Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



Yüklə 1,44 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə12/25
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü1,44 Mb.
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   25

Flowering PeriodSeptember - November
Distribution and Habitat
Melaleuca agathosmoides is known from two localities.  The largest population occurs within a 5 km radius of Hatter
Hill, while another collection has been made approximately 40 km to the west, near Lake King.  It grows in gravelly,
red clay loam and may form dense stands beneath open eucalyptus woodland.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Hatter Hill,NE
Esp
Rav
VCL (Mining Lease)
27.10.92
200+
Part-dist.
1b
Hatter Hill,NW
Esp
Rav
VCL (Mining Lease)
27.10.92
500+
Part-dist.
1c
Hatter Hill,S
Esp
Rav
VCL (Mining Lease)
27.10.92
50+ 
Disturbed
1d
Hatter Hill,SE
Esp
Rav
VCL (Mining Lease)
22.3.91
100 000+
Part-dist.
2
Lake King,NE
Kat
LG
-
1.10.80
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
M. agathosmoides is geographically restricted but locally abundant at Hatter Hill.  Sub-populations nos. 1a, 1b and 1c
have been partially disturbed by mining activities; sub-population no. 1d has been covered by a tenement
(P. 
Armstrong, personal communication; F. Mollemans, personal communication; R. Thomas, personal
communication).  Currently, mining operations have ceased in the area, however it is anticipated that the area will
continue to attract considerable interest.  Consequently, these populations could be under threat if mining activity were
expanded.  Monitoring is therefore required to ensure that this species does not become further threatened in the Hatter
Hill area.
The population near Lake King needs to be resurveyed to determine its size and status.  Further survey is required.
References
Blackall and Grieve (1980), Gardner (1939a).

128
Melaleuca calycina subsp. dempta Barlow
MYRTACEAE
A dense, upright shrub, 1.5-2.5 m tall.  Leaves are broadly ovate (4-6 x 3-5 mm), opposite, thick, faintly glandular-
dotted and have an obtuse apex.  The white flower heads are globular with 1 to 3 borne at the ends of branches.
Staminal bundles are less than 1 cm long; the calyx tube and lobes are covered with white, silky hairs.  Bracts are
numerous, overlapping, silky-hairy and brown. 
This subspecies has fruit with very short lobes or an entire rim, whereas subsp. calycina has five long, acute
protuberances spreading from the rim.  Subsp. dempta is also distinguished by the obtuse apex of the leaf, whereas the
apex is acute in subsp. calycina
Flowering Period:  August - September
Distribution and Habitat
Melaleuca calycina subsp. dempta is known from only two localities, 5 km apart, east of Scaddan.  This taxon occurs
near the middle of the range of M. calycina subsp. calycina.  It grows in clay in winter-wet depressions.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Scaddan,E 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
24.9.92
1 000+
Good
2*
Scaddan,E 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
24.9.92
50
Fair
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
M. calycina subsp. dempta is not known to occur in any conservation reserve.  Both the known populations on Scaddan
Road are threatened, population no. 1 by any road realignment and possibly by increased waterlogging caused by poor
drainage, and population no. 2 by road maintenance.  Road markers are recommended for both populations.  Further
survey to accurately determine the conservation status of this taxon is urgently required.
References
Barlow and Cowley (1988), Blackall and Grieve (1980).

129
Melaleuca coccinea subsp. eximia Cowley
MYRTACEAE
An openly-branched shrub, 2-3 m tall, which is covered in soft matted hairs on all parts, except the older leaves which
lose their hairs.  Leaves are very narrowly triangular (8-20 x 1-2 mm).  The dark red inflorescence is a spike of 22-38
flowers on an axis 40-85 mm long with a stalk (2-5 mm).  The broadly ovate bracts (13 x 1 mm) and the 2 elliptic
bracteoles (3 x 2 mm) sometimes persist to anthesis.  The calyx tube is barrel-shaped and hairy.  Sepals are broadly
ovate (1.5-2 mm) and persist to fruit maturity.  There are 9-18 red stamens (11-26 mm, including claw 7-10 mm) per
bundle.  The fruit is compressed barrel-shaped (3 x 4-7 mm), papery in texture and has the valves deeply recessed
below the aperture. 
Flowering Period:  October - December
Distribution and Habitat
Melaleuca coccinea subsp. eximia is known from the Wittenoom Hills Nature Reserve and about 30 km to the south-
east near Coolinup Road.  It grows in light brown sandy soils associated with granite outcrops in scrub with Eucalyptus
forrestiana and Calothamnus quadrifidus.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Wittenoon Hill 
Esp
Esp
NR
10.11.91
-
-
1b
Mt Burdett 
Esp
Esp
NR
26.11.85
-
-
2
Coolinup Rd 
Esp
Esp
?Private
15.12.88
Numerous
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
M. coccinea subsp. eximia appears to be very geographically restricted.  It occurs in the Wittenoom Hills Nature
Reserve where it should remain secure.  Further survey is required.
References
Cowley et al. (1990).

130
Mesomelaena sp. Munglinup (M.A.Burgman 3898)
CYPERACEAE
A small, inconspicuous, tufted sedge, 6 cm tall and 5 cm diameter.  Spikelets are 1-2 flowered in a lateral head, 2-3 mm
long.
Flowering Period:  September - October
Distribution and Habitat
Mesomelaena sp. Munglinup has been collected west of Cascades and near "Bitterwater Swamp" which is possibly near
the Warburton Ranges in the Victoria Desert.  Near Cascade it grows on sandplain in very open shrub mallee and heath.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
West Point Rd 
Esp
Rav
?Shire Rd Res.
29.9.84
-
-
1b
West Point Rd 
Esp
Rav
?VCL 
29.9.84
-
-
2
Bitterwater Swamp
-
-
-
10.73
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Mesomelaena  sp. Munglinup was searched for at both locations on West Point Rd in September 1992, but was not
located.  Instead, this taxon was confused with Schoenus nanus and S. subflavus, both of which are present at these
sites.  Burgman (1985b) describes this taxon "may be more widespread and common than [his] collections indicate".
Further survey is required.
References
Burgman (1985b).

131
Microcybe sp. Hatter Hill (K.R.Newbey 6546)
RUTACEAE
A spreading, moderately dense, woody shrub, 50-70 cm tall and 40-50 cm wide.  Leaves are linear (10 mm) with the
edges of the leaves rolled backwards towards the midrib (revolute).  Flowers are without stalks and borne in terminal
heads, with the upper leaves exceeding the head.  Each flower has 5 petals, 10 free stamens and a distinct calyx which
is shorter than the petals.
This taxon has affinity to Microcybe pauciflora.
Flowering Period:  November
Distribution and Habitat
Microcybe sp. Hatter Hill is known only from the Hatter Hill area, where it occurs on a small kaolinitic breakaway in
well-drained loam.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Hatter Hill 
Esp
Rav
?VCL (Mining Lease)
14.11.79
-
-
1b
Hatter Hill
Esp
Rav
?VCL (Mining Lease)
16.9.89
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
M. sp. Hatter Hill appears to have a very restricted distribution.  Hatter Hill has various mining tenements covering the
area.  The two collections lodged in the Western Australian Herbarium have only vague locality information.  Further
survey is required.

132
Mirbelia densiflora C.A.Gardner
PAPILIONACEAE
An upright, spreading shrub, 0.3-1.0 m tall and 0.4-0.5 m wide.  Leaves are linear (10-15 mm) with the margins rolled
backwards towards the midrib (revolute) and the tip has a short, sharp point.  The flowers, which are borne in dense
terminal heads, are deep golden yellow with reddish centres and have a large circular upright petal.  The calyx is silky-
hairy, with the posterior lobes united for half their length.  The ovary and pod have 2 ovules which occur in 2 separate
cells.
Flowering Period:  October - January
Distribution and Habitat
Mirbelia densiflora is distributed over 150 km between Young River and Newdegate, but is most frequent in the area
between Hatter Hill and Frank Hann National Park.  It grows on small breakaways in stony loam and on gently
undulating plains in well-drained loamy sand; in open woodlands, Eucalyptus redunca open shrublands and heaths.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Young River 
Esp
Esp
-
1.36
-
-
2a*
Hatter Hill,N 
Esp
Rav
VCL
27.10.92
60+ 
Healthy
2b*
Hatter Hill,N
Esp
Rav
VCL
27.10.92
100+
Healthy
2c
Hatter Hill
Esp
Rav
VCL (Mining Lease)
27.10.92
500+
Healthy
3*
Mt Gibbs,W 
Esp
Rav
VCL
27.10.92
10+
Healthy
4
Frank Hann 
Esp
Rav
NP
28.10.92
10+
Healthy
5
Newdegate Kat
LG
-
12.10.65
-
-
* = new population / sub-population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
M. densiflora is found in a variety of habitats with the largest known populations occurring near Hatter Hill.  At least
one population occurs in the Frank Hann National Park.  Further survey is required.
References
Gardner (1942).

133
Myoporum velutinum Chinn. ms
MYOPORACEAE
A shrub, 1 m tall.  Leaves are narrow-lanceolate (15-65 x 6-10 mm) and covered in short, felt-like hairs.  Stems are
covered in short, white hairs.  Flowers are small, regular and white with prominent purple spots at base of the lobes and
the upper section of the short, straight tube.  The flowers are borne on stalks (2-3 mm) with 1-4 clustered in the axils of
leaves. 
Flowering Period:  September
Fruiting Period:  February
Distribution and Habitat
Myoporum velutinum ms is known from two localities less than 25 km apart, south of Condingup.  It grows in damp,
slightly saline, brown loamy sand on the margins of creeks.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mungliginup Creek 
Esp
Esp
Private
29.9.86
Common
-
2
Mt Hawes,SE 
Esp
Esp
NP
14.2.89
1
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
M. velutinum ms may be threatened in the future by increased salinity levels and waterlogging, as a result of land
clearing in the catchment area where this species is known to grow.  Further survey is required, especially along
drainage lines in the Cape Le Grand National Park.  Collection of germ-plasm/seed material is recommended. 

134
Otion rigidum Crisp ms
PAPILIONACEAE
[ex. Aotus sp. Dundas (M.A.Burgman 2835)]
A shrub, 0.5-0.8 m tall and 0.4-0.9 wide, with rigid, straight branchlets that are covered in minute, tightly curled hairs
and are frequently spinescent.  The scattered leaves are widely spreading, stalked (0.5 mm), narrow-oblong (1.5-10 x
0.8-1.5 mm), thick, obtuse at the apex, and covered in minute hairs when young and on the lower side only when older;
margins are tightly rolled backwards towards the midrib (revolute) creating a groove on the underside.  Single flowers
are borne in the upper leaf axils on shortly-hairy stalks (1.5-4 mm); the calyx (5 mm) is covered in short hairs and has 5
lobes which are about half the length of the calyx, the upper 2 lobes are united for approximately half their length.  The
large, upright, broad-ovate standard (9.5 x 8.5 mm) is notched at the summit and yellow on the upper surface and red
beneath; the wings are yellow and the keel deep red.  The ovary is covered with long, white hairs.  The pod is almost
globular (7 x 5 mm) and covered with both long white and short curly hairs.
Otion rigidum ms is closely related to O. microphyllum (ex. Oxylobium microphyllum) which mostly occurs in the
Ravensthorpe-Hopetoun area and has more slender, non-spinescent branchlets and usually smaller leaves (1-5 x 0.6-2
mm).
Flowering Period:  October - December
Distribution and Habitat
O. rigidum ms occurs between Peak Eleanora and Mt Heywood, a range of 140 km.  It grows on sandy flats, sometimes
near watercourses or salt lakes, in open mallee and shrub communities.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Heywood,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
10.70
-
-
2
Salmon Gums,ENE 
Esp
Esp
NR
18.11.93
10+
Good
3*
Salmon Gums 
Esp
Esp
NR
18.11.93
1 000+
Good
4
Salmon Gums,S 
Esp
Esp
-
14.10.31
-
-
5
Grass Patch,E 
Esp
Esp
-
19.10.82
-
-
6
Peak Charles,SSW 
Esp
Esp
NP
11.11.79
-
-
7
Peak Eleanora,S 
Esp
Esp
VCL
2.10.83
-
-
8
?Kumarl,W Esp
Esp
VCL
5.10.85
-
-
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown

135
Summary and Recommendations
O. rigidum ms is the type of a new genus being described by M. Crisp (personal communication).  Recent taxonomic
work has found this taxon to be reasonably widespread and not as rare and vulnerable as originally believed by
Burgman (1985b).  It is known to occur in the Salmon Gums Nature Reserve and Peak Charles National Park.  Further
opportunistic survey is required.
References
Burgman (1985b).

136
Persoonia baeckeoides Weston
PROTEACEAE
An erect, spreading shrub, 0.5-0.9 m tall, with many stems branching from the base.  Young branchlets are moderately
hairy when young, but the hairs disappear with age.  The alternate, crowded leaves are small, spoon-shaped (5-11 x 2-4
mm), obtuse at the tip, twisted at the base, flat, and without hairs.  Flowers are yellow-green in colour, narrow-oblong
(8 x 1.5 mm) and borne on stalks (2-3 mm).  The fleshy stonefruit is ellipsoid (8-11 x 5 mm) and smooth.
This species is a distinctive one, not closely resembling any other Persoonia.
Flowering Period:  November - December
Distribution and Habitat
Persoonia baeckeoides is known from only two localities, north-east and north-west of Peak Charles, where it grows in
yellow sandy loam over laterite in heath.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Peak Charles,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
5.12.80
-
-
2
Peak Charles,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
10.66
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
The general vicinity of the known population was burnt in patches by fire in January 1991.  Further survey is required
to determine the size and extent of these remote populations, and to determine whether further populations exist.

137
Phebalium rude subsp. lineare (C.A.Gardner) Paul G.Wilson 
RUTACEAE
An erect, multi-branched shrub, to 1.5 m tall.  Leaves are thick, linear (20 x 1-1.5 mm), narrowing slightly towards the
base and rounded at the apex.  Solitary, regular, white flowers are borne on stalks in the leaf axils.  Flowers have a
distinct calyx, 5 petals, 10 free stamens which have shiny stalks, and an ovary which is also shiny.  Seed is bluntly
ellipsoidal (3 mm long), smooth and dark brown.
Flowering Period:  April - May, October - December
Distribution and Habitat
Phebalium rude subsp. lineare is known only from Mt Ragged, north-west of Israelite Bay.  It grows in skeletal soil on
exposed slopes and in valleys amongst quartzite rocks.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Ragged 
Esp
Esp
NP
23.4.93
1 000+
Good
Response to Disturbance
Two years after a hot burn on Mt Ragged (February 1991), this taxon had resprouted, with numerous stems (40-50 cm
tall) from the base of plants, and was flowering.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
P. rude subsp. lineare is very geographically restricted and possibly rare.  Frequent fires in the Mt Ragged area may be
a problem for this taxon.  Further survey is required.
P. rude subsp. lineare occurs in the Cape Arid National Park.
References
Wilson (1970).

138
Phlegmatospermum richardsii (F.Muell.) E.A.Shaw
BRASSICACEAE
An erect, hairy, annual herb, to 20 cm tall.  The basal leaves are broad towards the tip (egg-shaped), to 7 cm long, with
margins that are toothed or entire.  Stem leaves are narrower, to 4 cm long, and shallowly lobed to entire.  The oldest
flowers are at the edge of the elongating head of flowers.  Flowers are white or yellow, with sepals 2-4 mm long and
petals 3-7 mm long; the style is exserted beyond the petals.  The dry fruit (<1 cm) is composed of 2 carpels separated
by a partition, each valve has warty protuberances with hairs on its base; fruit stalks (<1 cm) are stout and spreading. 
Flowering Period:  Unknown
Distribution and Habitat
Phlegmatospermum richardsii occurs on the Nullarbor Plain from Eucla to Fowler's Bay in South Australia.  
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Eucla Esp
Dund
-
9.1879
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
P. richardsii is a poorly known species which has not been collected for 100 years.  Specimens are lodged in the
Adelaide and Melbourne Herbaria, but not in Perth.  No specific localities are known for this species, however it
appears to be mainly distributed in South Australia rather than Western Australia.  Further survey is required; liaison
with the Adelaide Herbarium is recommended.
References
Hewson (1982).

139
Pimelea halophila Rye
THYMELAEACEAE
An undershrub, 1.5-15 cm tall, which often has the main stem buried, giving rise to a number of main branches
appearing at ground level and forming a cushion.  Leaves are alternate, hairless, elliptic (0.4-3.2 x 0.4-1.5 mm) and
green to bluish-green.  Flower heads are terminal and compact, with 4-20 pink flowers per head.  Sepals are white to
cream.  Flower stalks are hairy.  The floral tubes of male flowers are 2-2.5 mm long, while those of females are 1.5-1.7
mm long, both are densely hairy on the outside.  Seed (2 x 1 mm) has faint longitudinal markings.
Pimelea halophila is related to P. serpyllifolia but differs in the alternate and smaller leaves, in being densely hairy on
the outside of the flowers and in the shiny ovary of the female flowers.

Yüklə 1,44 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   25




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə