Vegetation, Flora and Wetland Survey at the Wonnerup South Mineral Sands Deposit



Yüklə 1.22 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü1.22 Mb.

Vegetation, Flora and Wetland Survey at the 

Wonnerup South Mineral Sands Deposit 



For 

Cristal Mining Australia 

 

December 2012 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Russell Smith MPhil (Plant Ecology) BSc (Hons) 

 

Ekologica Pty Ltd 



PO Box 207 Bunbury 

WA 6230 


Ph: (08) 9725 4014

 

 



Contents 

Summary ........................................................................................................................................................ 2 

1.  Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 3 

2.  Location, Landscape and Soils ................................................................................................................ 3 

3.  Vegetation and Flora .............................................................................................................................. 3 

3.1.  Broadscale Vegetation Mapping .................................................................................................... 3 

3.2.  Previous Vegetation Survey of the Study Area .............................................................................. 4 

4.  Regulatory Context ................................................................................................................................. 6 

4.1.  Threatened and Priority Flora ........................................................................................................ 6 

4.2.  Threatened and Priority Ecological Communities .......................................................................... 6 

5.  Methods ................................................................................................................................................. 9 

6.  Results and Discussion ........................................................................................................................... 9 

6.1.  Flora including Rare Flora ............................................................................................................... 9 

6.2.  Plant Communities ......................................................................................................................... 9 

6.3.  Vegetation Condition ...................................................................................................................10 

6.4.  Conservation Significance of the Vegetation ...............................................................................10 

7.  Conclusions ..........................................................................................................................................11 

8.  References ............................................................................................................................................13 

Appendix 1. List of vascular flora found in the study area. ..........................................................................15 

Appendix 2. Species Lists at Releve Sites .....................................................................................................17 

Appendix 3. Pictures of the Study Area Plant Communities. .......................................................................19 

 

 



 

 


 

Summary 

 

Ekologica Pty Ltd was commissioned by Ennovate Consulting on behalf of Cristal Mining Australia 



Resources Incorporating Cable Sands (Cristal Mining Australia Resources) to review flora and vegetation 

values at native remnants occurring on privately owned farmland (Lot 3819), Wonnerup South. The 

study area, comprising 233.8 ha, is situated 6 km east south east of the town of Busselton. 

 

All  remnant native vegetation and several areas of wetland, comprised almost exclusively of introduced 



species, was surveyed on 27

th

 October 2012. Only forty species of flora were identified within the study 



area, of which thirty were introduced species. 

 

No plant taxa gazetted as Declared Rare Flora pursuant to subsection (2) of section 23F of the Western 



Australian Wildlife Conservation Act (1950) or listed as Endangered under the Commonwealth 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 were located.  Additionally, no Priority 

Flora as defined by the Department of Environment and Conservation were located within the study 

area. 

 

Four plant communities were recognized in the study area, all of which consisted of an overstorey of 



natives trees and an understorey of introduced species (pasture species and agricultural weeds). 

Although one of the communities (Corymbia calophylla and Eucalyptus marginata woodland) probably 

was once an occurrence of the threatened ecological community “Corymbia calophylla woodlands on 

heavy soils of the southern Swan Coastal Plain” (SCP01b),  the only resemblance now is in the overstorey 

species and because of the absence of native understorey taxa it could not be considered an occurrence 

of the TEC. 

 

Due to their small size (< 2 ha) and ongoing grazing all of the remnants lack a native understorey 



component and there was no regeneration of the native overstorey species. All were assessed as 

“completely degraded” using the definition of Keighery (1994). 

 

Some of the remnants of native vegetation in the study area occur on the Abba Plains soil-landscape 



system, of which only 5% of the pre-European extent remains uncleared and none is contained in secure 

reserves (Molloy et al., 2007). Both of the vegetation complexes represented by the study area remnants 

are considered to be poorly reserved, with less than the target 15% in secure conservation reserves (EPA, 

2006).  


However, because of their absence of native understorey species and of regeneration by the native 

overstorey species the study area remnants are considered to have little or no conservation value as 

representatives of Abba Plains vegetation. 

 


 

 



1.

 

Introduction 

Cristal Mining Australia Resources Ltd are preparing the necessary approvals for the development of the 

Wonnerup South mineral sands deposit.  As part of this process, Cristal Mining Australia had vegetation 

survey work conducted by Onshore Environmental Consultants on Lot 7 to the east of Sues Road and 

part Lot 3819 in 2006, and on Lot 7 only in 2009. Ekologica Pty Ltd was contracted to carry out a further 

Spring survey of part Lot 3819 to finalize the vegetation survey and to prepare a report that presented 

the results of this survey and to summarize previous findings with regard to vegetation and flora in the 

Study Area. The Study Area on Lot 3819 covers 233.8 ha (Fig. 1). In addition, a specific wetland buffer 

study was required of the Study Area to support an application to clear native vegetation under the 

Environmental Protection Act 1986.  

2.

 

Location, Landscape and Soils 

The Study Area is located on the Swan Coastal Plain 6 km east south east of the town of Busselton. It is 

flanked to the east by Sues Road and by Bussell Highway to the north. Soils and landforms have been 

mapped by Tille and Lantzke (1990). This mapping shows that the Study Area is situated on the Abba 

Plain land system, a depositional feature formed of Quaternary alluvium, lying between 10 – 40 m above 

sea level and containing extensive areas of poor drainage.  

The dominant landform pattern is an intricate patchwork of slight depressions and slight rises.  The 

deeper depressions may become inundated in winter, while the rises tend to suffer subsoil waterlogging.  

The northern third of the Study Area has soils belonging to the Cokelup wet clayey flats mapping unit, a 

narrow band of sandy soil belonging to the Bassendean soil-landscape system (overlying the Abba Plain 

system) traverses the Study Area on a south-west to north-east axis and the southern portion has sandy 

grey brown duplex (Abba) and gradational (Busselton) soils of the Abba wet flats and Abba flats mapping 

units. A narrow band of recent alluvial soils lies along the Abba River on the eastern boundary of the 

Study Area (Tille and Lantzke 1990).  



3.

 

Vegetation and Flora 

3.1.

 

Broadscale Vegetation Mapping 

The study area occurs in the Drummond Subdistrict of the Darling Botanical District, in the Southwest 

Botanical Province (Beard 1981).  Before clearing for agriculture over the last 150 years the original 

vegetation of the Abba Plain was an open woodland dominated by marri (Corymbia calophylla), jarrah 

(Eucalyptus marginata) and banksia (Banksia grandis). The Bassendean Dune system carried woodland 

dominated by jarrah, Agonis flexuosa and Banksia attenuata.  Along the drainage lines and on flats and 

depressions Eucalyptus rudis occurred with Melaleuca rhaphiophylla, or on some waterlogged flats a 

myrtaceous scrub dominated. 



 

The vegetation of the southern Swan Coastal Plain was mapped at a broad scale (1: 250,000) by Smith 



(1973) and this mapping was digitized by Shepherd et al. (2002). The original vegetation of the northern 

portion of the Study Area (on the Cokelup wet clayey flats) is mapped as “Low forest: peppermint 

(Agonis flexuosa)”, which is unlikely considering the clayey soil. The narrow band of Bassendean Dune 

sand running through the Study Area was mapped by Shepherd et al. (2002) as “Low woodland; banksia” 

and the southern portion, on sandy grey brown duplex (Abba) and gradational (Busselton) soils is shown 

as “Medium woodland; marri with some jarrah, wandoo, river gum and casuarina” 

The vegetation complex mapping by Mattiske and Havel (1998) did not include the part of the Swan 

Coastal Plain where the Study Area is situated, however vegetation complex mapping has since been 

extended to include the study area (SWBP, 2007). This mapping shows the remnants in the northern part 

of the study area and along the Sabina River as belonging to the Ludlow (Lw) vegetation complex, and 

the remnants on the central sandy ridge as being Abba (Ad) vegetation complex. 

3.2.

 

Previous Vegetation Survey of the Study Area 

A survey of the remnants of native vegetation in the Study Area (as well as the adjacent Lot 7) was 

carried out by Onshore Environmental in April 2006. Four plots were established within the remnants, all 

rated as “Completely Degraded”, and the following communities were described; 

 

Agonis flexuosa Low Forest A over *Lolium rigidum Dense Low Grass 



 

Corymbia calophylla/Agonis flexuosa Forest A over *Lolium rigidum Low Grass 

 

Melaleuca rhaphiophylla Low Forest A over *Zantedeschia aethiopica/*Rumex pulcher Open 



Dwarf Scrub D over *Lolium rigidum Low Grass 

 



Corymbia calophylla Woodland over *Rumex pulcher Open Dwarf Scrub D over *Lolium rigidum 

Low Grass 

On the sandy rise, where most of the remnants occur they were  comprised of a sparse canopy of 

Corymbia calophylla and Agonis flexuosa, with scattered trees of Eucalyptus marginata ssp. marginata 

and Banksia attenuata. Native understorey taxa were virtually absent, due mainly to ongoing livestock 

grazing. 

Ninety four plant taxa (including varieties and sub-species) were recognized in Lots 7 and 3819, of which 

37 were introduced species (Onshore Environmental, 2006). No breakdown in numbers occurring on the 

separate lots was provided but it is assumed that most of them occurred on Lot 7 where the remnants 

were larger and marginally less degraded. No plant taxa gazetted as Declared Rare Flora pursuant to 

subsection (2) of section 23F of the Wildlife Conservation Act (1950) were located.  Additionally, no 

Priority Flora as defined by the Department of Environment and Conservation (2012a) were located 

within the Lot 7 and Lot 3819 survey areas (Onshore Environmental, 2006). 

 


 

 

Figure 1. Location of Study Area on Lot 3819, Wonnerup South.



4.

 

Regulatory Context 

 

4.1.



 

Threatened and Priority Flora 

Species of flora and fauna are defined as Declared Rare or Priority conservation status where their 

populations are restricted geographically or threatened by local processes.  The Department of 

Environment and Conservation (DEC) recognises these threats of extinction and consequently applies 

regulations towards population and species protection. 

 

Rare Flora species are gazetted under Subsection 2 of Section 23F of the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 



and therefore it is an offence to “take” or damage rare flora without Ministerial approval.  Section 23F of 

the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950-1980 defines “to take” as “… to gather, pick, cut, pull up, destroy, dig 

up, remove or injure the flora or to cause or permit the same to be done by any means.” 

 

Priority Flora are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in need of further survey 



(Priority One to Three) or require monitoring every 5-10 years (Priority Four).  Table 1 presents the 

categories of Declared Rare and Priority Flora as defined by the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 

(Department of Environment and Conservation 2012a). 

 

Threats of extinction of species are also recognised at a Federal Government level and are categorized 



according to the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act),  

(Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, 2012a).   

 

A search was made of Naturemap (DEC, 2012b) for Declared Rare Flora and Priority Flora occurring 



within 10 km of the Survey Area. The sixty taxa of DRF and PF occurring within this area are shown in 

Table 2. All of the DRF species are also listed as Endangered under the EPBC Act. All of the taxa would 

have been flowering, or at least have been identifiable at the time of survey. 

4.2.

 

Threatened and Priority Ecological Communities 

 

Threatened Ecological Communities (TECs) are communities afforded special protected under the 



Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 because they are subject to processes that threaten to destroy or 

significantly modify them across much of its range.  TECs are categorized as presumed totally destroyed, 

critically endangered, endangered or vulnerable (DEC, 2012a). Some TECs are also listed as matters of 

national significance under the Commonwealth EPBC Act (Department of Sustainability, Environment, 

Water, Population and Communities, 2012b).  Potential TECs that do not meet the survey criteria or that 

are not adequately defined, are added to a Priority Ecological Community (PEC) list under priority 

categories of 1, 2, 3 or 4 (DEC, 2012c).   

 

Three occurrences of threatened ecological communities occur with 10 km of the Study Area, these 



being “Corymbia calophylla woodlands on heavy soils of the southern Swan Coastal Plain” (SCP01b),  

 

“Herb rich saline shrublands in clay pans” (SCP07) and “Shrublands on dry clay flats” (SCP10a) (FCT07) all 



of which are listed as “Vulnerable” (Department of Environment and Conservation, 2012b). 

 

Several priority ecological communities are known from within a 10 km radius of the study area (DEC, 



2012d), including ; 

 



 

Eucalyptus cornutaAgonis flexuosa and Eucalyptus decipiens forest on deep yellow-brown 

siliceous sands over limestone (‘Busselton Yate community’) - Priority 1 

 

Eucalyptus rudisCorymbia calophyllaAgonis flexuosa  Closed Low Forest (near Busselton) – 



Priority 1 

 



Eucalyptus patensCorymbia calophyllaAgonis flexuosa  Closed Low Forest (near Busselton) 

 

 



 

Table 1. Categories of Declared Rare and Priority Flora as defined by the  

 Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 

CATEGORY 

CATEGORY 

“Taxa which have been adequately searched for and are deemed to be in the wild either rare, in 



danger of extinction, or otherwise in need of special protection and have been gazetted as such.' 

P1 


“Taxa which are known from one or a few  (generally <5) populations which are under threat, 

either due to small population size, or being on lands under immediate threat. Such taxa are 

under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in urgent need of further survey.” 

P2 


Taxa which are known from one or a few (generally <5) populations, at least some of which are 

not believed to be under immediate threat. Such taxa are under consideration for declaration as 

‘rare flora’, but are in urgent need of further survey.” 

P3 


“Taxa which are known from several populations, and the taxa are not believed to be under 

immediate threat (i.e. not currently endangered), either due to the number of known populations 

(generally >5), or known populations being large, and either widespread or protected. Such taxa 

are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in need of further survey.” 

P4 

“Taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed and which, whilst being rare (in 



Australia), are not currently threatened by any identifiable factors. These taxa require monitoring 

every 5-10 years.” 



 

 

 

 

 

 

SPECIES 

STATUS 

FLOWERING  SPECIES 

STATUS 

FLOWERING 

Acacia flagelliformis 

P4 


May-Sep 

Isopogon formosus subsp. dasylepis 

P3 


Jun-Dec 

Acacia semitrullata 

P4 


May-Oct 

Jacksonia gracillima 

P3 


Oct-Nov 

Actinotus whicheranus 

P2 


Dec-Mar 

Johnsonia inconspicua 

P3 


Oct-Nov 

Amperea micrantha 

P2 


Oct-Nov 

Kennedia lateritia 

DRF 


Oct 

Angianthus drummondii  

P3 


Oct-Dec 

Lambertia echinata subsp. occidentalis 

DRF 


Feb-Dec 

Aponogeton hexatepalus 

P4 


Jul-Oct 

Lambertia orbifolia subsp. Scott River Plains (L.W. Sage 684)  

DRF 


Oct-Jan 

Banksia meisneri subsp. ascendens 

P4 


Apr-Sep 

Lasiopetalum membranaceum 

P3 


Sep-Dec 

Banksia nivea subsp. uliginosa 

DRF 


Aug-Sep 

Laxmannia jamesii 

P4 


May-Jul 

Banksia squarrosa subsp. argillacea 

DRF 


Jun-Nov 

Leptomeria furtiva 

P2 


Aug-Oct 

Blennospora doliiformis 

P3 


Oct-Nov 

Lepyrodia heleocharoides 

P3 


Dec 

Caladenia huegelii   

DRF 


Sep-Oct 

Loxocarya magna 

P3 


Sep-Nov 

Caladenia procera 

DRF 


Sep-Oct 

Myriophyllum echinatum 

P3 


Nov 

Calothamnus quadrifidus subsp. teretifolius ms 

P4 


Nov-Dec 

Ornduffia submersa  

P4 


Sep-Oct 

Cardamine paucijuga 

P2 


Sep-Oct 

Pimelea ciliata subsp. longituba   

P3 


Oct-Dec 

Caustis sp. Boyanup (G.S. McCutcheon 1706) 

P3 


Dec-Jan 

Puccinellia vassica 

P1 


Sep-Nov 

Chamaescilla gibsonii  

P3 


Sep 

Pultenaea pinifolia   

P3 


Oct-Nov 

Chamelaucium sp. Yoongarillup (G.J. Keighery 3635) 

P4 


Nov-Feb 

Schoenus benthamii 

P3 


Oct-Nov 

Chordifex gracilior 

P3 


Sep-Dec 

Schoenus natans 

P4 


Oct 

Chorizema carinatum   

P3 


Oct-Dec 

Schoenus pennisetis 

P1 


Aug-Sep 

Conospermum paniculatum   

P3 


Jul-Nov 

Stylidium longitubum 

P3 


Oct-Dec 

Drakaea elastica  

DRF 


Oct-Nov 

Synaphea hians   

P3 


Jul-Nov 

Eryngium sp. Ferox (G.J. Keighery 16034)  

P3 


Nov 

Synaphea petiolaris subsp. simplex 

P2 


Sep-Oct 

Eryngium sp. Subdecumbens (G.J. Keighery 5390)  

P3 


Nov 

Thomasia laxiflora 

P3 


Oct-Nov 

Eucalyptus rudis subsp. cratyantha   

P4 


Jul-Sep 

Thysanotus glaucus 

P4 


Oct-Nov 

Franklandia triaristata   

P4 


Aug-Oct 

Trichocline sp. Treeton (B.J. Keighery & N. Gibson 564)  

P2 


Nov-Jan 

Gastrolobium sp. Yoongarillup (S. Dilkes s.n. 1/9/1969 

P1 


Aug-Oct 

Verticordia attenuata 

P3 


Dec-May 

Grevillea brachystylis subsp. brachystylis 

DRF 


Aug-Nov 

Verticordia densiflora var. pedunculata 

DRF 


Dec-Jan 

Grevillea bronwenae 

P2 


Jun-Dec 

Verticordia lehmannii 

P4 


Aug-Apr 

Grevillea elongata 

DRF 


Oct 

Verticordia plumosa var. ananeotes 

DRF 


Nov-Dec 

Hakea oldfieldii 

P3 


Aug-Oct 

Verticordia plumosa var. vassensis 

DRF 


Sep-Feb 

 

Table 2. Declared Rare Flora and Priority Flora occurring within 10 km of the Survey Area. 

5.

 

Methods 

 

The Wonnerup South Study Area was surveyed on 27



th

 October 2012; all areas of remnant vegetation as 

well as several wetland areas comprised almost exclusively of introduced taxa were searched. Vegetation 

structure and condition (method of  Keighery, 1994) and species data were collected from nine releves 

approximately 10 m in diameter sited within bushland remnants (seven releves) and wetlands with no 

native overstorey species (two releves). Description of vegetation structure follows the height, life form 

and density classes based on those of Muir (1977) and Aplin (1979). A comprehensive list of vascular 

flora occurring within the Study Area was compiled, with species not able to be identified in the field 

being collected or photographed for later identification. Nomenclature follows that of the Western 

Australian Herbarium (DEC, 2012d, 2012e).   



6.

 

Results and Discussion 

6.1.

 

Flora including Rare Flora 

 

Forty species of flora were identified within the study area, of which thirty were introduced species 



(Appendix 1). Species representation was highest amongst the Poaceae (11 species) and Myrtaceae (7 

species). Species lists for each of the releve sites is presented in Appendix 2. 

 

No plant taxa gazetted as Declared Rare Flora pursuant to subsection (2) of section 23F of the Wildlife 



Conservation Act (1950) or listed as Endangered under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity 

Conservation Act 1999 were located.  Additionally, no Priority Flora as defined by the Department of 

Environment and Conservation (2012a) were located within the study area. 

 

6.2.

 

Plant Communities 

The total area of “remnant vegetation” in the study area, defined as clumps of five or more trees within 

20 m of each other, is about 8.5 ha comprised of twelve separate areas (Fig. 2). Other individual trees, or 

small groups of trees occur outside these areas of remnant vegetation. None of the remnants are fenced 

to exclude livestock. Four plant communities were recognized in these areas of remnant vegetation 

(photos of the communities are presented in Appendix 3); 

A.

 

Eucalyptus rudis  and Agonis flexuosa woodland over grassland/herbland of introduced taxa 



including *Pennisetum clandestinum 

B.

 



Corymbia calophylla and Eucalyptus marginata woodland over Agonis flexuosaNuytsia floribunda 

low woodland over grassland/herbland of *Lolium rigidum, *Hordeum leporinum, *Arctotheca 



calendula  and other introduced species 

C.

 



Melaleuca rhaphiophylla low woodland over grassland/herbland of *Lolium rigidum, *Hordeum 

leporinum, *Arctotheca calendula  and other introduced species 

10 

 

D.



 

Melaleuca rhaphiophylla low forest over *Zantedeschia aethiopica and *Rumex pulcher herbland 

In addition there were areas of wetland or dampland vegetation, too small to map, where the native 

rush Juncus pallidus occurred along with the introduced rush *J. microcephalus and other non-native 

species such as *Cotula coronopifolia, *C. turbinata and *Trifolium hirtum



6.3.

 

Vegetation Condition 

All of the areas of remnant native vegetation were assessed as “completely degraded” using the method 

of Keighery (1994). This condition rating is defined as: 

 

“The structure of the vegetation is no longer intact and the area is completely or almost 



completely without native species. These areas are often described as ‘parkland cleared’ with 

the flora comprising weed or crop species with isolated native trees or shrubs” 

None of the areas of remnant vegetation in the study area had evidence of regeneration of native 

species. This is probably because of vigorous competition from established non-native species and the 

effects of grazing. The study area is situated in one of the earliest-settled parts of the State where 

livestock grazing has occurred for more than 150 years. 



6.4.

 

Conservation Significance of the Vegetation 

It is likely that the Corymbia calophylla and Eucalyptus marginata woodland community described in 

section 6.2 (Community A) would once have had affinities with the “Corymbia calophylla woodlands on 

heavy soils of the southern Swan Coastal Plain” (SCP01b) floristic community type, which is a threatened 

ecological community. However, apart from the tree overstorey the remnants bear no resemblance to 

this or any other threatened or priority ecological community. Without intensive restoration works it is 

unlikely that any of the remnants in the study area will again function as a native ecosystem. 

Some of the plant communities in the study area (communities A, C, D) occur on the Abba Plains soil-

landscape system, of which only 5% of the pre-European extent remains uncleared and none in secure 

reserves (Molloy et al., 2007). The two vegetation complexes represented in the study area, Ludlow (Lw) 

and Abba (Ad) have 24% and 14% of their pre-European area remaining respectively (Mattiske 

Consulting and Havel, 2002, Webb et al., 2009). There is 9% of Ludlow (Lw) and none of the Abba (Ad) in 

secure conservation reserves. Despite the figure of 24% remaining given for the Ludlow (Lw) complex it is 

likely that much of this is in less than “good” condition, particularly the remnants on private property 

and the Pinjarra (Abba) Plain/ Spearwood Dunes interface wetlands, such as occurs in the northern part 

of the study area (Webb et al., 2009). 

 

Because of their high level of degradation the areas of remnant vegetation in the study area have little 



value with regard to floristic values, having no native species in the understorey and no more than three 

or four native species in any one remnant. The likelihood of natural regeneration within these remnants 

is very low because of grazing by livestock and the competition from established pasture species and 

therefore they are not self-sustaining (Spooner et al., 2002, Duncan et al., 2007). 



11 

 

7.



 

Conclusions 

 

A spring survey of remnant native vegetation and areas of wetland comprised almost exclusively of 



introduced species was carried out within a 234 ha area of Lot 3819, Wonnerup, proposed for mineral 

sands extraction. Only forty species of flora were identified within the study area, of which thirty were 

introduced species. 

 

No plant taxa gazetted as Declared Rare Flora pursuant to subsection (2) of section 23F of the Western 



Australian Wildlife Conservation Act (1950) or listed as Endangered under the Commonwealth 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 were located.  Additionally, no Priority 

Flora as defined by the Department of Environment and Conservation were located within the study 

area. 

 

Four plant communities were recognized in the study area, all of which consisted of an overstorey of 



natives trees and an understorey of introduced species (pasture species and agricultural weeds). 

Although one of the communities (Corymbia calophylla and Eucalyptus marginata woodland) probably 

was once an occurrence of the threatened ecological community “Corymbia calophylla woodlands on 

heavy soils of the southern Swan Coastal Plain” (SCP01b),  the only resemblance now is in the overstorey 

species and because of the absence of native understorey taxa it could not be considered an occurrence 

of the TEC. 

 

Due to their small size (< 2 ha) and ongoing grazing all of the remnants lack a native understorey 



component and there was no regeneration of the native overstorey species. All were assessed as 

“completely degraded” using the definition of Keighery (1994). 

 

Some of the remnants of native vegetation in the study area occur on the Abba Plains soil-landscape 



system, of which only 5% of the pre-European extent remains uncleared and none is contained in secure 

reserves (Molloy et al., 2007). Both of the vegetation complexes represented by the study area remnants 

are considered to be poorly reserved, with less than the target 15% in secure conservation reserves (EPA, 

2006).  


However, because of their absence of native understorey species and of regeneration by the native 

overstorey species the study area remnants are considered to have little or no conservation value as 

representatives of Abba Plains vegetation.


 

 

Figure 2. Plant communities in the study area with releve sites indicated.



8.

 

References 

 

Aplin,  T.E.H.  (1979).  The  flora.  In:  Environment  and  Science.  Ed:  B.J.  O’Brien.  University  of  WA  



Press, Perth. 

Beard, J.S. (1981). Vegetation survey of Western Australia, Swan 1:1,000,000. Vegetation series, 

explanatory notes to Sheet 7. UWA. Press, Perth. 

Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) (2012a). Listing of species and ecological 

communities. http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/content/view/852/2010/ 

Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) (2012b).  Naturemap, Western Australian 

Herbarium. 

Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) (2012c). List of Threatened Ecological Communities 

on the (TEC) Database endorsed by the Minister for the Environment (August 2010). 

http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/content/view/849/2017/ts-tec-endorsed-by-minister-august-

2010.pdf 

Department of Environment and Conservation (2012d). Priority Ecological Communities for Western 

Australia: Version 13 (13 April 2012). Department of Environment and Conservation. 

https://www.dec.wa.gov.au/content/view/849/2017/ 

Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) (2012e).  Florabase, Western Australian Herbarium. 

Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) (2012f). Species Database Management Software 

(Max), updated 7th June 2012. Department of Environment and Conservation, Western 

Australian Herbarium. 

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. (2012a). Threatened 

species under the EPBC Act. 

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species.html 

Duncan, D., Moxham, C. and Read, C. (2007). Effect of stock removal on woodlands in the Murray Mallee 

and Wimmera Bioregions of Victoria. Report to North Central Catchment Management Authority 

and Mallee Catchment Management Authority, Victoria. 

Environmental Protection Authority (2006) Level of Assessment for Proposals affecting Natural Area 

within the System 6 Region and Swan Coastal Plain Portion of the System 1 Region. Guidance 

Statement No. 10, June 2006, Perth. 

Gibson, N., Keighery, B.J., Keighery, G.J., Burbidge, A.H. and Lyons, M.N. (1994). A floristic survey of the 

southern Swan Coastal Plain: report to Heritage Council of W.A. and Australian Heritage 

Commission. Department of Environment and Conservation, Western Australia. 



14 

 

Keighery, B. J. (1994). Bushland Plant Survey: A guide to plant community survey for the community. 



Wildflower Society of Western Australia (Inc.), Nedlands 

Mattiske, E.M. and Havel, J.J., 1998. Vegetation Complexes of the South-west Forest Region of Western 

Australia. Maps and report prepared as part of the Regional Forest Agreement. Western 

Australia for the Department of Environment and Conservation and Environment Australia. 

Western Australia. 

Mattiske Consulting and Havel. J.J. (2002). Review of management options for poorly represented 

vegetation complexes. Report to the Conservation Commission of Western Australia. 

Molloy, S., O'Connor, T., Wood, J. and Wallrodt, S. (2007). Reservation levels of vegetation complexes 

and systems with reserve status as at June 2006. Local Government Biodiversity Planning 

Guidelines: Addendum to the South West Biodiversity Project Area, Western Australian Local 

Government Association, West Perth. 

Muir, B.G. (1977). Biological Survey of the Western Australian Wheatbelt. Part II. Vegetation and habitat 

of Bendering Reserve. Records of the West Australian Museum, Supplement No. 3. 

Onshore Environmental Consultants. (2006).  Flora and Vegetation Survey, Grice and Location 7 

Properties, May 2006. Unpublished report for Cristal Mining Australia Resources Ltd. 

Shepherd, D.P., Beeston, G.R. & Hopkins, A.J.M. (2002). Native Vegetation in Western Australia: Extent, 

Type and Status. Resource Management Technical Report 249. Department of Agriculture, 

Government of Western Australia. 

Smith, F.G. (1973). Vegetation Survey of Western Australia, 1:250,000 series. Busselton & Augusta. 

Western Australian Department of Agriculture, Perth, WA. 

South West Biodiversity Project. (2007). Mapping & Information Instalment 2 January 2007. 

Spooner, P., Lunt, L. and Robinson, W. (2002). Is fencing enough? The short-term effects of stock 

exclusion in remnant grassy woodlands in southern NSW. Ecological Management and 

Restoration, 3: 2. 

Tille, P.J. and Lantzke, N.J. (1990). Busselton-Margaret River-Augusta land capability study. Western 

Australian Department of Agriculture, Land Resources Series No. 5. 

Webb, A, Keighery, B.J., Keighery, G.J., Longman, V. (2009). The flora and vegetation of the Busselton 

Plain (Swan Coastal Plain) : a report for the Department of Environment and Conservation as 

part of the Swan Bioplan Project. Dept. of Environment and Conservation, Perth, Western 

Australia. 

 

 

 



15 

 

 



 

 

 



Appendix 1. List of vascular flora found in the study area.

16 

 

 



FAMILY 

LATIN NAME 

VERNACULAR 

NATURALISED 

Araceae 


Zantedeschia aethiopica 

Arum Lily 

Asteraceae 



Arctotheca calendula 

Cape Weed 

  

Cotula coronopifolia 



Waterbuttons 

  



Cotula turbinata 

Funnel Weed 

  

Hypochaeris glabra 



Smooth Catsear 

  



Sonchus oleraceus 

Common Sowthistle 

Boraginaceae 



Echium plantagineum 

Paterson's Curse 

Fabaceae 



Lotus subbiflorus 

  



  

Trifolium hirtum 

Rose Clover 

Geraniaceae 



Erodium botrys 

Long Storksbill 

  

Pelargonium capitatum 



Rose Pelargonium 

Juncaceae 



Juncus microcephalus 

 



 

Juncus pallidus 

Pale Rush 

  

Loranthaceae 



Nuytsia floribunda 

Christmas Tree 

  

Lythraceae 



Lythrum hyssopifolia 

Lesser Loosestrife 

Malvaceae 



Malva parviflora 

Marshmallow 

Myrtaceae 



Agonis flexuosa 

Peppermint 

  

  

Corymbia calophylla 



Marri 

  

  



Eucalyptus marginata subsp. marginata 

Jarrah 


  

  

Eucalyptus rudis 

Flooded Gum 

  

  



Melaleuca preissiana 

Moonah 


  

  

Melaleuca rhaphiophylla 

Swamp Paperbark 

  

  



Melaleuca viminea 

Mohan 


planted  

Orobanchaceae 



Orobanche minor 

Lesser Broomrape 

Poaceae 


Anthoxanthum odoratum 

Sweet Vernal Grass 

  

Avena barbata 



Bearded Oat 

  



Bromus diandrus 

Great Brome 

  

Cynodon dactylon 



Couch 

  



Ehrharta longiflora    

Annual Veldt Grass 

  

Holcus lanatus 



Yorkshire Fog 

  



Hordeum leporinum 

Barley Grass 

  

Lolium perenne    



Perennial Ryegrass 

  



Lolium rigidum 

Wimmera Ryegrass 

  

Pennisetum clandestinum 



Kikuyu Grass 

  



Poa annua 

Winter Grass 

Polygonaceae 



Rumex brownii 

 



 

Rumex crispus 

Curled Dock 

 

Rumex pulcher 



Fiddle Dock 

Ranunculaceae 



Ranunculus muricatus 

Sharp Buttercup 

Solanaceae 



Solanum linnaeanum 

  



 

Solanum nigrum 

 



 

 

 



17 

 

Appendix 2. Species Lists at Releve Sites



18 

 

 



LATIN NAME 

Site 1 

Site 2 

Site 3 

Site 4 

Site 5 

Site 6 

Site 7 

Site 8 

Site 9 

Agonis flexuosa 

 



 

 



 

 



 

Arctotheca calendula 

 

 





 

 





Bromus diandrus 

 



 

 



 

 



 

Corymbia calophylla 

 

 



 



 

 



 

Cotula coronopifolia 

 

 



 

 



 

 



 

Cotula turbinata 

 

 



 

 

 



 



 

Cynodon dactylon 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Echium plantagineum 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 





Ehrharta longiflora    



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Eucalyptus marginata  

 

 



 

 



 

 

 



 

Eucalyptus rudis 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Hordeum leporinum 

 





 





Hypochaeris glabra 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 





Juncus microcephalus 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

Juncus pallidus 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

Lolium perenne    

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Lolium rigidum 

 

 



 

 



 





Lotus subbiflorus 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

Lythrum hyssopifolia 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

Melaleuca rhaphiophylla 

 



 

 

 



 

 





Melaleuca viminea 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Nuytsia floribunda 

 

 



 

 



 

 

 



 

Pelargonium capitatum 

 

 



 

 



 

 

 



 

Pennisetum clandestinum 

 



 

 



 

 



 

Poa annua 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

Ranunculus muricatus 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

Rumex brownii 

 

 



 

 



 

 

 



 

Rumex crispus 

 

 



 

 



 

 

 





Solanum linnaeanum  

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Solanum nigrum 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

Rumex pulcher 

 

 



 

 

 



 



 

Solanum nigrum 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

Trifolium hirtum 

 

 



 

 



 

 



 

Zantedeschia aethiopica 

 



 

 

 



 



 

 


19 

 

 



 

 

Appendix 3. Pictures of the Study Area Plant Communities. 

 


20 

 

 



Plant Community AEucalyptus rudis  and Agonis flexuosa woodland over grassland/herbland of 

introduced taxa including *Pennisetum clandestinum 

 

 

 



Plant Community BCorymbia calophylla and Eucalyptus marginata woodland over Agonis flexuosa

Nuytsia floribunda low woodland over grassland/herbland of *Lolium rigidum, *Hordeum leporinum

*Arctotheca calendula  and other introduced species 



21 

 

 



 

Plant Community CMelaleuca rhaphiophylla low woodland over grassland/herbland of *Lolium rigidum

*Hordeum leporinum, *Arctotheca calendula  and other introduced species 



 

 

 



Plant Community DMelaleuca rhaphiophylla low forest over *Zantedeschia aethiopica and *Rumex 

pulcher herbland 

Document Outline

  • Summary
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Location, Landscape and Soils
  • 3. Vegetation and Flora
    • 3.1. Broadscale Vegetation Mapping
    • 3.2. Previous Vegetation Survey of the Study Area
  • 4. Regulatory Context
    • 4.1. Threatened and Priority Flora
    • 4.2. Threatened and Priority Ecological Communities
  • 5. Methods
  • 6. Results and Discussion
    • 6.1. Flora including Rare Flora
    • 6.2. Plant Communities
    • 6.3. Vegetation Condition
    • 6.4. Conservation Significance of the Vegetation
  • 7. Conclusions
  • 8. References
  • Appendix 1. List of vascular flora found in the study area.
  • Appendix 2. Species Lists at Releve Sites
  • Appendix 3. Pictures of the Study Area Plant Communities.



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə