Verticordia



Yüklə 446,49 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü446,49 Kb.

 

 

 



 

 

INTERIM RECOVERY PLAN NO. 323 



 

HAY RIVER FEATHERFLOWER / SCRUFFY 

VERTICORDIA 

 

(Verticordia apecta) 

 

INTERIM RECOVERY PLAN 



 

2012–2017 

 

 



 

March 2012 

Department of Environment and Conservation 

Warren Region 



 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

2

 



FOREWORD 

 

Interim  Recovery  Plans  (IRPs)  are  developed  within  the  framework  laid  down  in  Department  of  Conservation  and  Land 



Management  (CALM)  Policy  Statements  Nos.  44  and  50.  Note:  the  Department  of  CALM  formally  became  the 

Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) in July 2006. DEC will continue to adhere to these Policy Statements 

until they are revised and reissued. 

 

These plans outline the recovery actions that are required to urgently address those threatening processes most affecting the 



ongoing survival of threatened taxa or ecological communities, and begin the recovery process. 

 

DEC is committed to ensuring that Threatened taxa are conserved through the preparation and implementation of Recovery 



Plans (RPs) or IRPs, and by ensuring that conservation action commences as soon as possible and, in the case of Critically 

Endangered taxa, always within one year of endorsement of that rank by the Minister. 

 

This  plan  will  operate  from  March  2012  to  February  2017  but  will  remain  in  force  until  withdrawn  or  replaced.  It  is 



intended that, if the taxon is still ranked as Critically Endangered in WA, this plan will be reviewed after five years and the 

need for further recovery actions assessed. 

 

This plan was given regional approval on  30



th

 March 2012 and was approved by the Director of Nature Conservation on 

19

th

  April  2012.  The  provision  of  funds  identified  in  this  plan  is  dependent  on  budgetary  and  other  constraints  affecting 



DEC, as well as the need to address other priorities. 

 

Information in this plan was accurate at March 2012. 



 

PLAN PREPARATION 

 

This  plan  was  prepared  by  Nikki  Rouse



1

,  Karlene  Bain

2

,  Roger  Hearn



3

,  Andrew  Brown

4

,

 



Cassidy  Newland

and  Robyn 



Luu

6



 

1

 Former Flora Conservation Officer, DEC Frankland District, South Coast Highway, WALPOLE 6398 



2

 Nature Conservation Coordinator, DEC Frankland District, South Coast Highway, WALPOLE 6398 

3

 Regional Ecologist, DEC Warren Region, Locked Bag 2, MANJIMUP, WA 6258 



4

 Threatened Flora Coordinator, DEC Species and Communities Branch, Locked Bag 104, Bentley Delivery  Centre, WA 

6983. 

5

 Former BCI Threatened Flora Project Officer, DEC, Warren Region, Locked Bag 2, MANJIMUP 6258. 



6

 Project Officer, DEC Species and Communities Branch, Locked Bag 104, Bentley Delivery Centre, WA 6983. 

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

 

The following people provided assistance and advice in the preparation of this plan: 



 

Brad Barton 

Regional Leader, DEC Warren Region 

Anne Cochrane 

Senior Research Scientist, DEC Science Division 

Janine Liddelow 

Flora Officer, DEC Frankland District 

John Riley 

Previously Administrative Officer Flora, DEC Species and Communities Branch 

Amanda Shade 

Assistant Curator (Nursery), Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority 

 

Thanks also to the staff of the W.A. Herbarium for providing access to Herbarium databases and specimen information. 



 

Cover photograph by Janine Liddelow. 

 

CITATION 

 

This Interim Recovery Plan should be cited as: Department of Environment and Conservation (2012) Verticordia apecta



Interim  Recovery  Plan  20122017.  Interim  Recovery  Plan  No.  323.  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation, 

Western Australia. 



 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

3

 



SUMMARY 

 

Scientific Name: 



Verticordia apecta 

Common Name: 

Scruffy Verticordia/Hay River Featherflower 



Family: 

Myrtaceae 



Flowering Period: 

November 



DEC Region: 

Warren 


DEC District: 

Frankland 



Shire: 

Plantagenet 



NRM Region: 

South Coast Natural Resource Management Inc. 



Recovery Team: 

Warren Region Threatened Flora Recovery Team (WRTFRT) 

 

Illustrations and/or further information: George, E. A. and George, A. S. (1994) New Taxa of Verticordia (Myrtaceae: 

Chamelaucieae)  from  Western  Australia.  Nuytsia  9  (3):  33-341;  George,  E.  A.  (2002)  Verticordia:  the  turner  of  hearts. 

University of Western Australia Press, Perth, Western Australia; Hearn R.W., Meissner R., Brown A.P., Macfarlane T.D., 

and Annels T.R. (2006)  Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in  the Warren Region. Department of Environment and 

Conservation,  Perth,  Western  Australia;

 

Western  Australian  Herbarium  (1998−)  FloraBase  −  The  Western  Australian 



Flora. Department of Environment and Conservation. http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/. 

 

Current status: Verticordia apecta is declared as rare flora (DRF) under the Western Australian Wildlife Conservation Act 



1950  and  is  ranked  as  Critically  Endangered  (CR)  under  International  Union  for  Conservation  of  Nature  (IUCN  2001) 

criteria B1ab(ii,v) in WA due to it being known from a single population and there being a continuing decline in the area of 

occupancy  of  mature  individuals.  The  species  is  listed  as  Critically  Endangered  under  the  Environment  Protection  and 

Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act 1999). The main threats to the species are dieback disease, fire, feral pigs, 

grazing, weeds, small population size, poor recruitment and competition. 



 

Description:  Verticordia  apecta  is  a  lignotuberous  slender  shrub  to  45  cm  tall  with  linear  lower  stem  leaves  3  to  9  mm 

long and upper narrow elliptic stem leaves about 7 mm long. Floral leaves are elliptic to obovate. Flowers are scarce in the 

upper axils and have peduncles 9 to 19 mm long. Sepals are deep pink with white fine fringe segments (Hearn et al. 2006). 

 

Habitat requirements: Verticordia apecta is known from a single population in an area approximately 8m

2

 adjacent to the 



Hay  River,  southwest  of  Mt  Barker.  It  grows  in  sandy  clay  with  loam  and  broken  granite  on  a  west-facing  slope  in 

Eucalyptus wandoo low open woodland and low open shrub land. 

 

Habitat critical to the survival of the species, and important populations: 



 

Verticordia apecta is ranked in WA as CR, and as such it is considered that all  known habitat for the  wild population is 

critical to the survival of the species and that the wild population is an important population. Habitat critical to the survival 

of  V.  apecta  includes  the  area  of  occupancy  of  the  population,  areas  of  similar  habitat  surrounding  the  population  (these 

providing potential habitat for population expansion and for pollinators), additional occurrences of similar habitat that may 

contain  undiscovered  populations  of  the  species  or  be  suitable  for  future  translocations,  and  the  local  catchment  for  the 

surface and/or groundwater that maintains the habitat of the species. 

 

Benefits to other species or ecological communities: Recovery actions implemented to improve the quality or security of 

the  habitat  of  Verticordia  apecta  will  also  improve  the  status  of  associated  native  vegetation.  The  species  occurs  in 

association with three Priority species. 

 

International  obligations:  This  plan  is  fully  consistent  with  the  aims  and  recommendations  of  the  Convention  on 

Biological Diversity, ratified by Australia in June 1993, and will assist in implementing Australia’s responsibilities under 

that  Convention.  The  species  is  not  listed  under  Appendix  II  in  the  United  Nations  Environment  Program  World 

Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), and 

this plan does not affect Australia’s obligations under any other international agreements. 



 

Role  and  interests  of  Indigenous  people:  A  search  of  the  Department  of  Indigenous  Affairs  Aboriginal  Heritage  Sites 

Register  revealed  no  sites  of  Aboriginal  significance  adjacent  to  the  population  of  Verticordia  apecta.  Input  and 

involvement  is  being  sought  through  the  South  West  Aboriginal  Land  and  Sea  Council  (SWALSC)  and  Department  of 

Indigenous  Affairs to determine if there are any issues or interests. Indigenous opportunity  for  future involvement in  the 

implementation of the Recovery plan is included as an action in the plan. 

 

Social and economic impact: The implementation of this recovery plan may cause some economic impact to DEC through 

the  cost  of  implementing  recovery  actions.  Also,  as  the  population  is  located  near  private  property,  its  conservation  may 

potentially affect activities on that land.

 

 



 

Affected  interests:  The  known  population  is  on  Crown  land  vested  in  the  Conservation  Commission  and  managed  by 

DEC. 


 

 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

4

 



Evaluation of the plan’s performance: DEC, with assistance from the Warren Region Threatened Flora Recovery Team 

(WRTFRT), will evaluate the performance of this plan. In addition to annual reporting on progress and evaluation against 

the criteria for success and failure, the plan will be reviewed following four years of implementation. 

 

Existing recovery actions: The following recovery actions have been or are currently being implemented. 

 

1.

 



Cuttings  were  collected  in  2000  and  2005  by  Frankland  District  staff  for  propagation  trials  by  Botanic  Gardens  and 

Parks Authority (BGPA). 

2.

 

Potential habitat has been surveyed by field staff from DECs Frankland District, Warren Region and Science Division. 



3.

 

A fire response plan has been developed by DEC Frankland District to be used in the event of further wildfires in the 



area. 

4.

 



Genetic material was collected from Verticordia habranthaV. endlicheriana var. angustifolia and V. apecta and sent 

to DEC Science Division to investigate the potential of the species being a hybrid. 

5.

 

Staff from DEC’s Frankland District regularly monitors the single known population of the species. 



6.

 

The  WRTFRT  is  assisting  DEC  to  coordinate  recovery  actions  for  Verticordia  apecta  along  with  other  threatened 



species  in  the  Region.  Information  on  progress  in  implementing  recovery  actions  will  be  reported  through  annual 

reports to DEC's Corporate Executive and funding bodies. 



 

Objective: The objective of this plan is to abate identified threats and maintain or enhance populations to ensure the long-

term preservation of the species in the wild. 

 

Recovery Criteria 

 

Criteria for success: The number of populations has increased and/or the number of mature individuals has increased by 

20 per cent or more over the term of the plan. 

 

Criteria for failure: The number of populations has decreased and/or the number of mature individuals has decreased by 

20 per cent or more over the term of the plan. 

 

Recovery actions 



 

1.

 



Coordinate recovery actions 

9.

 



Undertake regeneration trials 

2.

 



Confirm species through genetic analysis 

10.


 

Undertake surveys 

3.

 

Collect and hold propagation material 



11.

 

Implement fire response plan 



4.

 

Monitor population 



12.

 

Develop and implement a translocation proposal 



5.

 

Obtain biological and ecological information 



13.

 

Promote awareness 



6.

 

Determine Phytophthora cinnamomi susceptibility 



14.

 

Map habitat critical to the survival of Verticordia 



apecta 

7.

 



Map and monitor dieback fronts 

15.


 

Liaise with Indigenous groups 

8.

 

Maintain disease hygiene 



16.

 

Review this plan and assess the need for further 



recovery actions 

 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

5

 



1. 

BACKGROUND 

 

History 

 

Verticordia  apecta  was  first  collected  by  Elizabeth  George  and  Tony  Annels  while  visiting  a  small  V. 

endlicheriana var. angustifolia population in 1993. The species was described by Elizabeth and Alex George the 

following year. Despite searches of the known location and other similar sites in and adjacent to the area, the 

species was not seen again until 1999 (Hearn et al. 2006). 

 

The single population currently consists of 22 mature plants and encompasses an area approximately 10m² on a 



granite outcrop  adjacent to  the Hay River, southwest of Mt Barker. The population was burnt in a wildfire in 

autumn 2004. When inspected in November 2005, plants had resprouted and 10 were flowering at that time. An 

additional four nearby plants are believed to be Verticordia apecta but were not flowering when last seen and 

this could not be confirmed. No seedlings were present. 

 

Description 

 

Verticordia apecta is a lignotuberous slender shrub to 45 cm tall with linear lower stem leaves 3 to 9 mm long 

and upper narrow elliptic stem leaves about 7 mm long. Floral leaves are elliptic to obovate. Flowers are scarce 

in the upper axils and have peduncles 9 to 19 mm long. Sepals are deep pink with white fine fringe segments 

(Hearn et al. 2006). 

 

The species name is derived from the Greek apektos meaning uncombed or unkempt, in reference to the untidy 



appearance  of  the  flowers.  The  species  differs  from  Verticordia  habrantha  in  having  flowers  with  coarsely 

lobed and fringed petals, and from Vinclusa in its spindly habit and scruffy striped pink and white flowers with 

more sparsely fringed sepals (George 2002). 

 

Distribution and habitat 

 

Verticordia apecta is known from a single population in an area approximately 8m

2

 adjacent to the Hay River, 



southwest  of  Mt  Barker.  It  grows  in  sandy  clay  with  loam  and  broken  granite  on  a  west-facing  slope  in 

Eucalyptus  wandoo  low  open  woodland  and  low  open  shrub  land.  Associated  species  include  Verticordia 

habranthaGastrolobium coriaceumGrevillea acerosaHypocalymma angustifolium and V. endlicheriana var. 

angustifolia

 

Map 1: Distribution of Verticordia apecta 



 

 

 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

6

 



Table 1: Summary of population land vesting, purpose and tenure 

 

Pop. No. & Location 

DEC 

District 

Shire 

Vesting 

Purpose 

Manager 

1. SW of Mt Barker 

Frankland 

Plantagenet 

Conservation 

Commission of WA 

Conservation of Flora 

and Fauna 

DEC 

 

Biology and ecology 



 

The  intermediate  morphological  appearance  of  Verticordia  apecta  and  the  lack  of  seedlings  present  in  the 

population have brought into question the current taxonomy of the species. It has been suggested that V. apecta 

may be a hybrid between a combination of V. habranthaV. endlicheriana var. angustifolia and/or V. densiflora. 

However, informal investigations undertaken so far from material collected from V. habranthaV. endlicheriana 

var. angustifolia and V. apecta by DEC Science Division suggest that Vapecta has little genetic similarity to V



endlicheriana var. angustifolia and a strong affinity with Vhabrantha. However, the floristic appearance of V

habrantha is so dissimilar from Vapecta that it is unlikely to be a mutation. So unless another parent plant can 

be found its hybrid status is unlikely to be proven. It is also possible that all stems  may arise from a common 

lignotuber and genetic analysis is thus required to investigate if it is a clone. 

 

Verticordia  apecta  appears  to  regenerate  from  underground  lignotubers  with  no  regeneration  occurring  from 

seed following a fire in 2004. 

 

The susceptibility of Verticordia apecta to the effects of dieback disease caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi is 



unknown, however given the susceptibility of other species in the genus, it should be assumed to be susceptible 

until shown otherwise (Hearn et al. 2006). 

 

Threats 

 

Verticordia apecta is declared as rare flora (DRF) under the Western Australian Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 

in  WA  and  is  ranked  as  Critically  Endangered  (CR)  under  International  Union  for  Conservation  of  Nature 

(IUCN  2001)  criteria  B1ab(ii,v)  due to it  being  known  from  a  single  population  and there  being  a continuing 

decline in the area of occupancy of mature individuals. The species is listed as Critically Endangered under the 

Environment  Protection  and  Biodiversity  Conservation  Act  1999  (EPBC  Act  1999).  The  main  threats  to  the 

species are: 

 



 



Dieback  disease:  The  susceptibility  of  Verticordia  apecta  to  the  effects  of  dieback  disease  caused  by 

Phytophthora  cinnamomi  is  unknown.  However,  given  the  susceptibility  of  other  species  in  the  genus,  it 

should  be  assumed  to  be  susceptible  until  shown  otherwise  (Hearn  et  al.  2006).  In  relatively  undisturbed 

habitat Phytophthora spreads through root-to-root contact and through free water flow (Shearer and Tippet 

1989). Although it spreads most quickly downhill it is also capable of moving uphill. It also spreads through 

movement of infected soil, usually by vehicles during firebreak and track use.  P. cinnamomi thrives best in 

mild  moist  conditions  such  as  that  produced  by  spring,  autumn  or  summer  rainfall.  This  pathogen  is  a 

potential threat to this species and its habitat. 

 



Inappropriate fire regimes may affect the viability of the population which was burnt in a wildfire in 2004. 

Although  a  large  proportion  of  the  plants  in  the  population  have  resprouted,  it  is  not  known  how  a 

subsequent  fire  will  affect  the  reproductive  capacity  of  the  species,  particularly  given  that  there  is  no 

evidence that the population is producing seed. 

 

Feral pig activity has been noted along Mitchell River, just west of the population, and has the potential to 



harm  the  species  by  disturbing  both  the  plants  and  nearby  soil.  Pigs  may  also  act  as  a  vector  for 

Phytophthora cinnamomi

 



Grazing  by  rabbits  and  kangaroos  may  be  a  threat  if  they  increase  in  numbers,  possibly  following  a 

disturbance  event  such  as  fire.  Soil  disturbance,  weed  invasion  and  the addition of  nutrients are  secondary 

effects of animal movement in the area inhabited by the species. 

 



Weeds are not currently a threat, however as the site is approximately 600m from private property, weeds 

may  become  a  threat  in  the  future.  Weeds  are  likely  to  invade  the  species’  habitat  following  a  significant 

disturbance such as fire or soil disturbance caused by feral pigs. Weeds may also alter grazing pressure and 

fire behaviour in the habitat.  



 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

7

 



 

Small population size and limited range of this species leaves it highly vulnerable to a single threat event 

such as dieback or pigs which has the potential to impact on all plants within the one known population. The 

limited number of plants of the species would also suggest limited genetic diversity which may impact on the 

long term survival of the species. 

 



Poor recruitment is a threat to the species due to a reduction of factors in the habitat which may positively 

influence  reproduction  as  well  as  an  increase  in  factors  (grazing)  which  may  negatively  influence 

reproduction. 

 



Competition from a local species Gastrolobium coriaceum is a potential threat to the species. The Nemcia is 

a small shrub which grows over the top of the existing  Verticordia stems, thereby burying the plants. This 

may be suppressing growth of the Verticordia

 

The  intent  of  this  plan  is  to  provide  actions  that  will  deal  with  immediate  threats  to  Verticordia  apecta



Although  climate  change  and  drought  may  have  a  long-term  effect  on  the  species,  actions  taken  directly  to 

prevent the impact of climate change and drought are beyond the scope of this plan. 

 

Table 2: Summary of population information and threats 

 

Pop. No. & Location 



Land Status 

Year / No. of plants 

Condition 

Threats 

1. SW Mt Barker 

National Park 

1993 

1994 


1999 

2005 


2006 

2008 


2010 

30 


14 


12 

10 


16 

22 [2 dead] 

Healthy 

Dieback disease, fire, feral pig 

activity, grazing, weeds, small 

population size, poor recruitment, 

competition 

Populations in bold text are considered to be Important Populations. 

 

Guide for decision-makers 

 

Section 1 provides details of current and possible future threats. Actions for development and/or land clearing in 

the immediate vicinity of Verticordia apecta may require assessment. 

 

Actions that could result in any of the following may potentially result in a significant impact on the species: 



 

Damage or destruction of occupied or potential habitat 



 

Alteration of the local surface hydrology or drainage 



 

Reduction in population size 



 

A major increase in disturbance in the vicinity of a population 



 

Spread or amplification of dieback disease. 



 

Habitat critical to the survival of the species, and important populations 

 

Verticordia  apecta  is  ranked  in  WA  as  CR,  and  as  such  it  is  considered  that  all  known  habitat  for  the  wild 

population  is  critical  to  the  survival  of  the  species  and  that  the  wild  population  is  an  important  population. 

Habitat  critical  to  the  survival  of  V.  apecta includes the  area  of  occupancy  of the  population,  areas  of similar 

habitat  surrounding  the  population  (these  providing  potential  habitat  for  population  expansion  and  for 

pollinators), additional occurrences of similar habitat that may contain undiscovered populations of the species 

or  be  suitable  for  future  translocations,  and  the  local  catchment  for  the  surface  and/or  groundwater  that 

maintains the habitat of the species. 

 

Benefits to other species or ecological communities 



 

Recovery actions implemented to improve the quality or security of the habitat of  Verticordia apecta will also 

improve the status of associated native vegetation. The species occurs in association with three Priority species 

which are listed in the table below: 

 

Table 3: Conservation-listed flora species occurring in habitat of Verticordia apecta 


 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

8

 



 

Species name 

Conservation Status (WA) 

Conservation Status (EPBC Act) 

Carex tereticaulis 

Priority 1 



Verticordia endlicheriana var. angustifolia 

Priority 3 



Pleurophascum occidentale 

Priority 4 

For a description of the Priority categories see Smith (2010). 



 

International obligations 

 

This  plan  is  fully  consistent  with  the  aims  and  recommendations  of  the  Convention  on  Biological  Diversity, 



ratified  by  Australia  in  June  1993,  and  will  assist  in  implementing  Australia’s  responsibilities  under  that 

Convention.  The  species  is  not  listed  under  Appendix  II  in  the  United  Nations  Environment  Program  World 

Conservation  Monitoring  Centre  (UNEP-WCMC)  Convention  on  International  Trade  in  Endangered  Species 

(CITES), and this plan does not affect Australia’s obligations under any other international agreements. 

 

Indigenous consultation 

 

A  search  of  the  Department  of  Indigenous  Affairs  Aboriginal  Heritage  Sites  Register  revealed  no  sites  of 



Aboriginal significance adjacent to the population of Verticordia apecta. Input and involvement is being sought 

through the South West Aboriginal Land and Sea Council (SWALSC) and Department of Indigenous Affairs to 

determine  if  there  are  any  issues  or  interests.  Indigenous  opportunity  for  future  involvement  in  the 

implementation of the Recovery plan is included as an action in the plan. 

 

Social and economic impacts 

 

The  implementation  of  this  recovery  plan  may  cause  some  economic  impact  to  DEC  through  the  cost  of 



implementing  recovery  actions.  Also,  as  the  population  is  located  near  private  property,  its  conservation  may 

potentially affect activities on that land.

 

 

 



Affected interests 

 

The known population is on Crown land vested in the Conservation Commission and managed by DEC. 



 

Evaluation of the plan’s performance 

 

DEC, with assistance from the Warren Region Threatened Flora Recovery Team (WRTFRT), will evaluate the 



performance  of  this  plan.  In  addition  to  annual  reporting  on  progress  and  evaluation  against  the  criteria  for 

success and failure, the plan will be reviewed following four years of implementation. 

 

2. 

RECOVERY OBJECTIVE AND CRITERIA 

 

Objective 



 

The objective of this plan is to abate identified threats and maintain or enhance populations to ensure the long-

term preservation of the species in the wild. 

 

Criteria  for  success:  The  number  of  populations  has  increased  and/or  the  number  of  mature  individuals  has 

increased by 20 per cent or more over the term of the plan. 

 

Criteria  for  failure:  The  number  of  populations  has  decreased  and/or  the  number  of  mature  individuals  has 

decreased by 20 per cent or more over the term of the plan. 

 

3. 



RECOVERY ACTIONS 

 

Existing recovery actions 

 


 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

9

 



Cuttings were collected in 2000 and 2005 by DEC Frankland District staff for propagation trials by staff from 

Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority (BGPA). Twenty two plants were propagated but only nine remain alive 

(Table 4). 

 

Table  4:  BGPA  Verticordia  apecta  propagation  trial  results  for  material  collected  by  DEC  Frankland 



District staff in 2000 and 2005 

 

Accession 

No. 

Plants 

Collection info 

Propagation 

information 

Comments 

20000040 

Cuttings, collected 10 Jan 



2000. Clone 1 

33% cuttings, 71% 

grafted 

The four plants are grafted and 

currently recorded as being in the 

Conservation Garden within the 

Botanic Gardens 

20051346 

Plant 1, collected 23 Nov 



2005 

28% from cuttings 

Plants held in container collection in 

nursery 


20051350 

Plant 4, collected 23 Nov 



2005 

43% from cuttings 

Plants held in container collection in 

nursery 


20051352 

Plant 10, collected 23 Nov 



2005 

67% from cuttings 

Plants held in container collection in 

nursery 


20051354 

Plant 7, collected 23 Nov 



2005 

67% from cuttings 

Plants held in container collection in 

nursery 


Note: A number of other clones were propagated in 2000 and 2005 but the plants listed above are the only ones still alive. 

 

Potential habitat has been surveyed by field staff from DEC’s Frankland District, Warren Region and Science 



Division.  Suitable  habitat was  searched  throughout the  District  for  a  number  of  species  by  Roger  Hearn, Ray 

Cranfield, Tony Annells, Edward Middelton and Brenda Hammersley in 1993-1997 with no new populations of 



Verticordia apecta located. Additional areas were searched in Roe forest block in 2002 by T. Middelton and D. 

Coffey. This area has similar granite habitat, and species assemblages, however, no populations were located. 

 

A fire response plan has been developed by Frankland District to be used in the event of further wildfires in the 



area (Appendix A). It briefly outlines hygiene practices and water use in the event of a wildfire to prevent the 

chances  of  Phytophthora  cinnamomi  infection.  It  also  makes  recommendations  regarding  vehicle  damage  to 

flora on the outcrop.  

 

Genetic  material  was  collected  from  Verticordia  habrantha,  V.  endlicheriana  var.  angustifolia  and  V.  apecta 



and sent to DEC Science Division to investigate the potential of the species being a hybrid.

 

 



Staff from DEC’s Frankland District regularly monitor the population of the taxon. 

 

The  WRTFRT  is  assisting  DEC  to  coordinate  recovery  actions  for  Verticordia  apecta  along  with  other 



threatened  species  in  the  Region.  Information  on  progress  in  implementing  recovery  actions  will  be  reported 

through annual reports to DEC's Corporate Executive and funding bodies. 



 

Future recovery actions 

 

If populations of Verticordia apecta are found on lands other than those managed by DEC, permission will be 



sought  from  appropriate  owners/land  managers  prior  to  recovery  actions  being  undertaken.  The  following 

recovery  actions  are  generally  in  order  of  descending  priority,  influenced  by  their  timing  over  the  life  of  the 

plan.  However  this  should  not  constrain  addressing  any  of  the  actions  if  funding  is  available  and  other 

opportunities arise. 

 

1. 

Coordinate recovery actions 

 

The  WRTFRT  will  assist  DEC  in  coordinating  recovery  actions  for  Verticordia  apecta  along  with  other 



threatened species. Information on progress in implementing recovery actions will be reported through annual 

reports to DEC’s Corporate Executive and funding bodies. 

 

Action: 

Coordinate recovery actions 



 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

10

 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Frankland District) with assistance from the WRTFRT 



Cost: 

$6,000 per year 



2. 

Confirm species through genetic analysis 

 

There is some uncertainty regarding the status of Verticordia apecta due to intermediate morphological features 



and  its  apparent  inability  to  reproduce.  Investigations  so  far  suggest  its  potential  as  a  hybrid  between  V. 

habranthaV. endlicheriana var. angustifolia and V. apecta is unlikely unless another parent plant can be found. 

Further  genetic  analysis  is  also  required  to  investigate  if  all  stems  arise  from  a  common  lignotuber  and  its 

potential as a clone. 

 

Action: 

Confirm species through genetic analysis 

Responsibility: 

DEC (Frankland District, Science Division) 



Cost: 

$10,000 in year 1 



 

3. 

Collect and hold propagation material 

 

Preservation of genetic material is essential to guard against extinction of the species if the wild population is 



lost. It is recommended that seed be collected and stored by TFSC and cutting material obtained for propagation 

at the BGPA. 

 

Action: 

Collect and hold propagation material 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Frankland District and TFSC) and BGPA 



Cost:  

$5,000 per year 

 

4. 

Monitor population 

 

Monitoring  of  factors  such  as  grazing,  weed  invasion,  habitat  degradation,  hydrology,  population  stability 



(expansion or decline), pollinator activity, seed production, recruitment, and longevity is essential. In addition, 

competition from Gastrolobium coriaceum will be monitored and if needed, pruning undertaken. 

 

Feral pig activity has been observed to the west of the population and needs to be monitored to ensure it does 



not occur at the Verticordia apecta population. Fencing of the population may need to be considered. 

 

Action: 

Monitor population 

Responsibility: 

DEC (Frankland District) with assistance from the WRTFRT 



Cost: 

$5,000 per year

 

 

5.  

Obtain biological and ecological information 

 

Increased knowledge of the biology and ecology of the species will provide a scientific basis for management of 



Verticordia apecta in the wild. Overall investigations will ideally include: 

 

1.



 

Study  of  the  soil  seed  bank  dynamics  and  the  role  of  various  factors  including  disturbance,  competition, 

drought, inundation and grazing in recruitment and seedling survival. 

2.

 



Determination of reproductive strategies, phenology and seasonal growth. 

3.

 



Investigation of reproductive success and pollination biology. 

4.

 



Investigation of minimum viable population size. 

5.

 



The impact of changes in hydrology in the habitat. 

 

Action: 

Obtain biological and ecological information 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Science Division, Frankland District) 



Cost: 

$10,000 per year 



 

6. 

Determine Phytophthora cinnamomi susceptibility 

 

The susceptibility of Verticordia apecta to Phytophthora cinnamomi is not known. Root and soil samples will 



be taken from any plants that are found to be recently dead in suspect areas. Significant fronts will be mapped 

 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

11

 



and monitored in the vicinity of critical habitat. Aerial phosphite application may be used to target high priority 

areas and reduce the spread of P. cinnamomi into currently uninfected areas. 

 

Action

Determine Phytophthora cinnamomi susceptibility 



Responsibility

DEC (Frankland District) 



Cost

$2,000 in year 1 

 

7. 

Map and monitor dieback fronts 

 

The  Phytophthora  cinnamomi  status  of  the  surrounding  landscape  is  undetermined  but  it  is  likely  there  is  P. 



cinnamomi nearby. Determine and map the P. cinnamomi status of the surrounding local landscape and identify 

likely points of transmission into the population. After the  P. cinnamomi status has been mapped, continue to 

monitor the development of fronts and any new infections. 

 

Action: 

Map and monitor dieback fronts 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Frankland District) 



Cost: 

$5,000 in year 1, $3,000 per year in years 2-5 



 

8.  

Maintain disease hygiene 

 

Dieback hygiene (outlined in CALM 2003 (now DEC)) will be followed for activities such as installation and 



maintenance  of  firebreaks  and  walking  into  the  population  in  wet  soil  conditions.  If  Verticordia  apecta  is 

susceptible, a dieback response plan will be prepared to prevent infection within the critical habitat and manage 

any  outbreaks.  This  may  include  installing  purpose  built  signs  advising  of  the  dieback  risk  and  high 

conservation values of the sites. 



 

Action: 

Maintain disease hygiene 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Frankland District) 



Cost: 

$2,000 per year 

 

9. 

Undertake regeneration trials 

 

Natural disturbance events (physical or fire) may be the most effective means of germinating Verticordia apecta 



in the wild. Different disturbance techniques should be investigated (i.e. soil disturbance and fire), to determine 

the most successful and appropriate method. As well as the known population site, trials will also be carried out 

at historical locations. Records will need to be maintained for future research. Any disturbance trials will need 

to be undertaken in conjunction with weed control. 

 

Action: 

Undertake regeneration trials 



Responsibility:  

DEC (Science Division and Frankland District) 



Cost:  

$7,000 in years 1 and 3, $2,000 in years 2, 4 and 5 

 

10. 

Undertake surveys 

 

The species has been thoroughly surveyed in the past with likely habitat looked at. However, if additional areas 



of  suitable  habitat  are  found,  it  is  recommended  that  these  areas  be  surveyed  for  the  presence  of  Verticordia 

apecta. All surveyed areas will be recorded and the presence or absence of the species documented to increase 

survey  efficiency  and  reduce  unnecessary  duplicate  surveys.  Where  possible,  volunteers  from  the  local 

community, Landcare groups, wildflower societies and naturalists clubs will be encouraged to become involved. 

 

Action

Undertake surveys 

Responsibility

DEC (Frankland District) with assistance from the WRTFRT 



Cost

$5,000 per year 

 

11. 

Implement fire response plan 

 


 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

12

 



A  fire  response  plan  developed  by  Frankland  District  (Appendix  A)  will  be  implemented.  The  plan  briefly 

outlines  hygiene  practices  and  water  use  in  the  event  of  a  wildfire  to  prevent  the  chances  of  Phytophthora 



cinnamomi infection. It also makes recommendations regarding vehicle damage to flora on the outcrop. 

 

Action

Implement fire response plan 

Responsibility: 

DEC (Frankland District) 



Cost: 

$2,000 per year 

 

12. 

Develop and implement a translocation proposal 

 

Translocation  may  be  deemed  desirable  for  the  conservation  of  this  species.  A  translocation  proposal  will  be 



developed,  suitable  translocation  sites  selected  and  the  translocation  implemented.  Information  on  the 

translocation  of  threatened  plants  and  animals  in  the  wild  is  provided  in  DEC's  Policy  Statement  No.  29 



Translocation  of  Threatened  Flora  and  Fauna  (CALM  1995),  and  the  Australian  Network  for  Plant 

Conservation translocation guidelines (Vallee  et al. 2004). All translocation proposals require endorsement by 

DEC’s Director of Nature Conservation. Monitoring of translocations is essential and will be included in the 

timetable developed for the Translocation Proposal. 

 

Action: 

Develop and implement a translocation proposal 



Responsibility: 

DEC (Science Division and Frankland District) 



Cost:  

$10,000 in years 1 and 2; and $5,000 in subsequent years 

 

13. 

Promote awareness 

 

The importance of biodiversity conservation and the protection of  Verticordia apecta will be promoted to the 



public. This  will  be achieved  through  an information campaign  using  local  print  and  electronic  media  and by 

setting  up  poster  displays.  An  information  sheet,  which  includes  a  description  of  the  plant,  its  habitat  type, 

threats, management actions and photos will be produced. These will be distributed to the public through DEC’s 

Frankland District office and at the offices and libraries of the Shire of Denmark. Such information distribution 

may  lead  to  the  discovery  of  new  populations.  Formal  links  with  local  naturalist  groups  and  interested 

individuals will also be encouraged. 

 

Action: 

Promote awareness 



Responsibility: 

DEC  (Frankland  District,  SCB  and  Corporate  Relations)  with  assistance  from  the 

WRTFRT 

Cost: 

$4,000 in year 1 and $2,000 in years 2-5 

 

14. 

Map habitat critical to the survival of Verticordia apecta 

 

Although habitat critical to the survival of the species is alluded to in Section 1, it has not yet been mapped and 



this  will  be  addressed  under  this  action.  If  additional  populations  are  located,  then  habitat  critical  to  their 

survival will also be determined and mapped. 

 

Action

Map habitat critical to the survival of Verticordia apecta 



Responsibility

DEC (SCB and Frankland District) 



Cost

$6,000 in year 2 

 

15. 

Liaise with Indigenous groups 

 

Indigenous consultation will take place to determine if there are any issues or interests in areas that are habitat 



for the species. 

 

Action: 

Liaise with Indigenous groups 

Responsibility: 

DEC (Frankland District) 



Cost: 

$2,000 per year 

 

16. 

Review this plan and assess the need for further recovery actions 


 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

13

 



 

If Verticordia apecta is still ranked CR at the end of the five-year term of this plan, the need for further recovery 

actions, or a review of this plan will be assessed and a revised plan prepared if necessary. 

 

Action: 

Review this plan and assess the need for further recovery actions 

Responsibility: 

DEC (SCB and Frankland District) with assistance from the WRTFRT 



Cost:  

$3,000 in year 5 



 

Table 5. Summary of recovery actions 

 

Recovery Actions 



Priority 

Responsibility 

Completion date 

Coordinate recovery actions 

High 

DEC (Frankland District) with assistance from 



the WRTFRT 

Ongoing 


Confirm species through 

genetic analysis 

High 

DEC (Frankland District and Science Division) 



2013 

Collect and hold propagation 

material 

High 


DEC (Frankland District and TFSC) and BGPA 

2017 


Monitor population 

High 


DEC (Frankland District) with assistance from 

the WRTFRT 

Ongoing 

Obtain biological and 

ecological information  

High 


DEC (Science Division and Frankland District) 

2017 


Determine Phytophthora 

cinnamomi susceptibility 

High 


DEC (Frankland District) 

2013 


Map and monitor dieback 

fronts 


High 

DEC (Frankland District) 

2017 

Maintain disease hygiene 



High 

DEC (Frankland District) 

Ongoing 

Undertake regeneration trials 

High 

DEC (Science Division and Frankland District) 



2017 

Undertake surveys 

High 

DEC (Frankland District) with assistance from 



the WRTFRT 

Ongoing 


Implement fire response plan 

High 


DEC (Frankland District) 

Ongoing 


Develop and implement a 

translocation proposal 

High 

DEC (Science Division and Frankland District) 



2017 

Promote awareness 

Medium 

(Frankland District, SCB and Corporate 



Relations) with assistance from the WRTFRT 

Ongoing 


Map habitat critical to the 

survival of Verticordia apecta 

Medium 

DEC (SCB and Frankland District) 



2014 

Liaise with Indigenous groups 

Medium 

DEC (Frankland District) 



Ongoing 

Review this plan and assess 

the need for further recovery 

actions 


Medium 

DEC (SCB and Frankland District) with 

assistance from the WRTFRT 

2017 


 

4. 

TERM OF PLAN 

 

This plan will operate from March 2012 to February 2017 but will remain in force until withdrawn or replaced. 



If the species is still ranked CR after five years, the need for further recovery actions will be determined. 

 

5. 

REFERENCES 

 

Department  of  Conservation  and  Land  Management  (1992)  Policy  Statement  No.  44  Wildlife  Management 



Programs. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth, Western Australia. 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1994) Policy Statement No. 50  Setting Priorities for the 



Conservation  of  Western  Australia’s  Threatened  Flora  and  Fauna.  Department  of  Environment  and 

Conservation, Perth, Western Australia. 

Department  of  Conservation  and  Land  Management  (1995)  Policy  Statement  No.  29  Translocation  of 

Threatened Flora and Fauna Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth. 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (2003)  Phytophthora cinnamomi and disease caused by it 

Volume  1  –  Management  Guidelines.  Department  of  Conservation  and  Land  Management  (now  DEC), 

Perth, Western Australia. 



 

Interim Recovery Plan for Verticordia apecta 

 

14

 



George, E. A. and George, A. S. (1994)  New Taxa of Verticordia (Myrtaceae: Chamelaucieae) from Western 

Australia. Nuytsia 9 (3): 33-341. 

George, E. A. (2002)  Verticordia: the turner of hearts. University of Western Australia Press, Perth, Western 

Australia. 

Government of Australia (1999) Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act. 

Hearn  R.W.,  Meissner  R.,  Brown  A.P.,  Macfarlane  T.D.,  and  Annels  T.R.  (2006)  Declared  Rare  and  Poorly 



Known  Flora  in  the  Warren  Region.  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation,  Perth,  Western 

Australia. 

International Union for Conservation of Nature (2001) IUCN Red List Categories: Version 3.1. Prepared by the 

IUCN Species Survival Commission. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. 

Shearer B. and Tippet J. (1989) Jarrah Dieback: The Dynamics and Management of Phytophthora cinnamomi in 

the Jarrah (Eucalyptus   arginate) Forest of South-western Australia. Research Bulletin No.3. Department 

of Conservation and Land Management. 

Smith, M. (2010) Declared Rare and Priority Flora List for Western Australia. Department of Environment and 

Conservation, Perth, Western Australia. 

Vallee,  L.,  Hogbin  T.,  Monks  L.,  Makinson  B.,  Matthes  M.  and  Rossetto  M.  (2004)  Guidelines  for  the 

Translocation  of  Threatened  Australian  Plants.  Second  Edition.  The  Australian  Network  for  Plant 



Conservation. Canberra, Australia. 

Western  Australian  Herbarium  (1998−)  FloraBase  –  The  Western  Australian  Flora.  Department  of 

Environment and Conservation. http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/. 

 

6. 



TAXONOMIC DESCRIPTION 

 

Excerpt from: George, E. A. and George, A. S. (1994) New Taxa of Verticordia (Myrtaceae: Chamelaucieae) from Western 



Australia. Nuytsia 9 (3): 33-341. 

 

Verticordia apecta 

 

A slender, erect shrub with 1 stem to 45 cm tall, ?with lignotuber. Lower leaves linear, triquetrous, obtuse, often minutely 



mucronate, 3-9 mm long; stem leaves narrowly elliptic, obtuse but minutely mucronate, c. 7 mm long; floral leaves elliptic, 

to  obovate,  triquetrous,  obtuse.  Flowers  few,  in  upper  axils.  Peduncles  9-19  mm  long,  ascending,  thickened  upwards. 



Bracteoles  not  cuspidate.  Hypanthium  broadly  turbinate,  1.5  mm  long,  10-ribbed,  shortly  and  finely  pubescent;  top  of 

hypanthium  finely  pitted.  Sepals  deep  pink  including  main  lobes,  the  finer  fringe  segments  white,  widely  spreading  but 

main lobes upturned, 4 mm long overall; lamina semi-elliptic, c. 1 mm long, 2 mm wide; fringe finely scabrid; auricles on 

broad claw, the upturned lamina semi-orbicular, deeply fimbriate, exceeding hypanthium. Petals deep pink, the finer fringe 

lobes white, 4 mm long overall, spreading with upturned fringe; lamina transversely semi-orbicular, deeply lacerate with 4-

6  main  lobes  and  many  smaller  ones;  lamina  1  mm  long,  1.8  mm  wide.  Stamens  and  staminodes  united  for  c.  0.5  mm; 

stamens  0.8-1  mm  long,  glabrous;  anthers  0.5-0.7  mm  long,  strongly  incurved,  depressed-globular  with  lateral  shallow 

vertical  grooves,  and  with  small  obtuse  umbonate  apical  appendage;  staminodes  3.5  mm  long,  irregularly  lacerate, 

otherwise glabrous. Style erect, 0.3 mm long, with short hairs around stigma; stigma slightly enlarged.  Ovules 2, laterally 

attached at base of ovary. 

 

Habitat  and  Distribution:  Known  only  from  the  type  locality.  Grows  in  sandy  clay  with  loam  and  broken  granite,  on  an 

upper west-facing slope in Eucalyptus wandoo low open woodland and low open shrubland. 

 

Flowering Period: November. 

 

 



Kataloq: images -> documents -> plants-animals -> threatened-species -> recovery plans -> Approved interim recovery plans
Approved interim recovery plans -> White featherflower
Approved interim recovery plans -> Southern shy featherflower
Approved interim recovery plans -> Interim recovery plan
Approved interim recovery plans -> Scaly-leaved featherflower
Approved interim recovery plans -> Pine featherflower (verticordia staminosa subsp. Cylindracea var. Erecta)
Approved interim recovery plans -> Wongan featherflower
Approved interim recovery plans -> Plant assemblages of the Billeranga System Interim Recovery Plan
Approved interim recovery plans -> Clay pans of the Swan Coastal Plain
Approved interim recovery plans -> Phalanx grevillea
Approved interim recovery plans -> Interim Recovery Plan 2014–2019 Department of Parks and Wildlife, Western Australia

Yüklə 446,49 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə