Verticordia albida is commonly known



Yüklə 0,95 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü0,95 Mb.

Verticordia albida is commonly known 

as white featherflower. It is a tall shrub, 

up to three metres in height and 

develops a straggly appearance when 

mature. Masses of large white feathery 

flowers with pink centres are produced 

on spikes from November to January.

Fred Lullfitz collected the first specimen 

of this spectacular featherflower in 

1961. Numerous surveys since then 

have located only a handful of places 

where it occurs. The species grows 

amongst dense scrub on grey to yellow 

sand over laterite. 

Vegetation clearance is considered to 

be the principal cause of the rarity of 

the species. The extremely restricted 

distribution of the species is a major 

threat to its survival, and any local threat 

may result in its extinction in the wild.

In 1992 the species was accorded a 

Priority One rating. However, the low 

numbers of plants and the threats 

associated with narrow road reserves 

warranted upgrading of its status to 

declared rare flora in 1994. It was 

ranked as critically endangered in 

September 1995.

DEC has set up the Moora District 

Threatened Flora Recovery Team to 

coordinate recovery actions that address 

threats to the survival of the species in 

the wild (see overleaf).

Major threats to the populations 

are weed invasion, inappropriate 

fire regimes, grazing and drift of 

agricultural chemicals. The roadside 

population is also at risk from dieback 

disease (caused by plant pathogens) 

and accidental destruction.

The species is currently known from 

only a few populations and DEC is keen 

to know of any others. 

If unable to contact the District Office 

on the above number, please phone 

DEC’s Species and Communities Branch 

on (08) 9334 0455.

White featherflower

E

n



d

a

n



g

e

r



e

d

 



f

l

o



r

a

 



o

f

 



W

e

s



t

e

r



n

 

A



u

s

t



r

a

l



i

a

Recovery of a species



DEC is committed to ensuring that critically endangered taxa do not become 

extinct in the wild. This is done through the preparation of a Recovery Plan or 

Interim Recovery Plan (IRP), which outline the recovery actions that are required to 

urgently address those threatening processes most affecting the ongoing survival 

of the threatened species in the wild and begin the recovery process.

IRPs are prepared by DEC and implemented by regional or district recovery teams 

consisting of representatives from DEC, Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority, 

community groups, private landowners, local shires and various government 

organisations.

If you think you’ve seen this plant, please call the  

Department of Environment and Conservation’s (DEC’s)  

Moora District on (08) 9652 1911.

Close up of the white featherflower, note the pink centres and the feathery petals. Photo – Emma Richardson


2008025-0608-500

White featherflower

E

n



d

a

n



g

e

r



e

d

 



f

l

o



r

a

 



o

f

 



W

e

s



t

e

r



n

 

A



u

s

t



r

a

l



i

a

Recovery actions that 



have been, and will be, 

progressively implemented to 

protect the species include:

Protection from current threats:  

control of weeds; conducting further 

surveys; and regular monitoring of the 

health of the populations.



Protection from future threats: 

continued implementation of the 

approved translocation proposal; 

maintenance of dieback hygiene;  

maintenance of buffers of natural 

vegetation around populations;  

development of a fire management 

strategy; collection and storage of seed 

at DEC’s Threatened Flora Seed Centre; 

maintenance of live plants away from 

the wild (i.e. in botanical gardens); and 

researching the biology and ecology 

of the species. Other actions include 

ensuring that relevant authorities, 

landowners and DEC staff are aware 

of the species’ presence and the need 

to protect it, and that all are familiar 

with the threats identified in the Interim 

Recovery Plan.

Above: Flower spikes of white featherflower.   

Below: Multiple flower spikes of the white featherflower. Photos – Emma Richardson

IRPs will be deemed a success if the 

number of individuals within the 

population and/or the number of 

populations have increased.

This project is funded by the 

Australian and State governments’ 

investment through the Natural 

Heritage Trust, administered in the 

Midwest Region by the Northern 



Agricultural Catchments Council.

Roadside habitat of white featherflower.  

Photo – Gina Broun


Yüklə 0,95 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə