Venice Commission Council of Europe Publishing



Yüklə 5,01 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə5/25
tarix07.03.2017
ölçüsü5,01 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   25
raison d’être. This relationship
between dreams and the opinions of others is just as valid for the artist wielding
a paintbrush.
The poet’s cry from the heart, appeal to reason, ardent desire for intelligence
and spontaneous deferral to wisdom all make us want to build a world in which
the co-existence of peoples, civilisations, cultures and religions can flourish under
the banner of freedom, thereby becoming conviviality, love and friendship.
In the face of so much disorder in a disturbed world, so much incomprehen-
sion, so many misunderstandings, so much rejection, so much blasphemy, which
defame their victims and degrade their perpetrators, perhaps we ought to refer

Conference on Art and Sacred Beliefs: from Collision to Co-existence
79
to the inspiring humanist works of great artists who have left their indelible mark
in the form of enduring, vital points of reference, and who are united by history
despite their differing backgrounds and beliefs and the fact that they express
themselves in different languages and are separated by both distance and time.
I would like to talk about four events, each of which serves as an example of
constructive tolerance, greatness of spirit and emotional intelligence.
Let us begin with St Francis of Assisi, the apostle who in 1219, scorning earthly
favours and pleasures, devoted his life to human happiness and went to the
Pope as a pilgrim of humanity to exhort him to suspend the crusades because,
in his view, Christianity and Islam were soulmates and the offspring of one and
the same God.
In 1229, Francis of Assisi went to meet the Governor of Egypt, Sultan Al-Kamil,
the nephew of Saladin, to join with him in opening, under their combined aus-
pices, the first dialogue between Christian and Muslim theologians in the city of
Damietta.
It was this very Al-Kamil who granted to Frederick II, Emperor of Germany and
King of Sicily, a man of culture and fluent in Arabic, a right of passage to holy
sites for Christian pilgrims, the neutrality of Jerusalem and a right of access to
the holy sites of Nazareth and Bethlehem, and then sent him scholars and art-
ists in various disciplines to make Palermo into a city of culture and civilisation.
Drawing on more recent times, I would like to mention the Amir Abdelkader, a
statesman, military leader, philosopher and poet. In 1860, in Damascus, where
he was living in exile from his native Algeria, he and his men saved 12000 Chris-
tians condemned to certain death. A crowd of fanatical, manipulated Muslims
having decided to massacre the Christians, for reasons too lengthy to explain,
Abdelkader gave refuge to all the Christians of Damascus in his own home and
those of his lieutenants. He went to fetch them himself, under the protection of his
arms. He worked day and night to finish the task he had set himself, then sat in
front of his house and promised a monetary reward from his personal funds to
anyone who brought him a Christian alive. This admirable feat earned him writ-
ten recognition and presents from all the kings and princes of the time, headed
by the Pope.
The agitated crowd responded to his gesture by shouting out loud: “You who
once fought the Christians in Algeria, why do you now try to stop us aveng-
ing their insults? Deliver us those you have hidden in your house.” He replied:
“What you are doing is a culpable act, contrary to God’s law. As for me, I did
not fight Christians, but conquerors claiming to be Christians.” When Bishop
Pavy of Algiers wrote to thank him in 1862, he answered as follows: “We had
a duty to do right by the Christians, out of respect for the Muslim faith and the
rights of humanity”. Respect for the rights of humanity! Surely this is already the

Blasphemy, insult and hatred
80
thinking of a harbinger, his words presaging the 1948 Universal Declaration of
Human Rights.
Today, tensions caused by a number of factors are making the world an unstable
and hence a less safe place. As well as wars and other social scourges, factors
such as exclusion, intolerance and rejection of those who are different make it
harder for us to find spiritual peace and serenity, and may spark fresh conflicts.
If freedom is to retain some degree of moral ethics, it must refrain from all forms
of profanation, insult and abuse. Any act with the potential to generate verbal
or physical violence must be deplored and condemned.
To some extent, the law can condemn blasphemy and abuse, and punish insults.
While this is necessary, however, it is not sufficient, as recent history shows only
too well. Aside from the fact that they selectively target the sacred beliefs of
one part of the world, such insults can be used to justify violent retaliation in the
name of self-defence, thereby creating a source of tension and multiple, unpre-
dictable conflicts. In addition to these dangers, such insults open rifts of mistrust
and hatred that may lead to confrontations between communities living in the
same country.
If legal rules alone cannot deal with blasphemy and other insults in the form of
cartoons, writings or paintings, can we simply leave it up to artists to search their
own consciences and thereby submit to the throes of remorse? Is it possible to do
evil without hatred, or good without love?
On the subject of remorse, Victor Hugo is known to have been devastated by
the death of his daughter Léopoldine, who drowned in the Seine along with her
husband. He wrote a number of famous poems railing against fate, going so far
as to curse and blaspheme in his anger; then, as time tempered the emotion of
his sobs, he returned to God, exclaiming:
For all are sons of the same father,
We are all the same tears wept by the same eye.
Further on, he adds:
Lord, I realise that Man is crazy
If he dares complain;
I’ve stopped accusing, I’ve stopped cursing,
But let me weep!
Remorse is a kind of guilty distress that inhabits our hearts once we have com-
mitted our crime, like Abel’s uncontrollable remorse after he killed his brother
Cain. The great Arab critic Taha Hussein was right when, in a surge of generosity
towards human beings, he wrote:
All I wish on my friend
And all I wish on my enemy,
Were it possible for me to wish him well,
Is that God spare him cause for remorse.

Conference on Art and Sacred Beliefs: from Collision to Co-existence
81
This goes to show that remorse can sometimes be more painful than criminal
sanctions.
Can we not dream – for dreams are not forbidden – that one day, thanks to
human beings’ fertile imaginations and constructive determination, voices will
rise up in every chapel in which the one God is worshipped in order to call for
love in a context of diversity and respect for each and every one of us; that in
every school and university, as places and vehicles for the transmission of know-
ledge, voices will rise up to spread the same message, the same values of toler-
ance and respect for difference, and to shape the human beings and artists of
the future; and lastly that, like the Olympic flame that set off from this legendary
ancient city, an Olympic flame will be lit for friendship between civilisations and
dialogue between the athletes of arts and letters, disciplines which are known
to have been part of the Olympic Games before being abolished by the Roman
Emperor Theodosius in 394?
This noble ideal can be realised only by means of a universal, well-organised
movement promoting the alliance of civilisations, which strikes me as one of the
best ways to reconcile cultures and civilisations and to make art the product
of a harmonious balance between freedom of expression, as a principle that
fosters artistic creativity and respect for others’ sacred beliefs and symbols. To
my mind, striking such a balance will mean we successfully rise to the challenge
of co-existence and democracy.
I would like to finish by quoting two eloquent statements from witnesses of the
First World War, which artists may find inspiring. Firstly, Georges Clemenceau
set himself apart from Jules Ferry, who was advocating colonial expansion in the
name of the superiority of races and civilisations, by declaring from the rostrum
in the Bourbon Palace:
The Hindus, an inferior race? The Chinese, an inferior race? No, the so-called
superior nations have no rights over inferior nations. Let us not attempt to cloak vio-
lence in the hypocritical name of civilisation.
The other statement, from another Georges, this time by the surname of Duhamel,
reinforces my argument. Duhamel, on seeing the shells falling in the trenches of
eastern France, the thousands of wounded piled up in makeshift camps and the
surgeons busy amputating arms and legs, exclaimed:
Civilisation is not to be found in the surgeon’s knife.
If civilisation is not in the heart of man,
then it exists nowhere.

83
The Church will have many clashes with the human rights movement. The Church
is not only for human rights, but surpasses them, since in the position of rights,
which is a legal concept, it puts forward the concept of service. In the position of
what the law permits, it puts forward free service and dedication. Nevertheless, the
Church cannot accept what the leader of this world promotes through the human
rights movement: the abolition of sin. What they want to present as a right is not
respect for the human person but his obliteration; the interdiction for man to feel
his weakness before God, his sinful nature. The impossibility of the human being to
show repentance and be forgiven is to be set about. In other words, the abolition of
moral consciousness and its replacement by legal rules is planned. In the world they
prepare, there will no longer be sins but only legal infringements. … But I can say
that for the Orthodox Church, love for art will constitute a criterion of its own abil-
ity to respond to the well-being of its flock because the more our societies become
impersonal and massive, the more the Church must conceive of art as a weapon of
defence of the human being against the powers of alienation. I will not accept, of
course, that all art expresses the face of man. I am well aware that much is offen-
sive and strips him bare. However, art remains far and beyond, a loyal ally and a
strong weapon in the battle of the human being in facing depressive circumstances,
in breathing freely and feeling the breath of God.
(Archbishop Christodoulos, Delphi, 5 July 2006
)
It appears that the ambivalence in the relationship between religion and art is
rather difficult to overcome: the sacred has always been a source of inspiration
and the reason for the production of masterpieces in all arts. On the other side,
however, the freedom of artistic expression has been severely violated in the
name of religion as much today as in the past. Every society is thus called upon
to strike a balance between these two dimensions, freedom of religion and free-
dom of art. The conflict between them is fundamentally a political matter and not
a theological or an aesthetic issue. Can the sensibilities of religious communities
restrict the freedom of individuals to determine, on their own, what art is? To
what extent can liberated art provoke the religious feelings of devout communi-
ties? Are there any limits and, if yes, how are they set? In the final analysis, how
does democracy balance the two freedoms and to what extent does this balance
qualify a regime as democratic?
44
44
.
These questions were addressed in the international symposium on Art and Sacred Beliefs:
from Collision to Co-existence, organised by the European Commission for Democracy through Law
4. Art can legitimately offend
Dimitris Christopoulos
Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and History,
Pantheon University, Athens, President of the Hellenic League for Human Rights
Dimitri Dimoulis
Professor of Jurisprudence and Constitutional Law, Law School
Fundação Getúlio Vargas, São Paulo, Brazil

Blasphemy, insult and hatred
84
We may agree, by way of introduction, that although religion and art are
doomed to co-exist in conditions of tension, it is important that any solutions
arise from rational consultation between people, believers and non-believers,
and not from court rulings or, even worse, violence. The threat of violence,
however, can easily cause any attempt to balance freedom of art and respect
for religious convictions to deviate, to the detriment of free art. The tribulations
of the Danish cartoons of Muhammad have created a gloomy atmosphere for
freedom of art in Europe. The view that seems to prevail is that freedom of art
cannot allow people to make representations that can reasonably be expected
to offend the religious sensibilities of believers. As we will try to explain, this is
a very risky view for democracy.
One solution, which has been put to the test as much by the Catholic as by the
Christian Orthodox Church, is the revival of the offence of blasphemy that has
been relied upon from time to time in order to censor “blasphemous works” and
punish their makers and those responsible for their presentation to the public.
In 2006 a Christian Orthodox minister, in his testimony as witness for the pros-
ecution in the trial against the curator of Outlook, an international exhibition of
contemporary art organised in Athens, said: “Nobody’s personal perversion
can be allowed to qualify as art”.
45
The exhibition included a painting by the
Belgian painter Thierry de Cordier, which was considered as offensive against
Christ. In the end, the art historian and curator who was forced to consent to
withdraw Cordier’s painting, as a result of the surge of protests from the Church
and a number of politicians, was acquitted on 10 May 2006. So, this is how
the latest case of art censorship was settled in Greece after a flurry of publicity:
the painting was censored and the curator was acquitted.
46
Does this perhaps
mean that all sides can claim victory? Not quite. “Do you wish the defendant to
be put in prison?” asked the defence counsel of the same minister who testified
as prosecution witness. “For my part, I am satisfied that the painting was taken
down”, answered the witness.
Let us state the obvious. The right to freedom of expression is non-negotiable. It
is not an absolute right, but it forms an integral part of any society that purports
to be democratic. The limits to this freedom must be sought in the moral dam-
age, suffering or pain it might cause to actual persons. But should such limits
apply in all cases of moral damage? In all cases of suffering? In all cases of
pain? Certainly not. As Ronald Dworkin brilliantly put it, “so in a democracy
(www.venice.coe.int) of the Council of Europe in co-operation with the Hellenic League for Human
Rights (www.hlhr.gr).
45
.
Excerpt from the testimony of M. Epifanios, prosecution witness in the criminal trial of the Outlook
exhibition curator on 10 March 2006 (see the newspaper Elefterotypia, 11 May 2006).
46
.
This case prompted the publication of a collection of essays, including a detailed account of
art censorship cases in Greece: G. Ziogas, L. Karabinis, G. Stavrakakis and D. Christopoulos (eds),
Aspects of censorship in Greece, Eds. Nefeli, 2008 (Γ. Ζιώγα , Λ. Καραµπίνη , Γ. Σταυρακάκη , .
Χριστόπουλο , επιµ. Όψει λογοκρισία στην Ελλάδα).

Conference on Art and Sacred Beliefs: from Collision to Co-existence
85
no-one, however powerful or impotent, can have a right not to be insulted or
offended.”
47
There is no place in our societies for a generalised right of everyone not to be
offended. For, if such a right existed, we would be heading for a system of
social organisation where any allegation of offence by anyone would become
an obstacle to the exercise of any freedom. Muslims would never be allowed to
build a mosque in Athens because that would sincerely and deeply offend the
sensibilities of Christian residents and church authorities (as it is claimed today),
visual artists would not be judged or appraised by their peers but by those who
take offence at their works, and so on and so forth. In short, in the name of
respecting the sacred convictions of a given community, the possibility of indi-
vidual or collective freedom is abolished. The “freedom” to be able to prohibit
any offending or ridiculing of our values is not only a sign of personal and pol-
itical immaturity but also a clear expression of intolerance.
A religious Greek professor of law made this statement, which should frankly dis-
arm and reassure all believers who take offence at having their beliefs attacked:
“God does not need the support of the prosecutor to confirm His presence, nor
can He be considered as a legally protected interest for He is the beginning and
the end of all legally protected interests.”
48
To put it simply, whoever offends religion by word or art may well go to hell,
but not to prison. The priest quoted at the beginning of this article affirms that:
“Nobody’s personal perversion can be allowed to qualify as art”. But how many
of us would be willing to leave the crucial power of defining art to the (average)
priest (or judge)? If liberal constitutions bestow unreserved immunity on a given
category of activities in view of their artistic nature, then reasonably the key to
the special constitutional protection of any such activity must lie in the diagnosis
of its artistic character. To make this possible, however, one must have a more
or less fixed view of what should or should not qualify as art. And this is even
more difficult.
For any effort to tackle the problems arising from the idea of an unreserved free-
dom of art presupposes an appropriate definition of art, a definition that would
place outside the scope of constitutional immunity any acts, items or situations
that, albeit claiming to be of an artistic nature, appear to infringe fundamental
rights, interests or values. The technique of restriction by definition raises the
question: who is to judge and on what grounds? The history of art is a history
of violent restrictions prompted not by lack of artistic value but by the opposition
of a particular artistic expression to the aesthetic, moral or political preferences
of those in power.
47
.
R. Dworkin, “The right to ridicule”, New York Review of Books, Vol. 53/5 (23 March 2006).
48
.
A. Kostaras, “Freedom of art and penal law” in Democracy-Freedom-Security [volume in trib-
ute to Ioannis Manoledakis], Eds. Sakoulas, Athens/Thessaloniki, 2005, p. 428 (Α. Κωστάρα ,
“Ελευθερία τη Τέχνη και Ποινικό ίκαιο” σε: Τιµητικό τόµο για τον Ιωάννη Μανωλεδάκη,
ηµοκρατία-Ελευθερία-Ασφάλεια).

Blasphemy, insult and hatred
86
Lately, starting from the emblematic story of the Danish cartoons of the prophet
Muhammad, violent restrictions to freedom of art emanate not only from the
blasphemous nature of artistic works against the dominant religion in Europe but
also against the major minority religion. The virulent indignation of part of the
Muslim world at the publication of the cartoons in 2006 and the more subdued
reactions two years later against the documentary film (of extreme-rightist inspir-
ation) Fitna, by the Dutch politician Geert Wilders, frame the question “freedom
of expression or freedom to insult?” in totally Manichaean terms, as if freedom
of opinion were limited only to compliments and innocuous utterances. Accord-
ing to one of the most classical formulations of the European Court of Human
Rights, however, in a democratic society this freedom involves mainly disturbing
or shocking views.
49
In our times, the prevailing view on freedom of art has receded disquietingly
due to fear of Islamic reaction. Evidently, contemporary restrictions are not con-
cerned so much with the outdated cloak of blasphemy as they are with a new
cloak: the dictates of political correctness and the restriction of hate-speech. The
penalisation of blasphemy is no longer fashionable, though it is still used by sev-
eral jurisdictions to remind Europe of its not so distant obscurantist past. Now-
adays, the endeavour to protect beliefs, ethnic groups or religions has shifted to
the penalisation of “intolerant” or “racist” speech. But this is actually a retreat:
why in the name of offending religion – in this case Islam and Judaism – are
we accepting prosecutions that would be unthinkable in other contexts?
50
Why
should the religious sensibilities of some people command more respect than
the political sensitivities of civil war victims in Spain or Greece who have to put
up with seeing statues of their exterminators in public squares? The only politi-
cally honest answer is that, in the first case, the right to free expression retreats
before the reasonable fear of uncontrollable reactions whereas, in the second
case, freedom of art prevails because reactions can be controlled. Honest as this
answer may be, it is a pure case of normative double standards.
But why do reactions in the name of these religious sensibilities inspire fear for
the cohesion of our societies, whereas others do not? The answer is, once again,
obvious. The social position of Muslim immigrants in Europe and the interna-
tional geopolitical state of affairs in the relationships between East and West,
49
.
“Freedom of expression constitutes one of the essential foundations of such a society, one of the
basic conditions for its progress and for the development of every man. Subject to Article 10.2, it is
applicable not only to ‘information’ or ‘ideas’ that are favourably received or regarded as inoffensive
or as a matter of indifference, but also to those that offend, shock or disturb the State or any sector
of the population. Such are the demands of that pluralism, tolerance and broadmindedness without
which there is no ‘democratic society’.” Handyside v. United Kingdom, 7 December 1976, para. 49,
www.worldlii.org/eu/cases/ECHR/1976/ 5.html.
50
.
Let us recall the most extreme example: on 20 February 2006, the British historian David
Irving was sentenced to three years’ imprisonment by an Austrian court and was actually incarcerated
for a few months for the views he published in one of his books in 1989 on denial of the Jewish Holo-
caust. See www.independent.co.uk/news/europe/irving-gets-three-years-jail-in-austria-for-holocaust-
denial-467280.html

Conference on Art and Sacred Beliefs: from Collision to Co-existence
87
with emphasis on the Middle East, makes some Muslims susceptible to the lures
of the most reactionary political ideology of our times. The antidotes to the devel-
opment of Islamic fundamentalism, however – namely, the equitable social inte-
gration of immigrants and the struggle against imperialist politics in the Middle
East – entail an incomparably higher political, ideological and economic price.
By contrast, free art or free expression is the weak link. It can be curtailed at no
political or economic cost.
51
Nonetheless, given more careful consideration, the
long-term implications of these restrictions for the conquests of liberal democracy
bode nothing good for the future.
In early 2005, a 61-year-old German businessman thought it a good idea to
write the word 

Yüklə 5,01 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   25




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə