Warriedar p



Yüklə 9,02 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix03.09.2017
ölçüsü9,02 Mb.
  1   2   3

YA

LG

OO



 - N

IN

GH



AN

 RD


BOONER

ONG RD


WARRIEDAR - P

ERENJORI RD

W

AR

RI



ED

AR

 C



OP

PE



M

IN

E R



D

482000


484000

486000


488000

490000


492000

494000


496000

498000


500000

502000


504000

506000


508000

510000


512000

67

52



00

0

67



54

00

0



67

56

00



0

67

58



00

0

67



60

00

0



67

62

00



0

67

64



00

0

67



66

00

0



67

68

00



0

67

70



00

0

67



72

00

0



67

74

00



0

67

76



00

0

67



78

00

0



67

80

00



0

67

82



00

0

67



84

00

0



67

86

00



0

67

88



00

0

67



90

00

0



67

92

00



0

Main road

Warriedar pastoral lease

Tenements

Document Name: 20170125_TUN_Fig1-1_Biol Report

O

\\M


AIN

SE

RV



ER

-PC


\se

rve


r st

ora


ge

\A

PM



 G

IS a


nd

 M

ap



pin

g\0


3_

Clie


nt\

TU

N\0



2_

GIS


 M

ap

s\2



01

70

12



5_

TU

N_



Fig

1-1


_B

iol 


Re

po

rt.m



xd

1:120,000

ems@animalplantmineral.com.au / (08) 6296 5155

Figure 1-1: Mt Mulgine Project Location Plan

L e g e n d

L e g e n d

^

_



0

210


420

630


840

105


Kilometers

Perth

L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 3 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

1.2

 

S

COPE OF 

W

ORK

 

Animal Plant Mineral Pty Ltd (APM) was engaged by TGN to design and execute vegetation and fauna surveys 

to  facilitate approval  of the Mt  Mulgine Project. The scope  included a  Level 2 vegetation survey and Level  1 

fauna survey. The time of the survey was not optimal for annual flora and, though collections of annual flora 

were made, the focus of the current survey was on the mapping of vegetation of the Project area. Additional 

survey work is proposed following significant rainfall in 2017. 

The methodology for the biological survey was determined by Principal Ecologist Dr Mitchell Ladyman and the 

survey scope was then ratified through liaison with the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW). 

 

 


L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 4 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

1.3

 

B

ACKGROUND AND 

S

UPPORTING 

I

NFORMATION

 

Species  considered  to  be  of  national  conservation  significance  are  protected  under  the  Environmental 



Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act 1999). Under this Act, activities that may have a 

significant  impact  on  a  species  of  national  conservation  significance  must  be  referred  to  the  Department  of 

Environment (DoE) for assessment. In WA, all native flora and fauna species are protected under the Wildlife 

Conservation Act 1950 (WC Act). Flora and Fauna species that are considered rare, threatened with extinction 

or  have  high  conservation  value  are  specially  protected  by  four  schedules  in  this  Act  (see  Appendix  1).  The 

DPaW  also  classifies  some  flora  under  four  different  Priority  codes  and  fauna  under  five  different  Priority 

codes (Appendix 1). 

Some  species  of  fauna  are  covered  under  the  1991  Australian  and  New  Zealand  Environment  Conservation 

Council (ANZECC) Convention (Commonwealth(Cth)), while certain birds are listed under the  1974 Japan and 

Australian  Migratory  Bird  Agreement  (JAMBA)  (Cth)  and  the  1986  China  and  Australian  Migratory  Bird 

Agreement  (CAMBA)  (Cth).  More  recently  Australia  and  the  Republic  of  Korea  agreed  to  develop  a  bilateral 

migratory bird agreement similar to the JAMBA and CAMBA. The Republic of Korea-Australian Migratory Bird 

Agreement  (ROKAMBA)  was  entered  into  force  in  2007.  All  migratory  bird  species  listed  in  the  annexes  to 

these  bilateral  agreements  are  protected  in  Australia  as  Matters  of  National  Environmental  Significance 

(MNES) under the EPBC Act 1999. 

 

1.4

 

E

XISTING 

E

NVIRONMENT

 

The Project lies within the Shire of Perenjori. Land use in the area is predominantly pastoralism, in particular 

grazing. The Project tenements are partially located within the former Warriedar pastoral station, which is now 

managed  by  the  DPaW.  Some  conservation  areas  are  present  in  the  broader  region,  along  with  unallocated 

crown land and crown reserves (Desmond and Chant, 2001). The Project area contains no registered Aboriginal 

heritage places and two ‘other heritage places’. Ethnographic sites and isolated artefacts have been identified 

within the Project tenements. No European heritage places are within the Project area. 

1.4.1

 

Climate 

The Project is located within the bioregion Murchison of WA on the Yilgarn craton, which is characterised by  

hot dry summers and cold winters.  

The  nearest  Bureau  of  Meteorology  (BoM)  weather  station  is  at  Paynes  Find  (BoM  Site  Number:  007139), 

approximately 70 km east of the Project area. The Paynes Find station has been recording rainfall since 1919 

and temperature since 1975. Average monthly and annual rainfall and temperature are presented in Table 1-1. 

Recorded data  suggests that the  Project area is likely to receive close to 289 millimetres (mm) of rain on an 

annual  basis  and  experience  temperatures  ranging  between  5.5  degrees  Celsius  (°C)  and  37.3°C  (the  lowest 

and highest monthly averages recorded) (BoM, 2016a). January is the hottest month with  a mean maximum 

temperature  of  37.3  °C  and  mean  minimum  of  21°C.  July  is  the  coolest  month  with  a  mean  maximum 

temperature of 18.5 °C and mean minimum of 5.5°C (BoM, 2016a) (Table 1-1). Figure 1-2 illustrates the Project 

area is subject to climate typical of the region, with hot summers and wet winters. 

 


L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 5 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

Table 1-1: Rainfall and temperature averages for Paynes Find Weather Station (007139) 

 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Jul 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

Mean 

Rainfall 

(mm) 

19.8 


23.4 

25.5 


26.1 

37.3 


41.0 

35.4 


27.0 

14.3 


10.5 

10.8 


12.6 

Mean  Max 

Temp (



C) 

37.3 

36.5 


32.9 

28.4 


23.1 

19.3 


18.5 

20.1 


23.8 

27.8 


31.7 

35.0 


Mean 

Min 

Temp (



C) 

21.0 

21.2 


18.1 

14.3 


9.5 

6.7 


5.5 

6.0 


8.0 

11.5 


15.4 

18.4 


Source: BoM, 2016a 

 

 



Figure 1-2: Paynes Find Weather Station Meteorological Data (BoM, 2016a) 

 

1.4.2



 

Biogeographic Regionalisation 

The Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia

 (

IBRA) (version 7.1) classifies the Australian continent 



into regions (bioregions) of similar geology, landform, vegetation, fauna and climate characteristics (Thackway 

and Cresswell, 1995). The mapping completed by Beard (1975) provides the basis for the IBRA bioregions. IBRA 

mapping (Version 7.1), places the Project within the Yalgoo Bioregion. 

The Yalgoo Bioregion is characterised by low woodlands to open woodlands of Eucalyptus, Acacia and Callitris 

on red sandy plains of the Western Yilgarn Craton and southern Carnarvon Basin. Mulga,  Callitris,-E. salubris, 

and Bowgada open woodlands and scrubs occur on earth to sandy-earth plains in the western Yilgarn Craton.  

The Yalgoo Bioregion is further subdivided into the Edel (YAL01) and Tallering (YAL02) sub-regions. The Project 

lies entirely within the Tallering sub-region, one of the few sub-regions not previously described by IBRA. 

0

5

10



15

20

25



30

35

40



0

5

10



15

20

25



30

35

40



45

Tem

p

e

ratu

re

 (



C)



 

R

ai

n

fal

l (m

m

Mean Rainfall (mm)

Mean Min Temp (°C)

Mean Max Temp (°C)



L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 6 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

1.4.3

 

Land Systems 

The  land  system  approach  to  the  management  of  rangelands  results  from  the  identification  of  recurring 

patterns of topography, soil and vegetation and involves their use in land use and catchment planning. Four 

land systems have been mapped within the Project area by Payne et al. (1998): 

Graves: 

Basalt  and  greenstone  rises  and  low  hills,  supporting  eucalypt  woodlands  with  prominent 

saltbush and bluebush understoreys. 

Moriarty: 

Low  greenstone  rises  and  stony  plains  supporting  halophytic  and  acacia  shrublands  with 

patchy eucalypt overstorys. 

Norie:   

Granite hills with exfoliating domes and extensive tor fields supporting acacia shrublands. 

Singleton: 

Rugged greenstone ranges with dense casuarina and acacia shrublands. 



1.4.4

 

Surface Water 

The  Project  area  is  located  within  the  greater  Yara  Monger  catchment.  Some  drainage  flows  to  the  west 

although  drainage  the  Project  area  flows  in  an  easterly  direction  towards  Monger’s  Lake  chain  (Soil  Water 

Consultants, 2012). On a local scale, surface water generally flows west and north east from Mt Mulgine into 

broader southern and eastern drainage paths respectively. Incised flow channels are common and the steeper 

terrain results in less potential for flooding (Soil Water Consultants, 2012). 



1.4.5

 

Wetlands 

The  Project  area  does  not  include  and  is  not  in  close  proximity  to  any  wetlands  listed  as  Ramsar  sites 

(Landgate, 2016). 

1.4.6

 

Previous Surveys 

Much  of  the  Mt  Mulgine  area  has  previously  been  surveyed  to  facilitate  the  expansion  of  mining  by  Minjar 

Gold. Vegetation surveys have been undertaken by Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd (Woodman) 

(2003 and 2007), APM (2011, 2012) and Terratree Pty Ltd (Terratree) (2013). A fauna survey of the area was 

also undertaken by APM in 2012. 

A summary of the surveys previously undertaken is provided in Table 1-2 below. 

 

 


L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 7 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

Table 1-2: Existing surveys of the Mt Mulgine Project Area 

Aspect 

Report Title 

Consultant 

Year 

Purpose 

Flora and Vegetation 

Vegetation  Survey  of 

the  Highland  Chief  and 

Monaco  Areas,  Minjar 

Gold Project. 

Woodman 


2003 

Flora  and  vegetation 

survey 

for 


the 

expansion  of  mining 

operations. 

Minjar  Gold  Project. 

Camp, 

Trench 


and 

Bobby McGee Prospects 

Proposed 

Reverse 


Circulation  (RC)  Drilling. 

Flora  and  Vegetation 

Assessment. 

Woodman 


2007 

Flora  and  vegetation 

survey  for  exploration 

activity. 

Minjar  Gold  Biological 

Survey. 


Minjar  Gold 

Mine  Expansion.  Flora 

and 

Vegetation 



Assessment. 

APM 


2011 

Flora  and  vegetation 

survey 

for 


the 

expansion of mining. 

Level 



Flora 



and 

Vegetation  Assessment 

and Targeted Search for 

Flora  of  Conservation 

Significance. 

Austin, 


Blackdog, 

Camp, 


Highland 

Chief, 


Keronima,  Mugs  Luck, 

Riley and Trench. 

APM 

2012 


Flora  and  vegetation 

survey 


for 

the 


construction 

of 


expansion projects. 

Level  1  and  2  Flora  and 

Vegetation  Survey  and 

Mapping 


Potential 

Habitat 


for 

the 


Threatened 

(Declared 

Rare)  species  Stylidium 

scintillans 

Terratree 

2013 

Flora  and  vegetation 



survey  and  habitat 

mapping  for  Stylidium 



scintillans. 

Terrestrial Fauna 

Fauna 


Assessment. 

Austin,  Blackdog,  Bobby 

McGee,  Bugeye,  Camp, 

Highland 

Chief, 

Keronima,  M1,  Monaco, 



Mugs 

Luck, 


Riley, 

Silverstone,  Trench  and 

Windinne Well Projects. 

APM 


2012 

Biological  assessment 

surveys 

for 


the 

construction 

of 

expansion projects. 



 

 

 



L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 8 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

2

 

METHOLOGY 

2.1

 

C

ONTRIBUTING 

A

UTHORS

 

The Project survey scope was designed by APM Principal Biologist Dr Mitch Ladyman. The flora and vegetation 

survey and reporting was refined and executed by APM Senior Botanist James Tsakalos, with assistance from 

Environmental Scientist Loren Kavanagh. The field fauna survey work was executed by Dr Mitch Ladyman and 

Environmental Scientist Sarah Isbister, with the reporting component assimilated by Loren Kavanagh. 

Technical review of the outputs were completed by Dr Mitch Ladyman and James Tsakalos. 

 

2.2

 

D

ESKTOP 

M

ETHODOLOGY

 

2.2.1

 

Database Searches 

A  search  of  the  EPBC  Act  list  of  protected  species  was  undertaken  using  the  Protected  Matters  Search  Tool 

(PMST) (DoE, 2016a) to identify flora, fauna and threatened ecological communities considered to be Matters 

of National Environmental Significance (MNES). This search covered an area within 10 km of the centre of the 

Project area (-29.17 S, 116.96 E). The results of the database search are presented in Appendix 2. 

The NatureMap database (DPaW, 2016) was searched to produce a list of potentially occurring species within 

10 km of the Project area using coordinates (-29.17 S, 116.96 E). This database has the most up to date species 

list based on flora and fauna licence returns from numerous surveys conducted in the area. The results of the 

database search are presented in Appendix 3. 

A  search  of  the  Atlas  of  Living  Australia  (AoLA)  (AoLA,  2016)  was  also  undertaken  to  produce  a  list  of  fauna 

potentially occurring within a 10 km buffer of the Project area using coordinates -29.17 S, 116.96 E. The results 

of the database search are presented in Appendix 4. 

A request was made for a search of the DPaW database for Threatened and Priority flora and fauna and the 

presence  of  Threatened  Ecological  Communities  (TEC)  or  Priority  Ecological  Communities  (PEC).  This  search 

was conducted based on a single point approximately centrally located in the Project area at -29.17 S, 116.96 E 

and included a 10 km buffer for flora, 35 km buffer for fauna and 30 km buffer for ecological communities. The 

results of the flora and fauna database searches are presented in Appendix 5 and Appendix 6 respectively. 

 

2.3



 

F

IELD 

S

URVEY

 

2.3.1

 

Vegetation Survey Methodology 

The vegetation field survey was undertaken from 8 to 12 of November 2016. Field personnel included Botanist 

James  Tsakalos  and  Environmental  Scientist  Loren  Kavanagh.  The  survey  was  designed  in  accordance  with 

Environmental  Protection  Authority  (EPA)  Guidance  Statement  No.  51  (EPA,  2004a)  and  EPA  Position 

Statement  No.  3  (EPA,  2002)  and  was  intended  to  comprise  a  Level  2  survey  with  respect  to  vegetation 

mapping and analysis, with intention of additional survey following mesic conditions to capture annual species 

and targeted rare flora survey.  


L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 9 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

Prior to commencing the fieldwork, aerial photography was used to determine  potential quadrat locations in 

the  Project  area.  Aerial  photos  were  carried  during  fieldwork  to  confirm  boundaries  and  extent  of  plant 

communities and landforms and to assist in refinement of the placement and positioning of quadrats. 

A total of 38 quadrats were established in patches of visually homogenous vegetation types. Each quadrat was 

20 m  by  20 m  as  outlined  in  the  Technical  Guidelines  for  Flora  and  Vegetation  Surveys  for  Environmental 

Impact Assessment (Freeman, Stack, Thomas and Woolfrey, 2015). The following information was collected at 

each quadrat using a standard recording sheet: 

 

Site description/landform; 



 

Slope aspect; 



 

Soil type and colour



 

Surface rock cover



 

Estimation of age since last fire; 



 

Vegetation condition (Keighery, 1994); and 



 

All vascular plant species present, height and foliage cover. 



Plants  with  unknown  or  uncertain  identities  were  collected  and  pressed  on  site.  These  plants  underwent 

formal identification using combination of dichotomous keys, published descriptions, occurrence records and 

were  compared  against  specimens  housed  at  the  Western  Australian  Herbarium  to  ensure  correct 

identification. Table 2-1 below describes the Keighery vegetation condition rating scale. 




Yüklə 9,02 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə