Warriedar p


Table 2-1: Vegetation condition rating scale (adapted from Keighery 1994)



Yüklə 9,02 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/3
tarix03.09.2017
ölçüsü9,02 Mb.
1   2   3

Table 2-1: Vegetation condition rating scale (adapted from Keighery 1994) 

Vegetation Condition 

Description 

E – Excellent 

Pristine or nearly so, no obvious signs of damage caused by 

human activities since European settlement. 

VG – Very Good 

Some relatively slight signs of damage caused by human 

activities since European settlement. For example, some signs 

of damage to tree trunks caused by repeated fire, the presence 

of some relatively non-aggressive weeds, or occasional vehicle 

tracks. 


G – Good 

More obvious signs of damage caused by human activity since 

European settlement, including some obvious impact on the 

vegetation structure such as that caused by low levels of 

grazing or slightly aggressive weeds. 

P – Poor 

Still retains basic vegetation structure or ability to regenerate 

to it after very obvious impacts of human activities since 

European settlement, such as grazing, partial clearing, frequent 

fires or aggressive weeds.  

VP – Very Poor 

Areas that are completely or almost completely without native 

species in the structure of their vegetation; i.e. areas that are 

cleared or ‘parkland cleared’ with their flora comprising weed 

or crop species with isolated native trees or shrubs. 


L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 10 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

D – Completely Degraded 

Areas that are completely or almost completely without native 

species in the structure of their vegetation; i.e. areas that are 

cleared or ‘parkland cleared’ with their flora comprising weed 

or crop species with isolated native trees or shrubs. 

 

As a  tool to assist  in the description of vegetation pattern, environmental data  from  combination of  remote 



sensing and modelling sources was obtained for each quadrat: 

 



Commonwealth  Science  and  Industrial  Research  Organisation  (CSIRO)  Terrestrial  Ecosystem 

Research Network (TERN) soil layers including;  

Total  nitrogen,  total  phosphorus,  available  water  capacity,  coarse  fragments,  bulk 



density, sand content, clay content, silt, pH, depth of regolith, depth of soil and effective 

cation exchange. 

 

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 



digital elevation. 

non-void  filled  SRTM  image  included  where  with  the  use  of  System  for  Automated 



Geoscientific Analyses (SAGA) (Quantum Geographic Information System (QGIS)) various 

indices were calculated including; Slope, aspect and topographic wetness index. 



2.3.1.1

 

Data analyses 

Data analyses involved three steps to screen data, define vegetation pattern and to link potential short term 

ecological drivers. Prior to vegetation analyse data were subject to pre-processing on combination of nearest 

neighbour  distance  in  conjunction  with  inspection  of  releve  data.  The  largest  distance  between  two  releves 

represents the most dissimilar releves. The composition of these releves was then viewed and decision made 

to keep or discard. 



Step 1. Evaluation of classification techniques 

Classification  involves  various  choices  of  data  transformation,  distance  measures  and  clustering  algorithms. 

Each  of  these  are  known  to constrain  the  data  (in  various  ways)  and  to  influence  the  resulting  classification 

scheme  presented.  Much  attention  has  been  drawn  into  the  determination  of  the  optimal  choice  of 

transformation, distance and clustering to determine most robust and ecologically meaningful system of plant 

communities. 

APM  tested  30  different  and  most  commonly  used  methods  using  the  OptimClass  1  procedure  (Tichy  et  al., 

2010). The OptimClass 1 procedure was used to evaluate the different choices of classification techniques (S1). 

The OptimClass procedure uses the Fishers Phi coefficient (which considers within and between cluster species 

occurrences)  to  determine  if  a  species  is  ‘faithful’.  A  classification  is  good  when  there  are  large  number  of 

species which are ‘faithful’, where their distribution is within one cluster (community), and seen as bad if the 

species are dispersed across  several  communities. This process  was initiated using the freely available JUICE 

program  as  interface  between  the  vegetation  data,  PC-ORD  (McCune  and  Mefford,  2006)  and  OptimClass. 

Additionally,  this  method  was  used  to  inform  of  the  nested  hierarchical  structure  of  the  data  and  serves 

toward delineation of communities, alliances and orders. 

Step 2. Description of vegetation units 

APM produced ‘fingerprint’ analyses of the vegetation units using JUICE (

Tichý, 2002

). The fingerprint analyses 

used defines three important  descriptive vegetation descriptive features; (1) diagnostic  species, those which 


L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 11 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

occur within (mainly) one vegetation type, defined using Fisher’s Phi coefficient value, (2) dominant species, or 

those which have a cover >25 (%) of above ground biomass within a plot, and (3) constant species which occur 

in  60  %  of  releves  within  a  community.  The  fingerprint  provides  a  consistent  syllabus  for  description  and 

comparison of the defined floristic communities. 

Step 3. Determination of underlying vegetation patterns 

APM conducted Canonical Correspondence Analyses (CCA) (Leps and Smilauer, 2003) using the robust choice 

of  hierarchical  classification  with  the  environmental  data.  CCA  is  a  powerful  ordination  tool  used  to  relate 

underlying  environmental  drivers  with  second  data  matrix  (vegetation)  and  can  be  used  to  assist  in  the 

description of vegetation pattern. 

2.3.2

 

Terrestrial Vertebrate Fauna Survey Methodology 

The fauna field survey was undertaken by Dr Mitch Ladyman (Principal Biologist), Sarah Isbister (Environmental 

Biologist) and Arlen Hogan-West (Graduate Biologist) from 22 - 26 November 2016. The survey was designed 

to meet the criteria of a Level 1 fauna survey, as defined in the EPA Guidance Statement No. 56 on terrestrial 

fauna surveys for environmental impact assessment (EPA, 2004b), Position Statement No. 3 (EPA, 2002) and as 

instructed by the DPaW.  

The  field  survey  targeted  Malleefowl,  Shield-backed  Trapdoor  Spider  (SBTS)  and  Western  Spiny-tailed  Skink, 

three species protected under the EPBC Act and known to occur in the area. The survey utilised aluminium box 

traps,  camera  traps  and  acoustic  recording  devices.  All  opportunistic  observations  of  other  species  were 

recorded. Table 2-2 outlines target fauna species and the method of trapping employed to determine presence 

/ absence.  

Table 2-2: Target fauna species and method of trapping 

Fauna Species 

Trans

ect

 O

bs

er

vat

ion

 

Ther

m

al

 T

ri

gg

er

 Fau

na 

C

am

e

ra



A

lum

ini

u

m

 B

o

x T

rap



H

and Se

ar

chi

ng

 

Leipoa ocellata (Malleefowl) 



 

 

Idiosoma nigrum (Shield-backed Trapdoor Spider) 

 

 

 





Egernia stokesii badia (Western Spiny-tailed Skink) 



 



2.3.2.1

 

Acoustic monitoring 

A total of two full spectrum lossless WAC0 format with Wildlife Acoustics SM2BAT bat detectors (sampling rate 

384  kilohertz  (kHz),  trigger  6  decibels  (dB)  above  background;  48  dB  gain)  were  set  to  record  the  acoustic 

signatures  of  the  microbats  across  the  project  area.  Detectors  were  set  up  in  strategic  locations  where  the 

likelihood of detecting bats was significantly increased. Detectors were set to turn on automatically at sunset 

and off at sunrise (Table 2-3). 

 

 


L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 12 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

Table 2-3: Acoustic monitoring survey effort 

Trap Location 

No. of Traps 

No. of Trap Nights 

Total 

SM26670 




SM28066 





Total 





 

2.3.2.2



 

Thermal Trigger Fauna Cameras 

Scout  Guard  SG560K-14mHD  white  light  and  Reconyx  HC500  HyperFire™  Semi-Covert  IR  were  set  up  in  a 

drainage line (Table 2-4). The primary focus was on the Western Spiny-tailed Skink. 

Table 2-4: Thermal trigger camera survey effort 

Trap Location 

No. of Traps 

No. of Trap Nights 

Total 

TC001 




TC002 



TC003 




TC005 





Total 





 

2.3.2.3



 

Aluminium Box Traps 

A total of 136 aluminium box traps were set up in various arrays according to the habitat at each site (Table 

2-5).  Traps  were  set  up  in  habitats  likely  to  support  the  Western  Spiny-tailed  Skink.  Some  arrays  were  in  a 

pseudo linear fashion following an intermittent drainage line, while others were placed around hollow logs or 

at the base of trees (Figure 2-1). 

Table 2-5: Aluminium box trap survey effort 

Trap Location 

No. of Traps 

No. of Trap Nights 

Total 

Site 1 


18 

72 



Site 2 

19 


76 


Site 3 

19 


76 


Site 4 

20 


80 


Site 5 

20 


80 


Site 6 

20 


20 


Site 7 

20 


20 


Total 

136 

22 

424 

 

2.3.2.4



 

Short Range Endemics 

Idiosoma nigrum mainly occurs on the upper to lower slopes of ranges, with only small numbers on the crest. I. 

nigrum has been identified in large numbers on plains, but within this area individuals were restricted to the 

banks  of  well-established  drainage  lines.  Where  the  ranges  are  positioned  in  an  east-west  orientation  the 

burrows can be found on the southern slope. This species prefers to make their burrows in heavy clay soils in 

open  York  Gum  (Eucalyptus  loxophleba),  Salmon  Gum  (E.  salmonophloia),  Wheatbelt  Wandoo  (E.  capillosa

woodland, with Jam (Acacia acuminata) forming a sparse understorey. A thin layer of permanent Eucalyptus


L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 13 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

Casuarina  and  Acacia  litter  is  required,  within  which  the  spiders  forage  (Main,  1987).  Habitat  of  the  Project 

area that met these criteria was classified as suitable for I. nigrum

Other habitat containing some but not all major elements of suitable habitat was classified as marginal habitat. 

Searches  for  Idiosoma  nigrum  SBTS  were  undertaken  in  areas  of  marginal  and  suitable  habitat.  Each  search 

began with a transect to search for a burrow. Once one burrow was identified a targeted search was carried 

out, using the burrow as a centre point from which to radiate outwards. Up to six arms radiating 50 m from the 

burrow were determined using compass bearings, and each arm searched for more SBTS burrows. A total of 

five searches were undertaken by three field personnel. 

 


Site 6

Site 1

Site 2

Site 7

Site 4

Site 3

Site 5

M 59/387

M 59/425

496000


497000

498000


499000

67

70



00

0

67



71

00

0



67

72

00



0

67

73



00

0

67



74

00

0



Trap site

Tenements

Document Name: 20170210_Fig2-1_ Biol Report

O

\\M


AIN

SE

RV



ER

-PC


\se

rve


r st

ora


ge

\A

PM



 G

IS a


nd

 M

ap



pin

g\0


3_

Clie


nt\

TU

N\0



2_

GIS


 M

ap

s\2



01

70

21



0_

Fig


2-1

_ B


iol 

Re

po



rt.m

xd

1:15,000



ems@animalplantmineral.com.au / (08) 6296 5155

Figure 2-1: Fauna Trap Locations

L e g e n d

L e g e n d

0

1



2

3

4



0.5

Kilometers



M 59/387

M 59/425

496000


497000

498000


499000

67

70



00

0

67



71

00

0



67

72

00



0

67

73



00

0

67



74

00

0



67

75

00



0

Search radiation

Tenements

Document Name: 20170213_Fig2-2_ Biol Report

O

\\M


AIN

SE

RV



ER

-PC


\se

rve


r st

ora


ge

\A

PM



 G

IS a


nd

 M

ap



pin

g\0


3_

Clie


nt\

TU

N\0



2_

GIS


 M

ap

s\2



01

70

21



3_

Fig


2-2

_ B


iol 

Re

po



rt.m

xd

1:15,000



ems@animalplantmineral.com.au / (08) 6296 5155

Figure 2-2: Location of Shield-backed Trapdoor Spider Searches

L e g e n d

L e g e n d

0

1



2

3

4



0.5

Kilometers



L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 16 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

2.3.2.5

 

Transect Observation 

Nocturnal Transects 

Nocturnal  searching  comprised  vehicle-based  searches  of  all  roads  and  tracks  throughout  the  Project  area. 

Searches  commenced  after  sunset  (approximately  7pm)  and  typically  lasted  for  more  than  one  hour.  On  all 

occasions hand held spotlights were used to detect arboreal or volant nocturnal fauna, including possums and 

owls,  and  vehicle  headlights  and  spotlights  were  used  to  detect  ground  dwelling  reptiles  and  hawking 

nocturnal birds that are often found roosting on the track. 



Diurnal Transects 

Searches for Malleefowl nests were undertaken by walking transects in suitable habitat. The beginning of each 

transect was marked with a hand held Global Positioning System (GPS) unit.  Transects were walked by three 

personnel, each searching a 20  metre (m) swath width. The location of Malleefowl mounds identified during 

the search was recorded with a GPS. The areas searched are shown in Figure 2-3. 

Movement  between  traps  and  sites  on  foot  increases  the  likelihood  of  detection  of  scats  and  secondary 

evidence of fauna. All evidence observed during daily systematic trap clearing was recorded.  

 


M 59/387

M 59/425

496000


497000

498000


499000

67

70



00

0

67



71

00

0



67

72

00



0

67

73



00

0

67



74

00

0



67

75

00



0

Search area

Tenements

Document Name: 20170210_Fig2-3_ Biol Report

O

\\M


AIN

SE

RV



ER

-PC


\se

rve


r st

ora


ge

\A

PM



 G

IS a


nd

 M

ap



pin

g\0


3_

Clie


nt\

TU

N\0



2_

GIS


 M

ap

s\2



01

70

21



0_

Fig


2-3

_ B


iol 

Re

po



rt.m

xd

1:15,000



ems@animalplantmineral.com.au / (08) 6296 5155

Figure 2-3: Malleefowl Search Areas

L e g e n d

L e g e n d

0

1



2

3

4



0.5

Kilometers



L

EVEL 


2

 

B



IOLOGICAL 

A

SSESSMENT OF 



M

M



ULGINE 

P

ROJECT



,

 

W



ESTERN 

A

USTRALIA



 

Page | 18 

 

T

UNGSTEN 



M

INING 


NL 

3

 

VEGETATION RESULTS 

3.1

 

D

ESKTOP 

S

URVEY

 

3.1.1

 

Climate 

Leading  up  to  the  survey  period,  monthly  total  rainfall  was  above  average  for  May,  June,  July  and  August. 

Rainfall in September and October was below the average by 12.1 mm and 5.7 mm respectively (BoM, 2016a; 

BoM, 2016b). Figure 3-1 illustrates total and mean monthly rainfall at  Paynes Find in the six months prior to 

the survey. 

 

 



Figure 3-1: Monthly Paynes Find Mean Rainfall Leading up to the Survey 

 

3.1.2



 

Previous Surveys 

The vegetation survey undertaken by Woodman in 2003 identified seven vegetation units in the western half 

of the Project area. Most of the vegetation was in very good condition. Woodman concluded the vegetation 

was likely to be well represented in the region due to the same landforms occurring on neighbouring pastoral 

leases (Woodman, 2003). The vegetation communities are described in Table 3-1 and form a basis for 

comparison with the work undertaken for the present survey. 

 

 

0

10



20

30

40



50

60

R



ai

n

fal

l (m

m


Yüklə 9,02 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə