precinct South 

 ▪ Stream Park-North (Sarich Court 

to Howe Street) 

 ▪ Herdsman-Stirling Bike Link  

Further detail of these projects can be 

found within Appendix 7.

Additional potential short term 

projects are provided on the following 

page.


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6.4 TEMPORARY USES ON VACANT LAND  

Create a series of changing events or community facilities on vacant 

government owned land. 

URBAN FARM

  

Establish short term community garden on government land. Design the 



community garden to be mobile so it can be moved to another location in the 

future.


COMMUNITY  INFORMATION CENTRE

  

Establish a mobile Stirling City Centre redevelopment project office in a high 



profile location within the city heart which can act as both a sales office, as well 

as providing community information on the project and as a hub for community 

events.

TEMPORARY NURSERY 



  

This nursery could be used to propagate locally endemic plant and tree species 

identified in the UDLS for use within the Biophilic precinct (biophilic streets, 

urban stream, green bridges etc). This could potentially be a community 

managed operation.

COMMUNITY FACILITIES

  

These could include playgrounds, BMX park, or pop-up sea container city (e.g. 



Christchurch, NZ). Activation projects of this type (such as “No Vacancy”  in New 

York) have been successfully implemented (novacancyproject.wordpress.com).



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DEMONSTRATION BIOPHILIC STREETS  

Upgrade select streets to reflect the biophilic street concept and implement 

monitoring programme to test the street typology’s success in improving micro-

climate and ecological outcomes. Possible locations include Sarich Crt and 

Twyford Place.

ESTABLISHING ELLEN STIRLING BOULEVARD AS AN URBAN PLACE STREET

Plant Ellen Stirling Boulevard with colourful annuals, shade trees and edible 

plants to make it a special street that people would like to walk along. 

Banners and flags, catenary lighting to bring a human scale to the streets.

ESTABLISH A BIKE SHARE SYSTEM 

Bike hubs, easy bike share and complete a fully connected temp cycle path 

network through the Stirling City Centre.

PARTNER WITH IKEA / WESTFIELD

Establish a courtesy bus from Westfield to Ikea and the train station. Free home 

delivery of medium and large goods if you catch the train to Ikea / Westfield

Ikea partnership with Department of Housing, government and private 

developers to make gains in affordability of apartments.

6.5 INCREMENTAL IMPLEMENTATION OF  THE UDLS

Demonstration projects and catalyst schemes which support the vision 

and enable testing ground for approaches and partnerships 


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6.6 RECOMMENDED NEXT 

STEPS

 ▪ Liaison with stakeholders to 



generate interest, provide any 

clarification and agree on “win-

win” outcomes with respect to 

individual and group initiatives;

 ▪ Selection of the lead delivery 

agency and formation of 

a steering committee and 

agreement on who will champion 

the overall strategy and individual 

initiatives or groups of initiatives;

 ▪ Scope the required studies to 

enable the implementation of a 

meaningful short term catalyst 

project within the next 5 years;

 ▪ Scope future studies and 

investigations required to 

progress the feasibility of medium 

and long term initiatives and 

develop a program of projects; 

and


 ▪ Develop appropriate asset 

management models, risk 

management models and delivery 


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REFERENCES

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and John Gaskell Planning 

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South East Regions, Queensland. 

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Preliminary Investigation Of Aboriginal 

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Ethnographic Heritage Consultations 

(Final Report); Metropolitan Area 

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Stirling City Centre Alliance, Perth, 

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(2013). Classification Framework for 



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Water Management Strategy

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IMAGE REFERENCES

Page 16


: Landgate (2013). ‘1953’, ‘1974’ 

and ‘2011’ [historic aerials]. Received 

from Hames Sharley 5 April 2013. 

Original images retrieved (date unknown), 





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