Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



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Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Bonnie Hill 
Esp
Esp
VCL
10.5.82
-
-
2
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.9.93
2 000+
Healthy
3
The Cups,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
24.6.83
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
L. sp. Bonnie Hill probably represents a new species.  The population on Fields Road (no. 2) would be threatened if
more land was released for agriculture.  Further action is required on the proposed vesting of Crown Land adjacent to
the Lort River and Fields Road for the purpose of a conservation reserve (CALM 1991, Leighton and Watson 1992).
Further survey is required.  Research is required to determine the response of this taxon to fire and to dieback
(
Phytophthora spp.).
References
Burgman (1985b), CALM (1991), Leighton and Watson (1992), Newbey (1983).

117
Leucopogon sp. Clyde Hill (M.A.Burgman 1207)
EPACRIDACEAE
An openly-branching or dense prickly shrub, 80 cm tall to 70 cm wide.  Leaves are held erect or horizontal, concave,
ovate-elliptic (10-13 x 2 mm), stalked, and taper to a rigid, sharp point.  On the lower side of the leaf there are 3 parallel
central veins and other veins branching towards the margin.  The white flowers are erect with 2 or 3 borne together on
short stalks in the axils of leaves; the corolla-tube is longer than the hairless sepals which end abruptly in a short point;
bracteoles are keeled.  The green fruits are globular (3.5 mm).
Leucopogon sp. Clyde Hill is closely related to L. breviflorus which has obtuse sepals and bracteoles.
Flowering Period:  May - June
Distribution and Habitat
L. sp. Clyde Hill is known only from north-west of Clyde Hill and Peak Eleanora, over 250 km to the west.  It occurs on
the margins of granite outcrops in sandy loam.  Associated genera include 
Allocasuarina and Leptospermum.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.5.93
1+
Good
2*
Peak Eleanora 
Esp
Esp
NP
18.9.93
4+
Good
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
L.  sp. Clyde Hill is poorly known and probably represents a new species.  Taxonomic revision of Leucopogon in
Western Australia is urgently required.  Classification of the many undescribed species and sorting of the Western
Australian Herbarium folders would remedy many of the problems encountered in searching for the poorly known
Leucopogon species. 
Further survey is required.  Research is required to determine the response of this taxon to fire and to dieback
(
Phytophthora spp.).
References
Burgman (1985b).

118
Leucopogon sp. Condingup (M.A.Burgman 1377)
EPACRIDACEAE
A shrub, 10-40 cm tall and 10-30 cm wide.  Leaves are broader towards the tip than the base (obovate, 4-5 x 1 mm),
concave, yellowish-green on both sides with fine, divergent nerves on the under side, and have an obtuse tip.  Flowers
are pendulous with 1- or 2-flowered inflorescences borne on long stalks (2.5-3.5 mm).  The calyx (2 mm) is pale green
and has concave sepals with acute tips; the corolla (3-4 mm) has a distinctive dark grey-black hue; the ovary is black. 
Flowering Period:  April - June
Distribution and Habitat
Leucopogon sp. Condingup is known from north-east of Condingup to Sheoaks Hill in the Nuytsland Nature Reserve, a
range of about 90 km.  It grows white or grey sand in low open mallee and low heath, associated with 
Eucalyptus
angulosa, Dryandra quercifolia, Banksia pulchella and B. petiolaris.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Condingup,NE Esp
Esp
?NR
20.6.83
-
-
?2
?Clyde Hill,SSE 
Esp
Esp
-
3.5.83
-
-
3*
Fisheries Rd 
Esp
Esp
NP
19.4.93
10+
Good
4*
Sheoaks Hill 
Esp
Esp
NR
22.4.93
100+
Good
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
L.  sp. Condingup is poorly known and probably represents a new species.  Taxonomic revision of Leucopogon in
Western Australia is urgently required.  Classification of the many undescribed species and sorting of the Western
Australian Herbarium folders would remedy many of the problems encountered in searching for the poorly known
Leucopogon species.
Further survey is required.  Research is required to determine the response of this taxon to fire and to dieback
(
Phytophthora spp.).
Recent surveys have found this taxon in Cape Arid National Park and the Nuytsland Nature Reserve.
References
Burgman (1985b).

119
Leucopogon sp. Coujinup (M.A.Burgman 1085)
EPACRIDACEAE
A spindly, rounded shrub, 20-30 cm tall and 20-30 cm wide.  Leaves are small, lanceolate to elliptic (2-2.5 x 1-1.5 mm),
stiff, overlapping and often clasping the stem, concave and have a sharp, spiny tip.  The white flowers are erect
becoming pendulous on long stalks (2 mm); the green calyx (2.5 mm) has sepals with acute tips.  The pendulous fruits
are sparsely covered in short white hairs.
Flowering Period:  March - April
Distribution and Habitat
The known populations of 
Leucopogon sp. Coujinup are distributed over 170 km, from the Oldfield River to the north-
west of Dingo Rock.  It grows in white-grey sand on dune ridges adjacent to salt pans or in yellow sandy clay loam on
undulating sandplain in shrub heath.  It may be associated with 
Banksia elderiana, Grevillea aneura, Adenanthos
glabrescens, Beaufortia schaueri and species of Verticordia, Calytrix and Allocasuarina.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Dingo Rock,NNW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
28.3.83
-
-
2
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.9.93
1 500+
Healthy
3*
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
18.9.93
500+
Healthy
4
West Point Rd 
Esp
Rav
-
10.84
-
-
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
L. sp. Coujinup is poorly known and probably represents a new species.  Taxonomic revision of Leucopogon in Western
Australia is urgently required.  Classification of the many undescribed species and sorting of the Western Australian
Herbarium folders would remedy many of the problems encountered in searching for the poorly known 
Leucopogon
species.  
This taxon is not known to occur in any conservation reserve.  The large population (no. 2) near Fields Road, north-east
of Cascade, would be threatened if more land was released for agriculture.  Further action is required on the proposed
vesting of Crown Land adjacent to the Lort River and Fields Road for the purpose of a conservation reserve (CALM
1991, Leighton and Watson 1992).  
Further survey is required.  Research is required to determine the response of this taxon to fire and to dieback
(
Phytophthora spp.).
References
Burgman (1985b), CALM (1991), Leighton and Watson (1992).

120
Leucopogon sp. Kau Rock (M.A.Burgman 1126)
EPACRIDACEAE
An erect to spreading shrub, up 70 cm tall.  Leaves are held almost perpendicular to the stem, shiny dark green on upper
surface, narrow triangular (4-8 x 1-2 mm) with margins rolled backwards towards the midrib (revolute); the lower
surface has minute hairs in interveinal grooves.  Flowers (5-10 mm) are creamy, stalkless with 2 or 3 borne in the upper
leaf axils.  The calyx tube is about half the length of the corolla; sepals are acute and the bracteoles obtuse at the apex.  
Two forms, one very robust and the other slighter, of this taxon are apparent.  
Leucopogon sp. Kau Rock has affinity to
L. allittii.
Flowering Period:  May
Distribution and Habitat
L. sp. Kau Rock is widespread between Peak Eleanora and Israelite Bay, a range of over 300 km.  It grows in brown
sandy loam and in fine calcareous loam (marl) in woodland, open mallee and shrub communities.  Associated genera
include 
Eucalyptus, Hakea and Banksia.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Kau Rock,SE 
Esp
Esp
NR
29.3.83
-
-
2*
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.5.93
2
Good
3*
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
10+
Good
4*
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
20
Good
5*
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
2
Good
6*
Mt Heywood,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
50+
Good
7*
Sheoak Hill,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
20+
Good
8*
Sheoak Hill,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
10+
Good
9*
Mt Ridley,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
1
Good
10*
Mt Ridley,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
2
Good
11*
Mt Heywood,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
10+
Good
12*
Daringdella Lake 
Esp
Esp
NR
20.4.93
1
Average
13*
Gegelup Esp
Esp
NR.
21.4.93
10
Good
14*
Balladonia Rd 
Esp
Esp
NP
24.4.93
10+
Good
15*
Peak Eleanora,SW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.9.93
500+
Good
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown

121
Summary and Recommendations
Recent surveys have found 
L. sp. Kau Rock to be widespread and relatively common in areas north of those cleared for
agriculture.  Taxonomic classification is required.
References
Burgman (1985b).

122
Leucopogon sp. Mount Heywood (M.A.Burgman 1211)
EPACRIDACEAE
[ex. 
Leucopogon sp. Cascades (M.A.Burgman 3700)]
A dense shrub, 40-50 cm tall and 70-90 cm wide.  The numerous slender woody branches are sparsely covered with
short hairs.  Leaves are small, nearly circular (1-2 mm) and strongly curved backwards (recurved); the upper surface of
the leaf is sparsely covered in minute glandular hairs, giving a rough texture.  Flowers are cream-coloured; the calyx (3
mm) comprises more than half the length of the corolla tube (4-5 mm); the acute sepals are deeply divided and curl
backwards at the tip. 
Leucopogon sp. Mount Heywood has affinity to L. hamulosus.
Flowering Period:  May
Distribution and Habitat
L. sp. Mount Heywood typically grows in white or yellow sand on the margins of saline lakes and depressions between
Salmon Gums and Clyde Hill, with a known range of about 100 km.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
4.5.83
-
-
2a*
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
100+
Good
2b*
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
500+
Good
3*
Mt Heywood,NNE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
100+
Good
4*
Sheoak Hill,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
100+
Good
5*
Mt Ridley,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
1 000+
Good
6*
Salmon Gums 
Esp
Esp
NR
18.11.93
100+
Good
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
L. sp. Mount Heywood is a characteristic floral component of saline lakes and depressions in the Clyde Hill-Mt Ridley
area.  This area is not currently threatened by clearing for agriculture.
Burgman (1985b) may have listed two different taxa in his report as "
Leucopogon aff. hamulosus".  The specimen MAB
3700 is not represented in PERTH nor Burgman's field herbaria; a survey at the given locality found the superficially
similar 
L. sp. Roberts Swamp  (K.R. Newbey 8173).  The specimen MAB 1211 is represented in Burgman's field
herbarium; the phrase name 
Leucopogon sp. Mount Heywood has therefore been adopted.

123
Summary and Recommendations (cont’d)
Taxonomic revision of 
Leucopogon in Western Australia is urgently required.  Classification of the many undescribed
species and sorting of the Western Australian Herbarium folders would remedy many of the problems encountered in
searching for the poorly known 
Leucopogon  species.
L. sp. Mount Heywood occurs in the Salmon Gums Nature Reserve.  Further survey is required.
References
Burgman (1985b).

124
Leucopogon sp. Munglinup (K.R.Newbey 8123)
EPACRIDACEAE
An upright-spreading, mid-dense shrub, 40-80 cm tall and 30-80 cm broad.  Old wood is slightly rough and dull, darkish
grey, while newer wood is pale brown and densely covered in short, stiff hairs.  Leaves are light green, alternate,
ascending, narrow-obovate (3 mm long x 1 mm wide), and have margins that roll backwards (revolute).  The lower
surface of leaves have fine, parallel nerves that are covered with minute white hairs.  Flowers and fruits have not been
seen.
Flowering Period:  Unknown
Distribution and Habitat
The only known location of this taxon is north of Munglinup where it grows on an almost flat plain in well-drained,
shallow sandy loams in 
Eucalyptus redunca open mallee.  Associated species include E. leptocalyx, E. uncinata,
Grevillea pectinata, Melaleuca subfalcata, M. holosericea, Templetonia sulcata and Gahnia ancistrophylla.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Munglinup,N Esp
Rav
-
15.11.80
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
Currently, no specimen of 
Leucopogon  sp. Munglinup is lodged in the Western Australian Herbarium.  Further
collections are required to determine its taxonomic status.  In 1992, a survey failed to relocate this taxon.
References
Newbey (1983).

125
Leucopogon sp. Roberts Swamp (K.R.Newbey 8173)
EPACRIDACEAE
An upright, mid-dense shrub, 30-35 cm tall and 20-25 cm broad, with numerous slender branchlets.  Old wood is
slightly rough and dull darkish grey, while newer wood is smooth and light grey.  Leaves are dull green, small (2.0-2.5 x
1.5 mm), spreading, margins have scattered short hairs, and only the lower half of the leaves have the margins rolled
backwards (revolute); the tip bends downwards (deflexed).  The white flowers are clustered at the ends of branchlets;
the calyx (2-2.5 mm) is more than half the length of the corolla and the acute sepals and bracteoles are covered in minute
felt-like hairs.  The globular fruits are flattened on top.
Flowering Period:  September - October
Distribution and Habitat
Leucopogon sp. Roberts Swamp grows on a fossil alluvial flat on a tributary of the Lort River.  The alluvium (sand over
loamy clay) is not saline.  It grows in open shrub mallee of 
Eucalyptus angustissima with tall shrubs of Santalum
acuminatum and Hakea adnata.  Other associated genera include Acacia, Melaleuca and Restio.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.9.93
1 500+
Good
2*
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.9.93
2+
Average
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
L. sp. Roberts Swamp is poorly known and possibly rare.  The large population (no. 1) near Fields Road, north-east of
Cascade, could possibly be threatened if more land was released for agriculture.  Further action is required on the
proposed vesting of Crown Land adjacent to the Lort River and Fields Road for the purpose of a conservation reserve
(CALM 1991, Leighton and Watson 1992).
Further survey is required.  Research is required to determine the response of this taxon to fire and to dieback
(
Phytophthora spp.).
References
Burgman (1985b), CALM (1991), Leighton and Watson (1992), Newbey (1983).

126
Leucopogon sp. South Coast (K.R.Newbey 8213)
EPACRIDACEAE
An upright, moderately open shrub, 45-50 cm tall and 40-50 cm broad with few secondary branches.  Old wood is
almost smooth, while newer wood is covered with short, dull red hairs.  Leaves are dull darkish green, flat, alternate,
elliptical (5-7 x 3 mm), have a short callous point and margins fringed with minute hairs.  Leaves have conspicuous
nerves on the lower surface.  Leaf stalks are strap-like (1 mm).  Inflorescences are terminal spikes of 5-7 flowers on a
main stalk which is pale brown, slightly undulate and covered in short, stiff hairs.  The white corolla tube (2.5-3.0 mm)
is hairless with the narrow lobes curving backwards; the inner surface is bearded with white hairs.  The ovary is smooth.
Anthers have no appendages.  Fruits are spherical (1.8 mm) with a persistent style.
Leucopogon sp. South Coast may be closely related to L. bossiaea.
Flowering Period:  September - October
Fruiting Period:  Late November - December
Distribution and Habitat
The only known location of 
L. sp. South Coast is north-east of Bonnie Hill where it grows on flat plain in calcareous,
loamy sands amongst 
Eucalyptus leptocalyx mallee.  Associated species include E. incrassata, E. uncinata, Banksia
media, Grevillea pectinata, Astartea ambigua, Lepidosperma brunonianum, Conostephium sp. and Gahnia
ancistrophylla.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Bonnie Hill,NE 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
16.11.93
13+
Good
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
L.  sp. South Coast is an inconspicuous species that is poorly known and possibly rare and threatened.  The known
locality is at the northern limit of agriculture in the Esperance District.  In 1993, a survey relocated the known
population by using Newbey's (1983) description.  His specimen, KRN 8213 is not currently lodged in the Western
Australian Herbarium.  Taxonomic revision of 
Leucopogon in Western Australia is urgently required.  Classification of
the many undescribed species and sorting of the Western Australian Herbarium folders would remedy many of the
problems encountered in searching for the poorly known 
Leucopogon species.
L. sp. South Coast is not known in any conservation reserve.  Further survey is required.  
References
Newbey (1983).

127
Melaleuca agathosmoides C.A.Gardner
MYRTACEAE
A diffuse shrub to 1-1.5 m tall.  Leaves are opposite, shortly oblong (2-3 x 1.5 mm), thick, glandular, stalkless and have
an obtuse tip.  The white or straw-coloured flowers are borne singly or in lateral clusters on old wood.  Staminal
bundles are less than 1 cm long, each claw having 14-20 filaments.  Petals are erect, about 5 mm long and have an acute
apex.  Calyx lobes are ovate to orbicular.  The ovary has 3 locules and a long style.  Fruits (5 mm diameter) are slightly
immersed in the old wood and have 5 triangular-shaped, obtuse lobes.

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