Vegetation and Flora Survey Report


Distribution of Priority Flora within the Coburn Survey area



Yüklə 2,41 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/11
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü2,41 Mb.
növüReport
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

Distribution of Priority Flora within the Coburn Survey area 

 

(GPS Datum AMG84 50J





 

 

Taxon EASTING

NORTHING

Acacia subrigida (P2) 214588

7039989


 

212443


7052349

 

213205


7039722

 

212451


7052467

 

 

Eremophila occidens (P2) ms 

213412

7066137


 213624

7049925


 214382

7042245


 214588

7039989


 226011

7050401


 250292

7050852


 254761

7050945


 

 

Scholtzia sp. Folly Hill (P2) 215401

7035506

 

 



Acacia drepanophylla (P3) 227868

7050251


 

255478


7050812

 

214089


7066191

 

214057


7066250

 

214129


7066227

 

253319


7050776

 

239865


7050543

 

250437


7050718

 

 

Grevillea rogersoniana (P3) 212708

7047315

 213205


7039722

 213285


7040822

 214588


7039989

 214986


7045003

 

 



Grevillea stenostachya (P3) 249722

7034631


 249518

7034636


 254761

7050945


 

 

Macarthuria intricata (P3) 215400

7034350

 

213193


7039388

 

 

Physopsis chrysophylla (P3) 212402

7040896

 212681


7039534

 213205


7039722

 213767


7049921

 214371


7043502

 214588


7039989

 215075


7046796

 

 

Jacksonia dendrospinosa (P4) 229965

7034796

 


Flora and Vegetation 

 

12. 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

 

Table 4:  

Rare and Priority Flora recorded in other surveys of the Irwin and 

Carnarvon Botanical Districts that were not found in the present survey 

 

^    -   Data extracted from Trudgen and Keighery (1995) includes community groups 1,5 

and 6 only 

 

 Trudgen 



and 

Keighery 1995 

Gibson          et 



al.       

2000 


Abutilon sp. Hamelin (A.M. Ashby 2196) (P2) (pn) 

 



Acacia isoneura subsp. nimia (P3) 

 



Acacia leptospermoides subsp. obovata (P2) 

 



Acacia plautella (P3) 

 



Acanthocarpus parviflorus (P3) 

 



Anthocercis intricata (P3) 

 



Anthrotroche myoporoides (P2) 

 



Arnocrinum drummondii (P3) 

 



Chamelaucium conostigmum (P3) (ms) 

 



Chamelaucium oenanthum (P1) (ms) 

 



Chthonocephalus muellerianus (P2) 

 



Chthonocephalus spathulatus (P1) 

 



Chthonocepahalus tomentellus (P2) 



Dicrastylis linearifolia (P3) 

 



Dicrastylis micrantha (P3) 

 



Eremophila physocalyx (P3) (ms) 



Eucalyptus beardiana (R) 

 



Goodenia sericostachya (P3) 

 



Grevillea annulifera (P3) 

 



Grevillea stenomera (P2) 

 



Jacksonia velutina (P4) 

 



Lasiopetalum oppositifolium (P3) 

 



Lepidium biplicatum (P2) 

 



Lepidobolus densus (P3) (ms) 

 



Malleostemon sp. Cooloomia (S.F. Hopper 133)(P2)(pn) 

 



Malleostemon sp. Nerren Nerren (A. Payne 360)(P1)(pn) 

 



Melaleuca huegelii subsp. pristicensis (P2) 

 



Millotia depauperata (P1) 

 



Ptilotus stirlingii var. pumius (P1) 

 



Rhodanthe oppositifolia subsp. ornata (P2) 

 



Rhodanthe sp. Overlander (P.S. Short 2096) (P1) (pn) 

 



Scaevola chrysopogon (P2) 

 



Sclerolaena stylosa (P1).  

 



Sondottia glabrata (P2)  

 



Tetragonia coronata (P1) 

 



Thryptomene sp. Carrarang (M.E. Trudgen 7420)(P1)(pn) 

 



Triodia bromoides (P4) 

 



Verticordia cooloomia (P3) 

 



Verticordia dichroma var. dichroma (P3)  

 



Verticordia dichroma var. syntoma (P3) 

 



Vittadinia cervicularis var. oldfieldii (P1). 

 



Flora and Vegetation 

 

13. 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

5.3 Vegetation 

 

Eighteen plant communities were defined and mapped during the surveys in 2003 and 2004. These 

community types consist of seven Eucalyptus  Woodlands, ten Shrublands and one mosaic community. 

The complete species list of each plant community is listed in Appendix B. A description of each plant 

community is given below.    

 

Eucalyptus Woodlands 

 

Community E1: 

 

Low Open Woodland of Eucalyptus selachiana and Eucalyptus roycei with occasional emergent Banksia 



ashbyi over Calothamnus formosus subsp. formosus and Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa over Lamarchea 

hakeifolia var. brevifolia, Malleostemon pedunculatus and Melaleuca eulobata over Triodia 

danthonioides. 

 

Community E2

 

Low Open Woodland of Eucalyptus selachiana and Eucalyptus fruticosa with occasional emergent 



Eucalyptus mannensis subsp. vespertina and Eucalyptus roycei over Acacia  ramulosa var. ramulosa, 

Acacia ligulata and Eremophila maitlandii over mixed annual species.

 

 



Community E3

 

Low Open Woodland of Eucalyptus fruticosa and Eucalyptus obtusiflora subsp. obtusiflora over Acacia 



xiphophylla, Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa and Acacia ligulata over mixed Chenopod species. 

 

Community E4

 

Low Open Woodland of Eucalyptus selachiana and Eucalyptus ?eudesmioides over Acacia ramulosa var. 



ramulosa, Acacia roycei, Acacia ligulata and Grevillea gordoniana over Baeckea sp. Nanga (pn) over 

Triodia danthonioides

 

Community E5

 

Low Open Woodland of Eucalyptus obtusiflora subsp. obtusiflora over Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa 



and Acacia galeata over Ptilotus obovatus var. obovatus and Triodia plurinervata. 

 

Community E6

 

Low Open Woodland of Eucalyptus mannensis subsp. vespertina over Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa 



over Rhagodia latifolia subsp. latifolia over mixed annual species. 

 

Community E7: 



 

Low Open Woodland of Eucalyptus selachiana over Calothamnus formosus subsp. formosus and Acacia 



ligulata over Lamarchea hakeifolia var. brevifolia over Triodia danthonioides

 

Shrublands 

 

Community S1

 

Tall Shrubland of Calothamnus formosus subsp. formosus and Hakea stenophylla subsp. notialis with 



occasional emergent Eucalyptus selachiana,  Eucalyptus roycei and Eucalyptus  mannensis subsp. 

vespertina with Banksia ashbyi over Acacia ligulata and Lamarchea  hakeifolia var. brevifolia over 

Triodia danthonioides.

 

 



Flora and Vegetation 

 

14. 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

Community S2

 

Tall Open Shrubland of Calothamnus formosus subsp. formosus,  Hakea stenophylla subsp. notialis and 



Acacia ligulata with occasional emergent Eucalyptus selachiana, Eucalyptus roycei and Eucalyptus 

mannensis subsp. vespertina with Banksia ashbyi over Lamarchea hakeifolia var. brevifolia and Baeckea 

sp. Nanga (pn) over Triodia danthonioides

 

Community S3

 

Low Open Shrubland of Acacia ligulata and Hakea stenophylla subsp. notialis with occasional emergent 



Eucalyptus selachiana and Eucalyptus roycei over Baeckea sp. Nanga (pn) and Stenanthemum 

complicatum over Triodia danthonioides

 

Community S4

 

Tall Open Shrubland of Grevillea gordoniana and Acacia ligulata with occasional emergent Eucalyptus 



selachiana over Melaleuca eulobata, Baeckea sp. Nanga (pn) and Adenanthos acanthophyllus over 

Triodia danthonioides

 

Community S5

 

Low Open Shrubland of Acacia subrigida (P2) with occasional emergent Eucalyptus ?eudesmioides and 



Eucalyptus roycei with Banksia ashbyi over Malleostemon pedunculatus over Triodia danthonioides

 

Community S6

 

Low Open Shrubland of Acacia longispinea with occasional emergent Eucalyptus mannensis subsp. 



vespertina over Melaleuca leiopyxis and Melaleuca eulobata over Malleostemon pedunculatus over 

Triodia danthonioides

 

Community S7: 

 

Tall Open Shrubland of Acacia sclerosperma subsp. sclerosperma and Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa 



over Eremophila maitlandii over Ptilotus obovatus var. obovatus

 

Community S8

 

Tall Open Shrubland of Acacia xiphophylla, Acacia drepanophylla (P3) and Acacia ramulosa var. 



ramulosa over Chenopodium gaudichaudianum and Scaevola spinescens. 

 

Community S9

 

Tall Open Shrubland of Acacia xiphophylla and Acacia drepanophylla (P3) over Acacia grasbyi, Acacia 



tetragonophylla and Senna glutinosa subsp. chatelainiana over Ptilotus obovatus var. obovatus. 

 

Community S10

 

Tall Open Shrubland of Physopsis chrysophylla (P3) and Acacia rostellifera over Calothamnus formosus 



subsp. formosus and Mirbelia sp. Denham (pn) over Triodia danthonioides. 

 

The pattern of plant communities differs significantly in the northern third of survey area compared to the 

southern end as the shrublands and patches of Eucalypts in the north form a mosaic of locally changing 

communities (often over 50 metres, which cannot be mapped at the scale as attached). This mosaic of 

local communities has been combined into the M1 community.   

 


Flora and Vegetation 

 

15. 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

 

Mosaic Community 

 

Community M1 

 

Mosaic of patches of a Tall Open Shrubland of Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa, Acacia ligulata and 



Acacia roycei with occasional emergent Eucalyptus selachiana, Eucalyptus roycei, Eucalyptus mannensis 

subsp.  vespertina and Eucalyptus obtusiflora subsp. obtusiflora  over  Eremophila maitlandii and 



Lamarchea hakeifolia subsp. brevifolia over mixed annual species, with patches of a Tall Open Shrubland 

of  Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa  and Acacia roycei over Melaleuca leiopyxis and Malleostemon 



pedunculatus over mixed annuals in sands. 

5.4 Vegetation 

Condition 

The intact vegetation structure and low density of introduced species suggests the vegetation within the 

Amy Zone to be in “Excellent” condition, when applied to the condition scaling used in Bush Forever 

publications (Department of Environmental Protection, 2000), as adapted from Keighery (1994). Despite 

the presence of Brassica tounefortii in some disturbed areas, the scale considers vegetation to be in 

“Excellent” condition when the total cover of introduced species is less than 20%. Soil structure and 

understorey density are degraded due to grazing in Communities S7, S8 and S9 on the potential access 

road corridors, which would result in a poorer condition scale of “Very Good” (Mattiske Consulting Pty 

Ltd, 2003).

 

5.5 



Significance of Plant Communities 

None of the plant communities within the survey area are considered Threatened Ecological Communities 

pursuant to Schedule 2 of the Environmental Protection Biodiversity Conservation Act (1999) or 

according to English and Blyth (1997).

 

 

Fourteen of the eighteen plant communities (E1, E2, E3, E4, E6, E7, S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6, S10 and M1) 



described and mapped may be considered regionally significant, as they are endemic to the area south of 

Shark Bay (Beard, 1990). Community S5 is particularly significant, as it is restricted to deep valleys, 

which are an unusual landform both locally and within the region.  

 

Several plant communities within the survey area are considered locally significant where Priority species 



have been recorded, namely Communities E3, E6, S1, S2, S3, S5, S7, S8, S9 and S10. Communities S5, 

S8, S9 and S10 are locally significant, as Priority species constitute a dominant element within the 

communities. Based on current information the distribution of S10 appears to be restricted within the 

survey area. The Communities E4 and S4 are also locally significant as they support populations of 



Grevillea acacioides which occurs as a range extension from previously recorded locations (based on the 

CALM FloraBase, 2005). The plant Communities S7, S8 and S9 are also locally significant as they are 

restricted to calcareous soils in the eastern part of the survey area, but they are unlikely to be markedly 

influenced by the proposed development.  

 

Three extensions of the original survey area were mapped during April and November 2004. The plant 



Communities S1, S2 and S3 were recorded in these areas, which were identical in structure and species 

composition from those communities in the central part of the Coburn survey area. In the additional 

survey of the proposed southern haul road conducted in November 2004, the plant Communities S1, S2, 

S7, S9, E2, E3, E4, E6 and E7 were recorded. These were floristically equivalent to the communities 

recorded in previous surveys of the initial haul road to the north and the main survey area. Eastern 

sections of the proposed haul road were difficult to access and therefore a thorough search for Eucalyptus 



beardiana (R) and Verticordia dichroma var. syntoma (P3) was not conducted. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Flora and Vegetation 

 

16. 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

 



Fire appears to have played a role in defining the boundaries between some of the floristically similar 

shrubland communities. There is evidence of recent fire(s) in Community S1 from burnt stumps, a 

shallow layer of ash below the soil surface and the low and closed structure of the community. In 

comparison, Communities S2 and S3 appear to have no evidence of recent fire(s) and typically have a 

mature and open structure. The similar species composition but contrasting structure of these 

communities, suggests that Community S1 may represent a younger successional stage of either 

Community S2 or S3. In the absence of fire, local edaphic factors or other site differences will then 

presumably determine if an S1 community will succeed into either S2 or S3. The latter patterns may also 

assist in proposed rehabilitation programs as the passage of fire may assist in the re-establishment of 

some species from litter and seed stock.  



5.

 

DISCUSSION 

The proposed Coburn mineral sand mine is located south of Shark Bay. The survey area overlaps with a 

part of the Southern Carnarvon Basin, which is a region that until recently was poorly known botanically 

(Keighery  et al. 2000). The region was first mapped by Beard (1976) and more recently, surveys have 

been conducted in the Shark Bay World Heritage Property by Trudgen and Keighery (1995) and the 

Southern Carnarvon Basin by Keighery et al. (2000) and Gibson et al. (2000). The broad composition and 

pattern of the flora reflects the major floristic boundary that runs through the region, defining the 

Southwestern and Eremaean Botanical Provinces (Beard 1976). This boundary represents the transition 

from the diverse Kwongan and woodlands of southwestern Australia and the less diverse Acacia 

shrublands of the Carnarvon Basin, which is imposed by major climatic and soil gradients across the area. 

This major floristic boundary is a defining feature of the flora in the survey area and is reflected by the 

diverse range and high endemism of the species and plant communities recorded in the present study.  

 

The extensive shrubland and Eucalypt communities in the Amy Zone are a distinctive element of the 



Shark Bay flora and were first recognised by Beard (1976) who broadly described the vegetation as “Tree 

Heath” or heath with occasional trees. Importantly, Beard (1976) reported that this vegetation type is 

endemic to the Shark Bay area. The distinctive feature of this vegetation is it contains Acacias that are 

typical of the arid Eremaean region but also contains elements of the diverse Kwongan and woodlands of 

southwestern Australia, including members of the Proteaceae and the Myrtaceae. Beard (1976) first 

determined this vegetation to have affinities with the Southwestern Botanical Province, but floristic, 

climatic and edaphic evidence from Gibson et al. (2000) currently suggests a closer affinity to the 

Eremaean Botanical Province. This regionally significant vegetation structure encompasses the 

Communities E1, E2, E3, E4, E6, E7, S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6, S10 and M1 that were mapped in the 

present study. Of these communities, on the basis of aerial photograph interpretations, the dominant 

communities of S1, S2 and S3 appear to be extensive and occur well beyond the boundaries of the survey 

area into the World Heritage area.  Many of the Eucalypt (E prefix in community codes) communities 

extend beyond the survey area.  The actual extent of the different shrub and Eucalypt communities 

beyond the survey boundaries should be clearer after the additional work proposed for the coming 

months.         

 

A number of communities with significant local conservation values were defined in the current study. 



Those communities in which Priority species were recorded are classified as locally significant. 

Communities S5, S8, S9 and S10 are of particular local significance, as priority species constitute a 

dominant element of the species composition. The Communities S2 and S3 are also significant as they 

have a mature, open structure, which is important for the establishment of the late successional Priority 

species (Jacksonia dendrospinosa (P4) and Scholtzia sp. Folly Hill (P2)), and may also be important for 

maintaining high reptile diversity (as found in S3, Ninox Wildlife Consulting 2004)). There is also a high 

diversity of vertebrate fauna in the northern section of the survey area, which may be associated with the 

diverse mosaic (M1) communities (Ninox Wildlife Consulting 2004).  

 

 

 



 

 


Flora and Vegetation 

 

17. 



URS0404/08/04  

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD 


 

 

 



The floristic boundary between the Southwestern and Eremaean Botanical Provinces that overlies the 

survey area was reflected in the biogeographical pattern of the species in the present study. Many species 

recorded are commonly found in the Southwestern Botanical District and are at the northern limit of their 

distribution, while other species common in the Eremaean Botanical District are at the southern or eastern 

limit of their distribution. There are also 13 taxa that are restricted to the intermediate zone between the 

two districts and are endemic to Shark Bay. 

 

The significance of the nine Priority Flora species recorded in the survey area was reviewed in relation to 



the potential impact by the proposed mining operations and their broader distribution. The proposed 

mining operations pose the greatest threat to Eremophila occidens (ms) (P2) as it is locally common in 

the survey area but its distribution beyond the area is highly restricted (only four collections from two 

isolated areas). Secondly, Acacia subrigida (P2) may need further taxonomic revision as some of the 

populations recorded previously from Shark Bay have different leaf morphology. Acacia drepanophylla 

(P3), Grevillea rogersoniana (P3) and Macarthuria intricata (P3) are significant, as they are endemic to 

Shark Bay. Finally, the presence of Grevillea stenostachya (P3) in the survey area represents a significant 

range extension from other known populations. It is important to note that the distribution of the Priority 

flora in the survey area is likely to be more extensive than current maps indicate, which are based on a 

limited number of site recordings. Additionally, the area surrounding Shark Bay is a centre of Acacia 

species diversity and hybridisation, and there are many species complexes in the area that may include 

taxa that are currently undescribed (B. Maslin, pers. comm.). Therefore, other species that may have 

specific conservation significance could also occur in the area. 

 

A total of 231 taxa (including subspecies and varieties) from 131 genera and 51 families were recorded in 



the present study. In comparison, Gibson et al. (2000) recorded 245 taxa over a similar area adjacent to 

the Coburn survey area (Appendix A). A similar composition of species was collected in the present 

study with the exception of the priority species listed in Table 4. Trudgen and Keighery (1995) recorded 

528 taxa over a larger area, which included Nanga Station, Western Hamelin station, Tamala Station, 

Coburn Station, Zuytdorp National Park, Cooloomia Nature Reserve and associated crown land 

(Appendix A). The authors also recorded a range of Rare and Priority Flora that were not recorded in the 

survey area (Table 4). The distribution of the majority of these species lie outside the survey area, while 

others may not have been detected in the present study due to low rainfall or they occur at extremely low 

population densities. 



Yüklə 2,41 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə